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I've created a remote desktop control application. Obviously, it consists of client and server parts:

Server:

  • Receiving mouse/keyboard actions from client;
  • Sending screenshot of desktop to client.

Client:

  • Receiving screenshot from server;
  • Sending mouse/keyboard actions;

Consider sending the screenshot. When I use my home PC as a server - I end up with a 1920x1080 screenshot dimension. By using JAI Image I/O Tools and encoding it as PNG I was able to achieve the following stats for such a big image:

  1. Write time ~0.2 s; (not into socket, but into some "regular" output stream, i. e. encode time)
  2. Read time ~0.05 s; (not from socket, but from some "regular" input stream, i. e. decode time)
  3. Size ~250 KB;
  4. Perfect quality.

As a result, according to #1 - the ideal possible FPS should be ~5.

Unfortunately, I'm not able to achieve even those ~5 FPS, not even 2 FPS. I searched for the bottleneck and found out that writing/reading to/from socket I/O streams takes up to ~2 s (See appendix 1 and 2 for clarification). Surely that is unacceptable.

I've researched the topic a bit - and added buffering of socket's I/O streams (with BufferedInputStream and BufferedOutputStream) on both sides. I've started with 64 KB sizes. This indeed improved performance. But still can't have at least 2 FPS! In addition, I've experimented with Socket#setReceiveBufferSize and Socket#setSendBufferSize and there were some changes in speed, but I don't know how exactly they behave, therefore I don't know which values to use.

Look at initialization code:

Server:

    ServerSocket serverSocket = new ServerSocket();
    serverSocket.setReceiveBufferSize( ? ); // #1
    serverSocket.bind(new InetSocketAddress(...));

    Socket clientSocket = serverSocket.accept();
    clientSocket.setSendBufferSize( ? ); // #2
    clientSocket.setReceiveBufferSize( ? ); // #3

    OutputStream outputStream = new BufferedOutputStream(
            clientSocket.getOutputStream(), ? ); // #4
    InputStream inputStream = new BufferedInputStream(
            clientSocket.getInputStream(), ? ); // #5

Client:

    Socket socket = new Socket(...);
    socket.setSendBufferSize( ? ); // #6
    socket.setReceiveBufferSize( ? ); // #7

    OutputStream outputStream = new BufferedOutputStream(
            socket.getOutputStream(), ? ); // #8
    InputStream inputStream = new BufferedInputStream(
            socket.getInputStream(), ? ); // #9

Questions:

  1. Which values would you recommend (to improve performance) for all these cases and why?
  2. Please clarify Socket#setReceiveBufferSize and Socket#setSendBufferSize behavior.
  3. What other methods/techniques can you advise to improve performance of such application?
  4. Skype provides good-quality real-time desktop transmission - how do they do it?

Appendix 1: Adding the unrolled pseudo-code of client socket reading (@mcfinnigan):

while(true) {
    // objectInputStream is wrapping socket's buffered input stream.
    Object object = objectInputStream.readObject(); // <--- Bottleneck (without setting proper buffer sizes is ~2 s)

    if(object == null)
        continue;

    if(object.getClass() == ImageCapsule.class) {
        ImageCapsule imageCapsule = (ImageCapsule)object;

        screen = imageCapsule.read(); // <--- Decode PNG (~0.05 s)

        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                repaint();
            }
        });
    }
}

Appendix 2: Adding the unrolled pseudo-code of server socket writing (@EJP):

while(true) {
    // objectOutputStream is wrapping socket's buffered output stream.
    BufferedImage screen = ... // obtaining screenshot
    ImageCapsule imageCapsule = new ImageCapsule();

    imageCapsule.write(screen, formatName()); // <--- Encode PNG (~0.2 s)

    try {
        objectOutputStream.writeObject(imageCapsule); // <--- Bottleneck (without setting proper buffer sizes is ~2 s)
    }
    finally {
        objectOutputStream.flush();
        objectOutputStream.reset(); // Reset to free written objects.
    }
}

Conclusion:

Thanks for your answers, specially EJP - he made things a bit more clear to me. If you are like me - seeking answers on how to tweak sockets' performance you should definitely check TCP/IP Sockets in Java, Second Edition: Practical Guide for Programmers, especially chapter 6 "Under the Hood" which describes what happens behind the scenes of *Socket classes, how send and receive buffers are managed and utilized (which are primary keys to performance).

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Are you sure the socket settings are your limiting factors? What kind of connection do you have between your client and your server? What is the up speed from your server? –  Roger Lindsjö May 16 '12 at 8:51
    
Can you post the code where you read from the sockets on the client side? –  mcfinnigan May 16 '12 at 8:55
2  
    
@Roger Lindsjö What do you you mean by "what kind of connection"? How can I measure up speed of my server? –  Haroogan May 16 '12 at 9:12
    
Why are you testing for null? and continuing? Are you expecting to write a null to the ObjectOutputStream? –  EJP May 16 '12 at 9:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
Write time ~0.2 s;
Read time ~0.05 s;

These objectives are completely meaningless without consideration of the latency and bandwidths of the intervening network.

