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Here is a problem. I have seen many solutions, but no one seems to be fulfilling the criteria I want...

I want to display the age in this format

20 y(s) 2 m(s) 20 d(s)
20 y(s) 2 m(s)
2 m(s) 20 d(s)
20 d(s)

etc...

I have tried several solutions, but the leap year is causing the problem with me. My unit tests are always being failed because of leap years and no matter how many days come in between, the leap yeas count for extra number of days.

Here is my code....

public static string AgeDiscription(DateTime dateOfBirth)
{
    var today = DateTime.Now;
    var days = GetNumberofDaysUptoNow(dateOfBirth);
    var months = 0;
    var years = 0;
    if (days > 365)
    {
        years = today.Year - dateOfBirth.Year;
        days = days % 365;
    }
    if (days > DateTime.DaysInMonth(today.Year, today.Month))
    {
        months = Math.Abs(today.Month - dateOfBirth.Month);
        for (int i = 0; i < months; i++)
        {
            days -= DateTime.DaysInMonth(today.Year, today.AddMonths(0 - i).Month);
        }
    }

    var ageDescription = new StringBuilder("");

    if (years != 0)
        ageDescription = ageDescription.Append(years + " y(s) ");
    if (months != 0)
        ageDescription = ageDescription.Append(months + " m(s) ");
    if (days != 0)
        ageDescription = ageDescription.Append(days + " d(s) ");

    return ageDescription.ToString();
}

public static int GetNumberofDaysUptoNow(DateTime dateOfBirth)
{
    var today = DateTime.Now;
    var timeSpan = today - dateOfBirth;
    var nDays = timeSpan.Days;
    return nDays;
}

Any ideas???

UPDATE:

I want the difference between the two dates as:

var dateOfBirth = DateTime.Now.AddYears(-20);
string expected = "20 y(s) ";
string actual; // returns 20 y(s) 5 d(s)
actual = Globals.AgeDiscription(dateOfBirth);
Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of How do I calculate someone's age in C#? –  Magnus May 16 '12 at 12:15
    
This has been asked too many times, you didn't find any of them helpful ? –  V4Vendetta May 16 '12 at 12:21
    
@V4Vendetta unfortunately, this has never been asked this way. I mean, the issue is something else, let me update my description... –  Naveed Butt May 16 '12 at 12:30
1  
@NaveedButt, how is your question different? –  jrummell May 16 '12 at 12:39
1  
@jrummell see the comment by HackedByChinese, he has made it quite clear, the difference between his and others' answers... My users need precise age –  Naveed Butt May 16 '12 at 12:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Age is pretty tricky. Here's the relevant excerpts from a struct I use.

public struct Age
{
    private readonly Int32 _years;
    private readonly Int32 _months;
    private readonly Int32 _days;
    private readonly Int32 _totalDays;

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of <see cref="Age"/>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="start">The date and time when the age started.</param>
    /// <param name="end">The date and time when the age ended.</param>
    /// <remarks>This </remarks>
    public Age(DateTime start, DateTime end)
        : this(start, end, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.Calendar)
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of <see cref="Age"/>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="start">The date and time when the age started.</param>
    /// <param name="end">The date and time when the age ended.</param>
    /// <param name="calendar">Calendar used to calculate age.</param>
    public Age(DateTime start, DateTime end, Calendar calendar)
    {
        if (start > end) throw new ArgumentException("The starting date cannot be later than the end date.");

        var startDate = start.Date;
        var endDate = end.Date;

        _years = _months = _days = 0;
        _days += calendar.GetDayOfMonth(endDate) - calendar.GetDayOfMonth(startDate);
        if (_days < 0)
        {
            _days += calendar.GetDaysInMonth(calendar.GetYear(startDate), calendar.GetMonth(startDate));
            _months--;
        }
        _months += calendar.GetMonth(endDate) - calendar.GetMonth(startDate);
        if (_months < 0)
        {
            _months += calendar.GetMonthsInYear(calendar.GetYear(startDate));
            _years--;
        }
        _years += calendar.GetYear(endDate) - calendar.GetYear(startDate);

        var ts = endDate.Subtract(startDate);
        _totalDays = (Int32)ts.TotalDays;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the number of whole years something has aged.
    /// </summary>
    public Int32 Years
    {
        get { return _years; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the number of whole months something has aged past the value of <see cref="Years"/>.
    /// </summary>
    public Int32 Months
    {
        get { return _months; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the age as an expression of whole months.
    /// </summary>
    public Int32 TotalMonths
    {
        get { return _years * 12 + _months; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the number of whole weeks something has aged past the value of <see cref="Years"/> and <see cref="Months"/>.
    /// </summary>
    public Int32 Days
    {
        get { return _days; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the total number of days that have elapsed since the start and end dates.
    /// </summary>
    public Int32 TotalDays
    {
        get { return _totalDays; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the number of whole weeks something has aged past the value of <see cref="Years"/> and <see cref="Months"/>.
    /// </summary>
    public Int32 Weeks
    {
        get { return (Int32) Math.Floor((Decimal) _days/7); }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the age as an expression of whole weeks.
    /// </summary>
    public Int32 TotalWeeks
    {
        get { return (Int32) Math.Floor((Decimal) _totalDays/7); }
    }
}

