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Is there something like short if else = (cond) ? true : false statement, but to pass the result of condition to { }? Or maybe some other ideas how to write this kind of code more elegant?

double t_day = day * 0.15;
if (t_day < 1) { t_day = 1; }

maybe something like

double t_day = (day * 0.15) ? day * 0.15 : 1;

but without additional calculating?

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9  
Looks like std::max. –  Fanael May 16 '12 at 13:19
10  
This is a great example of "meaningless optimization". Either one is fine. Stick to the one that makes the code more readable to you. –  duffymo May 16 '12 at 13:20
2  
looks like a typo in double t_day = (day * 0.15) ? day * 0.15 : 1; - did you mean (day * 0.15) > 1 ? (That might hint as to which one you find easiest to write correctly) –  Flexo May 16 '12 at 13:20
5  
@duffymo: Bear in mind that the point is not optimization, but not having to repeat the 0.15 twice (which is dangerous). –  Alexandre C. May 16 '12 at 13:22
3  
You can put your entire program on one line if you want, save preprocessor directives. Then it would be super readable. –  Benjamin Lindley May 16 '12 at 13:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted
double t_day = std::max(day * 0.15, 1.);

Don't forget the period after the 1 as the compiler will not be able to deduce the correct double template parameter (and you end up with weird compiler errors).

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5  
Alternatively (to the . at the end) you can ask for a particular specialization: std::max<double>(day*0.15,1) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 16 '12 at 13:49
1  
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas nice note. thanks, does not know this before. –  abrahab May 16 '12 at 14:30

Given the three functions:

double func1(const double& day) {
  double t_day = day * 0.15;
  if (t_day < 1) { t_day = 1; }
  return t_day;
}

double func2(const double& day) {
  return std::max(day*0.15, 1.);
}

double func3(const double& day) {
  return (day * 0.15 > 1) ? day * 0.15 : 1;
}

We can inspect the output from the compiler (e.g. g++ -O3 -S):

func1 becomes:

_Z5func1RKd:
.LFB368:
        .cfi_startproc
        movsd   .LC1(%rip), %xmm0
        movsd   .LC0(%rip), %xmm1
        mulsd   (%rdi), %xmm0
        maxsd   %xmm0, %xmm1
        movapd  %xmm1, %xmm0
        ret

func2 becomes:

_Z5func2RKd:
.LFB370:
        .cfi_startproc
        movsd   .LC1(%rip), %xmm0
        movsd   .LC0(%rip), %xmm1
        mulsd   (%rdi), %xmm0
        maxsd   %xmm0, %xmm1
        movapd  %xmm1, %xmm0
        ret

and func3 becomes:

_Z5func3RKd:
.LFB369:
        .cfi_startproc
        movsd   .LC1(%rip), %xmm0
        mulsd   (%rdi), %xmm0
        maxsd   .LC0(%rip), %xmm0
        ret

Where LC0 and LC1 are the constants 1.0 and 0.15.

For reference Clang's intermediate representation might be easier to read:

define double @_Z5func1RKd(double* nocapture %day) nounwind uwtable readonly {
  %1 = load double* %day, align 8, !tbaa !0
  %2 = fmul double %1, 1.500000e-01
  %3 = fcmp olt double %2, 1.000000e+00
  %t_day.0 = select i1 %3, double 1.000000e+00, double %2
  ret double %t_day.0
}

define double @_Z5func2RKd(double* nocapture %day) nounwind uwtable readonly {
  %1 = load double* %day, align 8, !tbaa !0
  %2 = fmul double %1, 1.500000e-01
  %3 = fcmp olt double %2, 1.000000e+00
  %4 = select i1 %3, double 1.000000e+00, double %2
  ret double %4
}

define double @_Z5func3RKd(double* nocapture %day) nounwind uwtable readonly {
  %1 = load double* %day, align 8, !tbaa !0
  %2 = fmul double %1, 1.500000e-01
  %3 = fcmp ogt double %2, 1.000000e+00
  %4 = select i1 %3, double %2, double 1.000000e+00
  ret double %4
}

Conclusion:

They all become a mulsd and maxsd however you write it. Invest your time in writing things the most natural, easiest to get correct way and let the compiler worry about details like this. I'd say it's std::max in this instance since what you're doing is taking the bigger of two values.

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great comparison! :) thanks –  abrahab May 16 '12 at 13:36

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