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I have a ForEachWithIndex EM

static void ForEachWithIndex<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enu, Action<T, int> action)
{
    int i = 0;
    foreach(T item in enu)
        action(item, i++);
}

I call it like this

my_int_array.ForEachWithIndex((x, i) => x += i);

Now i want to create one which checks for condition and then perform that action.

Usually i use above as

my_int_array.ForEachWithIndex((x,i) => 
{
    if (x != 0)
        x += i;
});

I want a EM that takes that condition as parameter also. How to do that?

share|improve this question
    
You could add predicate to your extension –  Ation May 16 '12 at 7:14
    
Yeah exactly that. How? –  Nikhil Agrawal May 16 '12 at 7:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to pass an additional Func parameter, something like this:

public static void ForEachWithIndex<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enu,
                           Action<T, int> action, Func<T, int, bool> condition)
{
    int i = 0;
    foreach (T item in enu)
    {
        if (condition(item, i))
        {
            action(item, i);
        }
        ++i;
    }
}

And this is what the code for your example look like:

my_int_array.ForEachWithIndex((x, i) => x += i, (x, i) => x != 0);
share|improve this answer
    
You are my man... Thanks –  Nikhil Agrawal May 16 '12 at 7:32
1  
@Santo: "i" is a value type. Predicates can only change a copy of "i", not an original value!. –  Dennis May 16 '12 at 7:36
    
Dennis, you are right I was thinking on a case where an Anonymous predicate is declared and a local variable is used inside the predicate. –  Santo May 16 '12 at 22:45

I would try to avoid building one big extension method which does it all. Break it out, just like LINQ does.

Personally I wouldn't actually do any of this though - I'd build a query with LINQ, then use a foreach statement for the action:

// Assuming you want the *original* indexes
var query = array.Select((Value, Index) => new { value, Index })
                 .Where(pair => pair.Index != 0);

foreach (var pair in query)
{
    // Do something
}

It's hard to know exactly what you're trying to do, given that incrementing the lambda parameter won't really achieve anything. I would strongly encourage you to think of composing blocks though... and you may find Eric Lippert's views on foreach vs ForEach interesting.

share|improve this answer
    
I personally mirror your feelings of not creating one big EM. But i can't help it. I am given a module to develop. In it even after using EM my module's lines of code are increasing day by day. What will happen if i don't use EM's. –  Nikhil Agrawal May 16 '12 at 7:37
    
@NikhilAgrawal: You'll have easier-to-maintain code, because you'll have logically separated the condition from the action? –  Jon Skeet May 16 '12 at 8:03

Just add the condition delegate to parameters list:

static void ForEachWithIndexWithCondition<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enu, 
                     Func<T, int, bool> condition, Action<T, int> action)
{
    int i = 0;
    foreach (T item in enu)
    {
        if (condition(item, i))
            action(item, i);
        i++;
     }
}

Usage:

        var list = new List<string> { "Jonh", "Mary", "Alice", "Peter" };

        list.ForEachWithIndexWithCondition(
            (s, i) => i % 2 == 0,
            (s, i) => Console.WriteLine(s));
share|improve this answer
1  
Dennis I think i should be incremented outside action. Else it will give wrong indexes. and BTW how to call it? –  Nikhil Agrawal May 16 '12 at 7:24
    
@NikhilAgrawal, yes, you're right - in the case if condition is false, next iteration will give wrong indexes. Updated the answer. –  Dennis May 16 '12 at 7:44
    
Without usage it was a half baked answer. If usage was given before I would have accepted your answer. Still Thanks. +1 from me. –  Nikhil Agrawal May 16 '12 at 7:53

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