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(C# )When the Client tries to connect to a disconnected IP address, there is a long timeout over 15 seconds... How can we reduce this timeout? What is the method to config it?

The code I'm using to set up a socket connection is as following:

try
{
    m_clientSocket = new Socket(
         AddressFamily.InterNetwork,
         SocketType.Stream,
         ProtocolType.Tcp);

    IPAddress ip = IPAddress.Parse(serverIp);
    int iPortNo = System.Convert.ToInt16(serverPort);
    IPEndPoint ipEnd = new IPEndPoint(ip, iPortNo);

    m_clientSocket.Connect(ipEnd);
    if (m_clientSocket.Connected)
    {
        lb_connectStatus.Text = "Connection Established";
        WaitForServerData();
    }
}
catch (SocketException se)
{
    lb_connectStatus.Text = "Connection Failed";
    MessageBox.Show(se.Message);
}
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8 Answers

I found this. Simpler than the accepted answer, and works with .NET v2

Socket socket = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Stream, ProtocolType.Tcp);

// Connect using a timeout (5 seconds)

IAsyncResult result = socket.BeginConnect( sIP, iPort, null, null );

bool success = result.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne( 5000, true );

if ( !success )
{
            // NOTE, MUST CLOSE THE SOCKET

            socket.Close();
            throw new ApplicationException("Failed to connect server.");
}

// Success
//... 
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8  
OK, little input on this one-- I like this and its a lot less code.. however the !success isnt the correct condition. Instead, add if (!_socket.Connected) and it works much better. Ill give it a +1 for the less is more aspect. –  TravisWhidden Jan 28 '11 at 19:01
1  
This is very useful, as it seems. My issue is that I'm not sure what should I set as timeout. To big and checking process will take some time if I'm doing multiple ports. Too small it might be not enough to get the response. What you suggest? –  HelpNeeder Jan 24 '12 at 4:00
2  
Depends on your two end points. If they are both in a datacenter, then 1 second should be plenty, 3 for good measure, 10 to be kind. If one end is on a mobile device, such as a smartphone, then you might be looking at 30 seconds. –  FlappySocks Jan 24 '12 at 12:12
2  
Another thing too look out for... If instead of putting null in for the callback and you plan to EndConnect(), if the socket has been closed then this will give you an exception. So make sure you check... –  Andrew Jan 28 '13 at 16:50
5  
What if I want to INCREASE the timeout rather than to DECREASE it? I think async approach just lets you make the code not wait for 20 seconds (the internal timeout set in socket connect). But in case if the connection takes longer, the BeginConnect will stop anyway. Or, does BeginConnect internally waits forever? I have a very slow connection when sometimes it's required for up to 30-40 seconds to connect, and timeouts at 21st second occur very often. –  Alex Feb 22 '13 at 12:18
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I just wrote an extension class in order to allow timeouts in connections. Use it exactly as you would use the standard Connect() methods, with an extra parameter named timeout.

using System;
using System.Net;
using System.Net.Sockets;

/// <summary>
/// Extensions to Socket class
/// </summary>
public static class SocketExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Connects the specified socket.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="socket">The socket.</param>
    /// <param name="host">The host.</param>
    /// <param name="port">The port.</param>
    /// <param name="timeout">The timeout.</param>
    public static void Connect(this Socket socket, string host, int port, TimeSpan timeout)
    {
        AsyncConnect(socket, (s, a, o) => s.BeginConnect(host, port, a, o), timeout);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Connects the specified socket.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="socket">The socket.</param>
    /// <param name="addresses">The addresses.</param>
    /// <param name="port">The port.</param>
    /// <param name="timeout">The timeout.</param>
    public static void Connect(this Socket socket, IPAddress[] addresses, int port, TimeSpan timeout)
    {
        AsyncConnect(socket, (s, a, o) => s.BeginConnect(addresses, port, a, o), timeout);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Asyncs the connect.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="socket">The socket.</param>
    /// <param name="connect">The connect.</param>
    /// <param name="timeout">The timeout.</param>
    private static void AsyncConnect(Socket socket, Func<Socket, AsyncCallback, object, IAsyncResult> connect, TimeSpan timeout)
    {
        var asyncResult = connect(socket, null, null);
        if (!asyncResult.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout))
        {
            try
            {
                socket.EndConnect(asyncResult);
            }
            catch (SocketException)
            { }
            catch (ObjectDisposedException)
            { }
        }
    }
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5  
Fan of GhostDoc, are ya? ;-) "Asyncs the connect" - classic GhostDoc WTFness. –  KeithS Jun 24 '11 at 18:56
1  
:) yes, and sometimes not even a reader of what's been generated. –  picrap Jun 25 '11 at 22:30
    
