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Why java allows to use the labled break inside a method? Is there any special purpose or use of this? I thought it can be only use within the loops and swtches.

public void testMeth(int count){
   label:
   break label;
}

But below gives a compiler error.

public void testMeth(int count){
    break; // This gives an Error : break cannot be used outside of a loop or a switch
}
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IMO, avoid using a break as a goto statement since they're more trouble than they're worth in the long run. I hate having to work with code that is filled up with goto statements. –  ChadNC May 16 '12 at 12:09
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't know the why, but the behaviour is specified in the Java Language Specification #14.15:

Break with no label

A break statement with no label attempts to transfer control to the innermost enclosing switch, while, do, or for statement of the immediately enclosing method or initializer; this statement, which is called the break target, then immediately completes normally.
If no switch, while, do, or for statement in the immediately enclosing method, constructor, or initializer contains the break statement, a compile-time error occurs.

Break with label (emphasis mine)

A break statement with label Identifier attempts to transfer control to the enclosing labeled statement (§14.7) that has the same Identifier as its label; this statement, which is called the break target, then immediately completes normally. In this case, the break target need not be a switch, while, do, or for statement.

Breaks with label enable you to redirect the code after a whole block (which can be a loop), which can be useful in the case of nested loops. It is however different from the C goto statement:

Unlike C and C++, the Java programming language has no goto statement; identifier statement labels are used with break (§14.15) or continue (§14.16) statements appearing anywhere within the labeled statement.

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You can use this to break out of nested loops immediately:

out: { 
         for( int row=0; row< max; row++ ) {
             for( int col=0; col< max; col++ )
                 if( row == limit) break out;
             j += 1;
         }
     }

Using break outside of loops does not make a whole lot of sense, where would you be breaking of? To break out of a void function you can use return as adarshr points out.

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I think the question is about using break outside a loop. –  assylias May 16 '12 at 11:51
    
@ ChristopheD : yeah dude. I know that (As I mentioned earlierly). But my question is why is it allowed to use within a method without inside a loop or a switch statement –  Namalak May 16 '12 at 11:51
    
@ assylias : Yes assylias that's my problem –  Namalak May 16 '12 at 11:52
    
@NamalFernando: Ok, read too fast, I've update the answer a little... –  ChristopheD May 16 '12 at 12:08
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You can use labeled breaks to get out of nested loops, like here.

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Because there is the return statement for use outside the loops!

public void testMeth(int count){
    if(count < 0) {
        return;
    }

    // do something with count
}
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I found one crazy use by my self.

public void testMeth(int count){
    label: if (true) {
          System.out.println("Before break");
          if (count == 2) break label;
          System.out.println("After break");
    }
    System.out.println("After IF");
}

OR

public void testMeth(int count){

    namedBlock: {
        System.out.println("Before break");
        if (count == 0) break namedBlock;
        System.out.println("After break");
    }

    System.out.println("After Block");
}

This ignores the "After break".

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Here is yet another example of when labels are useful outside the context of a loop:

boolean cond1 = ...
if (cond1) {
    boolean cond1 = ...
    if (cond2) {
        boolean cond3 = ...
        if (cond3) {
            bar();
        } else {
            baz();
        }
    } else {
        baz();
    }
} else {
    baz();
}

...becomes...

label: {
    boolean cond1 = ...
    if (cond1) {
        boolean cond1 = ...
        if (cond2) {
            boolean cond3 = ...
            if (cond3) {
                bar();
                break label;
            }
        }
    }
    baz();
}

A contrived example, obviously, but slightly more readable. My recommendation is that if you feel the need to use a label, pretty much ever, you should otherwise refactor the code.

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