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I'm encountering an odd behavior with Linux permissions and group membership that's got me scratching my head. Here's the situation:

  1. I have two users: alice and bob

    alice@KAL:~$ id alice
    uid=3000(alice) gid=3000(alice) groups=3000(alice)
    alice@KAL:~$ id bob
    uid=3001(bob) gid=3001(bob) groups=3001(bob)
    
  2. In alice's home directory, there is a subdirectory that I want to give write permission to bob.

    (as alice)
    alice@KAL:~$ mkdir shared
    alice@KAL:~$ chmod g+w shared
    alice@KAL:~$ ls -l
    total 4
    drwxrwxr-x 2 alice alice 4096 2012-05-15 23:56 shared
    
  3. I add group alice (gid=3000) as one of bob's secondary groups

    (as root)
    root@KAL:~# id bob
    uid=3001(bob) gid=3001(bob) groups=3001(bob)
    root@KAL:~# usermod -G 3000 bob
    root@KAL:~# id bob
    uid=3001(bob) gid=3001(bob) groups=3001(bob),3000(alice)
    
  4. I open a new terminal, and su as bob, and test my permissions in alice's home directory.

    (initially as kp, su'ing as bob)
    kp@KAL:~$ sudo su bob
    bob@KAL:/home/kp$ cd /home/alice
    bob@KAL:/home/alice$ ls -l
    total 4
    drwxrwxr-x 2 alice alice 4096 2012-05-15 23:56 shared
    bob@KAL:/home/alice$ touch test
    touch: cannot touch `test': Permission denied    <-- fails as expected
    bob@KAL:/home/alice$ cd shared
    bob@KAL:/home/alice/shared$ touch test     <-- succeeds as expected
    bob@KAL:/home/alice/shared$ ls -l
    total 0
    -rw-r--r-- 1 bob bob 0 2012-05-16 00:02 test
    
  5. In a separate terminal, and as root, I revoke bob's membership in group alice.

    (root)
    root@KAL:~# usermod -G 3001 bob
    root@KAL:~# id bob
    uid=3001(bob) gid=3001(bob) groups=3001(bob)
    
  6. Now, going back to the terminal where I'm su'ed as bob, it's clear that the membership revocation is recognized but not respected.

    (as bob)
    bob@KAL:/home/alice/shared$ id bob
    uid=3001(bob) gid=3001(bob) groups=3001(bob)   <-- group 3000 no longer secondary group
    bob@KAL:/home/alice/shared$ touch test2        <-- should fail
    bob@KAL:/home/alice/shared$ ls -l
    total 0
    -rw-r--r-- 1 bob bob 0 2012-05-16 00:02 test
    -rw-r--r-- 1 bob bob 0 2012-05-16 00:20 test2
    bob@KAL:/home/alice/shared$ rm test            <-- this should also fail
    bob@KAL:/home/alice/shared$ ls -l
    total 0
    -rw-r--r-- 1 bob bob 0 2012-05-16 00:20 test2
    
  7. If I now exit, and su as bob again, the change is group membership is now respected.

    (as bob)
    bob@KAL:/home/alice/shared$ exit
    exit
    kp@KAL:~$ sudo su bob
    bob@KAL:/home/kp$ cd /home/alice/shared
    bob@KAL:/home/alice/shared$ ls -l
    total 0
    -rw-r--r-- 1 bob bob 0 2012-05-16 00:20 test2
    bob@KAL:/home/alice/shared$ touch test3
    touch: cannot touch `test3': Permission denied   <-- now fails as expected
    bob@KAL:/home/alice/shared$ id bob
    uid=3001(bob) gid=3001(bob) groups=3001(bob)
    bob@KAL:/home/alice/shared$ 
    

Is this some artifact of using su? Are group memberships only determined at start of the shell?

(This is on a machine running Ubuntu Maverick 10.10 x86_64 2.6.35-32-generic and running bash shell.)

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1  
Yes, they are determined at the start of a (login) shell. So you (or Bob or Alice) either log out and log in again, or spawn a login shell on top of the current one: su - bob –  Carlos Campderrós May 16 '12 at 10:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Group memberships persist during sessions as they are applied to a process, i.e., your current shell.

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