Size ~250 KB;

Off topic. Image size is up to you, and it has no relationship to actual programming, which is the purpose of this site.

Perfect quality.

'Perfect quality' only requires that you don't drop any bits, which you won't get anyway via TCP.

  serverSocket.setReceiveBufferSize( ? ); // #1

That sets the receive buffer size for all accepted sockets. Set it as large as you can afford, over 64k if possible.

socket.setSendBufferSize( ? ); // #6

Set this as large as you can afford, over 64k if possible.

    socket.setReceiveBufferSize( ? ); // #7

As this is an accepted socket you have already done this above. Remove.

    OutputStream outputStream = new BufferedOutputStream(
            socket.getOutputStream(), ? ); // #8
    InputStream inputStream = new BufferedInputStream(
            socket.getInputStream(), ? ); // #9

The defaults for these are 8k which is normally enough; as long as you have decent socket buffer sizes that should be enough.

Which values would you recommend (to improve performance) for all these cases and why?

See above.

Please clarify Socket#setReceiveBufferSize and Socket#setSendBufferSize behavior.

They control the size of the TCP 'window'. It's a fairly abstruse topic but the idea is to get the size at least equal to the bandwidth-delay product of your network, i.e. bandwidth in bytes/second times delay in seconds >= buffer size in bytes.

What other methods/techniques can you advise to improve performance of such application?

Don't futz around with sleeps and doing other tasks while sending data. Send it as fast as you can in the tightest possible loop you can arrange.

Skype provides good-quality real-time desktop transmission - how do they do it?

Off topic and probably unknowable unless a Skype employee happens to want to give away company secrets here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this information. However, I have to disagree with you about image write/read times. Look into original post - I've added clarification there. These are writes/reads not into socket itself, but to "regular" I/O streams. Therefore this time shows average time required to encode/decode PNG. Think about it - I cannot send PNG faster than every ~0.2 s - no matter what is the speed of the connection; I cannot read PNG faster than every ~0.05 s - no matter what is the speed of the connection; –  Haroogan May 16 '12 at 9:36
    
@Haroogan My point is that you can't read or write any faster than the network, so specifying times for each is futile. –  EJP May 16 '12 at 9:40
    
The same goes about the size of the image - I felt like this is important for considering sizes for buffers, isn't it? –  Haroogan May 16 '12 at 9:41
    
@Haroogan No, why? The only important thing is the TCP window size, which is determined by the size of the receive buffer of the receiver. –  EJP May 16 '12 at 9:42
    
It's the opposite actually - you may tweak network - make it faster. But in general case - you can do nothing about encode/decode times of PNG. Therefore, in this case, encode/decode (write/read) times for PNG dictate the minimum transfer time, and networking has an additional (secondary) impact, which I'm currently trying to mitigate. –  Haroogan May 16 '12 at 9:47
  • If client opens new TCP connection for each image, then TCP slow start may cause the slowness. --> Use same TCP connection for all frames.

  • TCP have own buffers which are used optimal way for TCP --> BufferedOutputStream gives sometimes benefit and some times not.

  • Usually only small part of screen is changed between screenshots. --> Transfer only changed parts.

share|improve this answer
    
I know that #3 is a very good speed-up, but it is something that is difficult to implement - and I'm no expert in that kind of problems (that's why it will be my last consideration). #1 is of no discussion. #2 is interesting - are you sure? –  Haroogan May 16 '12 at 10:02
    
#2 is incorrect according to my observations. Using buffered streams is EXTREMELY important - it provides significant performance boost for i/o operations on sockets. –  Haroogan May 16 '12 at 16:35
    
@Haroogan : Ok, I will remove the #2. But remember to use flush() after writing image to BufferedOutputStream. –  User1 May 18 '12 at 6:59
    
I'm writing ImageCapsule (inside it contains byte array with encoded image) into ObjectOutputStream which in turn wraps BufferedOutputStream which wraps GZIPOutputStream which finally wraps socket's OutputStream :) Therefore, I can flush only on ObjectOutputStream. But I suppose that it results in a chain of flush calls to respective streams in wrapping chain, doesn't it? –  Haroogan May 18 '12 at 17:40

I think the greatest bandwith waste will lie in the complete transfer of the desktop. You should treat this more like a film and make differential encoding of frames.

The drawback is the more complicated handling. Maybe there are some simple video codec APIs/implementations out there?

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You could look at Java NIO (http://www.cs.brown.edu/courses/cs161/papers/j-nio-ltr.pdf), use more than one channel, etc.

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The question is clear. Somebody above me suggests the usage of multiple nio channels, I'd rather use multiple blocking socket (nio is not faster). However this is not improving net comm, this is parallel programming that definitely would be a good solution in your case. Let me suggest the following

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/net/Socket.html#setTcpNoDelay(boolean)

setting it to true, you'll be able to speed the socket comm up at the cost of an increase in bandwidth consumption.

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