Better socket.EndConnect than socket.Close ? –  Kiquenet Sep 16 '13 at 9:21
    
Any source code sample using your Extensions? –  Kiquenet Sep 16 '13 at 9:35
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My take:

public static class SocketExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Connects the specified socket.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="socket">The socket.</param>
    /// <param name="endpoint">The IP endpoint.</param>
    /// <param name="timeout">The timeout.</param>
    public static void Connect(this Socket socket, EndPoint endpoint, TimeSpan timeout)
    {
        var result = socket.BeginConnect(endpoint, null, null);

        bool success = result.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout, true);
        if (success)
        {
            socket.EndConnect(result);
        }
        else
        {
            socket.Close();
            throw new SocketException(10060); // Connection timed out.
        }
    }
}
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I took the liberty to handle a condition. Hope you don't mind. –  Hemant Jun 2 '12 at 4:56
    
Any source code sample using it ? –  Kiquenet Sep 16 '13 at 9:47
    
perfect. thank you for this answer –  Tom Beech 2 hours ago
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I dont program in C# but in C, we solve the same problem by making the socket non-blocking and then putting the fd in a select/poll loop with a timeout value equal to the amount of time we are willing to wait for the connect to succeed.

I found this for Visual C++ and the explanation there also bends towards the select/poll mechanism I explained before.

In my experience, you cannot change connect timeout values per socket. You change it for all (by tuning OS parameters).

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I solved the problem by using Socket.ConnectAsync Method instead of Socket.Connect Method. After invoking the Socket.ConnectAsync(SocketAsyncEventArgs), start a timer (timer_connection), if time is up, check whether socket connection is connected (if(m_clientSocket.Connected)), if not, pop up timeout error.

private void connect(string ipAdd,string port)
    {
        try
        {
            SocketAsyncEventArgs e=new SocketAsyncEventArgs();


            m_clientSocket = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Stream, ProtocolType.Tcp);

            IPAddress ip = IPAddress.Parse(serverIp);
            int iPortNo = System.Convert.ToInt16(serverPort);
            IPEndPoint ipEnd = new IPEndPoint(ip, iPortNo);

            //m_clientSocket.
            e.RemoteEndPoint = ipEnd;
            e.UserToken = m_clientSocket;
            e.Completed+=new EventHandler<SocketAsyncEventArgs>(e_Completed);                
            m_clientSocket.ConnectAsync(e);

            if (timer_connection != null)
            {
                timer_connection.Dispose();
            }
            else
            {
                timer_connection = new Timer();
            }
            timer_connection.Interval = 2000;
            timer_connection.Tick+=new EventHandler(timer_connection_Tick);
            timer_connection.Start();
        }
        catch (SocketException se)
        {
            lb_connectStatus.Text = "Connection Failed";
            MessageBox.Show(se.Message);
        }
    }
private void e_Completed(object sender,SocketAsyncEventArgs e)
    {
        lb_connectStatus.Text = "Connection Established";
        WaitForServerData();
    }
    private void timer_connection_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (!m_clientSocket.Connected)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Connection Timeout");
            //m_clientSocket = null;

            timer_connection.Stop();
        }
    }
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2  
When the timer stops, you show an error message right? How does this stop your TCP stack from actually connecting. Imagine a scenario, where a remote host is more than 2 seconds away i.e. rto > 2. Your timer will stop and you will print the error message. However, TCP is not controlled by your timer. It will still try to connect and may connect successfully after 2 seconds. Does C# provide a facility to cancel "connect" requests or a close on socket. Your timer solution is equal to checking after 2 second whether connection succeeded. –  Aditya Sehgal Jun 30 '09 at 10:11
    
