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Consider a table with id,date datetime,value double, I have data in the table every minute.

I'm trying to use mysql to identify "events" where value > 10 continuously for more than 3 hours.

At the time I am using the query:

select date from table where value > 10;

Then I manually read where the dates are continuously.

Example of "event":

Date             - value
2000/01/01 00:00 - 5
2000/01/01 01:00 - 5
2000/01/01 02:00 - 5
2000/01/01 03:00 - 11
2000/01/01 04:00 - 11
2000/01/01 05:00 - 11
2000/01/01 06:00 - 5
2000/01/01 07:00 - 5
2000/01/01 08:00 - 5
2000/01/01 09:00 - 11
2000/01/01 10:00 - 11
2000/01/01 11:00 - 5

In this case there is one "event" between 03:00 and 05:00.

Thanks for all input!

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1  
wait.. what?.... –  sree May 16 '12 at 8:42
    
I am sorry if you find the question poorly described. In the table there are several years of satellite data with data every minute. I have all the data in a mysql table, and I want to identify events where e.g. the magnetic field strength is over a a certain value for a continuous period of time. (In space physics such periods are often explained as magnetic clouds in the solar wind). –  Paulten May 16 '12 at 11:50
    
Are the data regular? Can there be omitted minutes? –  Andriy M May 16 '12 at 16:47
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In MySQL, you can assign variables in a SELECT statement while retrieving data. This functionality helps in solving many problems where one would "normally" use windowing functions (which MySQL doesn't have). It can also help in yours. Here's a solution I ended up with:

SET @startdate = CAST(NULL AS datetime);
SET @granularity = 60;   /* minutes */
SET @minduration = 180;  /* minutes */
SET @minvalue = 10;

SELECT
  t.Date,
  t.Value
FROM (
  SELECT
    StartDate,
    MAX(Date) AS EndDate
  FROM (
    SELECT
      Date,
      Value,
      CASE
        WHEN Value > @minvalue OR @startdate IS NOT NULL
        THEN IFNULL(@startdate, Date)
      END AS StartDate,
      @startdate := CASE
        WHEN Value > @minvalue
        THEN IFNULL(@startdate, Date)
      END AS s
    FROM (
      SELECT Date, Value FROM YourTable
      UNION ALL
      SELECT MAX(Date) + INTERVAL @granularity MINUTE, @minvalue FROM YourTable
    ) s
    ORDER BY Date
  ) s
  WHERE StartDate IS NOT NULL
  GROUP BY StartDate
) s
  INNER JOIN YourTable t ON t.Date >= s.StartDate AND t.Date < s.EndDate
WHERE s.EndDate >= s.StartDate + INTERVAL @minduration MINUTE
;

Three of the four variables used here are merely script arguments, and only one, @startdate, actually gets both assigned and checked in the query.

Basically, the query iterates over the rows, marking those where the value is greater than a specific minimum (@minvalue), eventually producing a list of time ranges during which values matched the condition. Actually, in order to calculate the ending bounds correctly, non-matching rows that immediately follow groups of the matching ones are also included in the respective groups. Because of that, an extra row is being added to the original dataset, where Date is calculated off the latest Date plus the specified @granularity of timestamps in your table and Value is just @minvalue.

Once obtained, the list of ranges is joined back to the original table to retrieve the detail rows that fall in between the ranges' bounds, the ranges that are not long enough (as specified by @minduration) being filtered out along the way.

If you run this solution on SQL Fiddle, you will see the following output:

DATE                            VALUE
------------------------------  -----
January, 01 2000 03:00:00-0800  11
January, 01 2000 04:00:00-0800  11
January, 01 2000 05:00:00-0800  11

which, I understand, is what you would expect.

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excellent solution! Thanks for the explanation! Much appreciated –  Paulten May 18 '12 at 5:59
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select count(*) from table where DATE_SUB(CURDATE(),INTERVAL 3 HOUR) < `date`

select count(*) from table where DATE_SUB(CURDATE(),INTERVAL 3 HOUR) < `date` AND `value` > 10

Then compare the result, if not same, then is not continuously.

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Wild guess:

select * from 
    (select event, MAX(date) as date from table where value > 10 group by event) maxs
inner join 
    (select event, MIN(date) as date from table where value > 10 group by event) mins
on maxs.event = mins.event
where (time_to_sec(timediff(maxes.date, mins.date)) / 3600) > 3
share|improve this answer
    
If an event is under 10 for ten hours, then over ten for 4 hours, then under ten for 6 hours, the results should show (to the best of my understanding) that the event was over 10 for 4 hours. –  MatBailie May 16 '12 at 9:01
    
Thank you for the suggestion! consider a similar example as @Dems provided: Date - value 2000/01/01 00:00 - 5 2000/01/01 01:00 - 5 2000/01/01 02:00 - 5 2000/01/01 03:00 - 11 2000/01/01 04:00 - 11 2000/01/01 05:00 - 11 2000/01/01 06:00 - 5 2000/01/01 07:00 - 5 2000/01/01 08:00 - 5 2000/01/01 09:00 - 11 2000/01/01 10:00 - 11 2000/01/01 11:00 - 5 In this list there is one "event" lasting three hours. In this case the MAX(date) would return 2000/01/01 10:00 while MIN(date) returning 2000/01/01 03:00. I will post again when I have done further investigation. Thanks! –  Paulten May 16 '12 at 12:38
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