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I'm watching a webcast on WCF, and it has two endpoints defined in the app.config, one netTcpBinding and one mexHttpBinding.

It also has two base addresses, net.tcp://localhost:9000 and http://localhost:8000.

I'm wondering how it associates those base addresses with the endpoints. Since your endpoint specifies tcp or http, why are the base addresses prefixed with net.tcp and http?

If WCF uses net.tcp base addresses with netTcpBinding endpoints, what happens if you have two tcp endpoints that listen on 9000 and 9001, what would you put into the config to stop the conflict?

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The base addresses are used when you are self hosting your WCF service rather than hosting in IIS. I guess you cannot have 2 endpoints with the same binding in a single service element. –  Rajesh May 16 '12 at 8:22
    
The concept of base addresses is also there with IIS hosting its just they are already defined for you as the location of .svc file –  Richard Blewett May 16 '12 at 10:27
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'm wondering how it associates those base addresses with the endpoints.

Per protocol.

When you define service endpoints, you can give relative or absolute addresses for the endpoints, if you give an absolute endpoint address then the base addresses will not be used to generated the actual endpoint address, however if you give a relative address in your endpoint then a combination of your base address and relative address will be used to generated the final endpoint address.

A relative endpoint address is like this for example:

  <endpoint address="/hostHttp"  binding="wsHttpBinding"  contract="IMyService" />
  <endpoint address="/hostNetTcp"  binding="netTcpBinding"  contract="IMyService" />

Now WCF will generate the actual endpoint address using your base address that you defined per protocol:

<baseAddresses>
            <add baseAddress="http://localhost:8550/MyServiceHost/Service"/>
            <add baseAddress="net.tcp://localhost:8551/MyServiceHost/Service"/>
</baseAddresses>

So your HTTP endpoint address will ultimately be:

http://localhost:8550/MyServiceHost/Service/hostHttp

and your netTcp endpoint:

net.tcp://localhost:8551/MyServiceHost/Service/hostNetTcp

Now if you have another protocol defined, and you haven't defined an absolute address in your endpoint, WCF will look for the base address defined for that particular protocol, and generate an endpoint using the base address.

If WCF uses net.tcp base addresses with netTcpBinding endpoints, what happens if you have two tcp endpoints that listen on 9000 and 9001, what would you put into the config to stop the conflict?

I think it would be best to give absolute adresses in ypour endpoints in this instance:

<endpoint address="net.tcp://localhost:9000/MyServiceHost/Service"
                   binding="netTcpBinding"
                   contract="IMyService" />

<endpoint address="net.tcp://localhost:9001/MyServiceHost/Service"
                   binding="netTcpBinding"
                   contract="IMyService" />

As mentioned previously when you provide absolute addresses then your base addresses won't be consulted in generating an endpoint address.

You may want to have a look at this.

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How? i.e. details regaring the implementation –  ldgorman May 16 '12 at 10:47
    
Thanks, that clears it up perfectly. –  SLC May 16 '12 at 12:55
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Regarding multiple base addresses. How it chooses the right one, im not sure, but "You can also have multiple base addresses for a service, but each service is allowed only one base address for each transport" as you have observed, more info here.

You cannot have two base address of the same type.

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I maybe misunderstanding slightly but if you want to amend (and I dont know why you would!) that it associates a net.tcp address with nettcpbinding - you can do so in the protocolmapping section of your config file

as highlighted here

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The protocolMapping is for specifying which binding is used when default endpoints are being wired up. The address scheme (net.tcp for example) is defined by the transport channel –  Richard Blewett May 16 '12 at 10:29
    
If you want, you can force all net.tcp addresses to be served by basicHttpBinding - my answer was more along the lines for this part of the question : "I'm wondering how it associates those base addresses with the endpoints. Since your endpoint specifies tcp or http, why are the base addresses prefixed with net.tcp and http?" - thats where it associates addresses by endpoints... isnt it? (stand to be corrected!) –  Chris May 16 '12 at 10:40
    
As I said - protocolMapping is about default endpoints - the addressing scheme is a feature of the transport channel. If protocol mapping was used then how would the address scheme http:// (and therefore base address) be used for BasicHttpBinding, WSHttpBinding, WSDualHttpBinding, WSFederationHttpBinding, WebHttpBinding at the same time –  Richard Blewett May 16 '12 at 10:46
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