I found this : splinter.com.au/blog/?p=28 Looks like this is the way. It is similar to yours but I think it does what I explained above. –  Aditya Sehgal Jul 1 '09 at 4:57
    
Hey! You guys found my blog! :) –  Chris Aug 11 '09 at 8:17
    
When it times out, you should call m_clientSocket.Close(); –  Vincent McNabb Jul 15 '10 at 6:07
    
Update, my blog link as referenced by aditya has changed: splinter.com.au/opening-a-tcp-connection-in-c-with-a-custom-t –  Chris May 10 '11 at 22:44
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I had the Same problem when connecting to a Socket and I came up with the below solution ,It works Fine for me. `

private bool CheckConnectivityForProxyHost(string hostName, int port)
       {
           if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(hostName))
               return false;

           bool isUp = false;
           Socket testSocket = null;

           try
           {

               testSocket = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Stream, ProtocolType.Tcp);
               IPAddress ip = null;
               if (testSocket != null && NetworkingCollaboratorBase.GetResolvedConnecionIPAddress(hostName, out ip))//Use a method to resolve your IP
               {
                   IPEndPoint ipEndPoint = new IPEndPoint(ip, port);

                   isUp = false;
//time out 5 Sec
                  CallWithTimeout(ConnectToProxyServers, 5000, testSocket, ipEndPoint);

                       if (testSocket != null && testSocket.Connected)
                       {
                           isUp = true;
                       }
                   }

               }
           }
           catch (Exception ex)
           {
               isUp = false;
           }
           finally
           {
               try
               {
                   if (testSocket != null)
                   {
                       testSocket.Shutdown(SocketShutdown.Both);
                   }
               }
               catch (Exception ex)
               {

               }
               finally
               {
                   if (testSocket != null)
                       testSocket.Close();
               }

           }

           return isUp;
       }


 private void CallWithTimeout(Action<Socket, IPEndPoint> action, int timeoutMilliseconds, Socket socket, IPEndPoint ipendPoint)
       {
           try
           {
               Action wrappedAction = () =>
               {
                   action(socket, ipendPoint);
               };

               IAsyncResult result = wrappedAction.BeginInvoke(null, null);

               if (result.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeoutMilliseconds))
               {
                   wrappedAction.EndInvoke(result);
               }

           }
           catch (Exception ex)
           {

           }
       }

  private void ConnectToProxyServers(Socket testSocket, IPEndPoint ipEndPoint)
       {
           try
           {
               if (testSocket == null || ipEndPoint == null)
                   return;

                   testSocket.Connect(ipEndPoint);

           }
           catch (Exception ex)
           {

           }
       } 
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Check this out on MSDN. It does not appear that you can do this with the implemented properties in the Socket class.

The poster on MSDN actually solved his problem using threading. He had a main thread which called out to other threads which run the connection code for a couple seconds and then check the Connected property of the socket:

I created another method wich actually connected the socket ... had the main thread sleep for 2 seconds and then check on the connecting method (wich is run in a separate thread) if the socket was connected good otherwise throw an exception "Timed out " and that;s all. Thanks again for the repleies.

What are you trying to do, and why can't it wait for 15-30 seconds before timing out?

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There should be a ReceiveTimeout property in the Socket class.

Socket.ReceiveTimeout Property

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I tried. It just doesn't work. I added m_clientSocket.ReceiveTimeout = 1000; before invoked the m_clientSocket.Connect(ipEnd). However, it still waits around 15-20 secs before popup the exception message. –  ninikin Jun 30 '09 at 6:57
    
This sets the timeout for when the socket is receiving data after the connection has been made. –  ecounysis Jun 30 '09 at 7:14
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