Here's an example unit test that passes:

    [Test]
    public void Should_be_exactly_20_years_old()
    {
        var now = DateTime.Now;
        var age = new Age(now.AddYears(-20), now);

        Assert.That(age, Has.Property("Years").EqualTo(20)
            .And.Property("Months").EqualTo(0)
            .And.Property("Days").EqualTo(0));
    }
share|improve this answer
    
so, would this return 20 y(s), when passed start=DateTime.Now.AddYears(-20) and end=DateTime.Now? I doubt it. I think it would return 20 y(s) 5 d(s) –  Naveed Butt May 16 '12 at 12:26
    
I have lots of unit tests covering this. It works :) –  HackedByChinese May 16 '12 at 12:33
    
Updated to include a unit test for your example. I wrote this for medical software, where users were very picky about how age is displayed (the approximations suggested in other answers are not adequate). –  HackedByChinese May 16 '12 at 12:39
    
Thanks for your answer. That is very correct. Thank you again... –  Naveed Butt May 16 '12 at 12:56

Use

Timespan interval = DateTime.Now - DateOfBirth;

Then use

interval.Days
interval.TotalDays;
interval.Hours;
interval.TotalHours;
interval.Minutes;
interval.TotalMinutes;
interval.Seconds;
interval.TotalSeconds;
interval.Milliseconds;
interval.TotalMilliseconds;
interval.Ticks;

to get desired result.

share|improve this answer
    
that won't give me any details corresponding to the description above... :( –  Naveed Butt May 16 '12 at 12:12
    
This is not valid for determining age as it applies to people. –  HackedByChinese May 16 '12 at 12:12
    
I might need only a little fix in my code above, if you could guide me... –  Naveed Butt May 16 '12 at 12:14
    
Year part using TimeSpan indeed ambitious ! ! Look closely there is a line which is var timeSpan = today - dateOfBirth; –  V4Vendetta May 16 '12 at 12:15
    
Does not answer the question. –  Matthew Watson May 16 '12 at 12:27
static int AgeInYears(DateTime birthday, DateTime today)
{
    return ((today.Year - birthday.Year) * 372 + (today.Month - birthday.Month) * 31 + (today.Day - birthday.Day)) / 372;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Age in years is not a problem. I want Age in Years, Months, Days –  Naveed Butt May 16 '12 at 12:29
    
Doesn't really make sense though... Think about it - two people may be the exact same age in days, but when you convert it to years, months and days then the number of months and days part could differ depending on when the people were born. Someone born in February versus someone born in January, for example. –  Matthew Watson May 16 '12 at 13:01
    
whether it makes sense or not, this is the user's requirement :( I am sorry, but thanks to @HackedByChinese I've got my answer :) –  Naveed Butt May 16 '12 at 13:07

write this small function to have the number of leap year days between the current year and the date of birth year and add the returned days to the days part of your age:

 private static int NumberOfLeapYears(int startYear, int endYear)
 {         
 int counter = 0;
 for (int year = startYear; year <= endYear; year++)
 counter += DateTime.IsLeapYear(year) ? 1 : 0;
 return counter;
 } 
share|improve this answer
    
This would fail in case of a century year or a millenia year. This would only give the number of leap years and one will have to do a loop over the century years or millenia years as well and then put some more logic regarding overlapping century, millenia and leap years... –  Naveed Butt Mar 21 '13 at 4:05

Check this code:

{                                                    
    dif = int(datediff("D", Convert.ToDateTime("01/" + Q101m.text + "/" + Q101y.Text), (Convert.ToDateTime(Vdate.text)))/365.25)

    //If dif < 15 Or dif > 49 
    {
           MessageBox.Show("xxxxxxx");
           Q101m.Focus();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to StackOverflow! Your answer doesn't really address the question, or at least not very clearly. Have a read of stackoverflow.com/questions/how-to-answer –  Tass Mar 21 '13 at 3:44

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