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I have a csv file like this:

ELAPSEDTIME_SEC;CPU_%;RSS_KBYTES
0;3.4;420012
1;3.4;420012
2;3.4;420012
3;3.4;420012
4;3.4;420012
5;3.4;420012

And I'd like to convert the values (they are seconds) in the first column to hh:mm:ss format (or whatever Excel or LibreOffice can import as time format from csv) and insert it back to the file into a new column following the first. So the output would be something like this:

ELAPSEDTIME_SEC;ELAPSEDTIME_HH:MM:SS;CPU_%;RSS_KBYTES
0;0:00:00;3.4;420012
1;0:00:01;3.4;420012
2;0:00:02;3.4;420012
3;0:00:03;3.4;420012
4;0:00:04;3.4;420012
5;0:00:05;3.4;420012

And I'd have to do this in Bash to work under Linux and OS X as well.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I hope this is what you want:

TZ=UTC awk -F';' -vOFS=';' '
{
    $1 = $1 ";" (NR==1 ? "ELAPSEDTIME_HH:MM:SS" : strftime("%H:%M:%S", $1))
}1' input.csv
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Just add NR >= 1 (for parsing the 1st column) ... it works perfectly fine with the given input !! –  Debaditya May 16 '12 at 13:33
    
Thanks for the answer. Works like a charm. Any idea, how to place ELAPSEDTIME_HH:MM:SS in the second column in the first line? –  szantaii May 16 '12 at 14:45
    
You can write a NR==1{...} –  kev May 16 '12 at 14:47
    
@kev, could you write it for me? I'm just not an awk guy. :) –  szantaii May 16 '12 at 15:04
    
@kev, can you help me once more? There is no strftime on OS X's awk. I've managed to convert seconds to HH:MM:SS format, but how can I insert it back to as a new second column? –  szantaii May 17 '12 at 7:41

By thinking about your question I found an interesting manipulation possibility: Insert a formula into the CSV, and how to pass it to ooCalc:

cat se.csv | while read line ; do  n=$((n+1)) ; ((n>1)) && echo ${line/;/';"=time(0;0;$A$'$n')";'} ||echo ${line/;/;time of A;} ;done > se2.csv 

formatted:

cat se.csv | while read line ; do
  n=$((n+1))
  ((n>1)) && echo ${line/;/';"=time(0;0;$A$'$n')";'} || echo ${line/;/;time of A;}
done > se2.csv

Remarks:

  • This adds a column - it doesn't replace
  • You have to set the import options for CSV correctly. In this case:
    • delimiter = semicolon (well, we had to do this for the original file as well)
    • text delimiter = " (wasn't the default)
    • deactivate checkbox "quoted field as text"
  • depending on your locale, the function name has to be translated. For example, in German I had to use "zeit(" instead of "time("
  • since formulas use semicolons themselves the approach will be simpler, not needing that much masking, if the delimiter is something else, maybe a tab.
  • In practice, you might treat the headline like all the other lines, and correct it manually in the end, but the audience of SO expects everything to work out of the box, so the command became something longer.
  • I would have preferred to replace the whole while read / cat/ loop thing with just a short sed '...' command, and I found a remark in the man page of sed, that = can be used for the rownum, but I don't know how to handle it.

Result:

cat se2.csv
ELAPSEDTIME_SEC;time of A;CPU_%;RSS_KBYTES
0;"=time(0;0;$A$2)";3.4;420012
1;"=time(0;0;$A$3)";3.4;420012
2;"=time(0;0;$A$4)";3.4;420012
3;"=time(0;0;$A$5)";3.4;420012
4;"=time(0;0;$A$6)";3.4;420012
5;"=time(0;0;$A$7)";3.4;420012

In this specific case, the awk-solution seems better, but I guess this approach might sometimes be useful to know.

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