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I've recently been working on a system that needs to store and load large quantities of data, including single-precision floating-point values. I decided to standardise on network byte order for integers, and also decided to store floating point values in big-endian format, i.e.:

  |-- Byte 0 --| |-- Byte 1 -|  Byte 2   Byte 3
  #      ####### #     ####### ######## ########
Sign     Exponent          Mantissa
 1b    8b, MSB first    23b, MSB first

Ideally, I want to provide functions like htonl() and ntohl(), since I have already been using these for swabbing integers, and I also want to implement this in a way that has as much platform-independence as possible (while assuming that the float type corresponds to IEEE754 32-bit floating point values). Is there some way, possibly using ieee754.h, to do this?

I have one answer that seems to work, and I will post it below, but it seems pretty slow and inefficient and I would appreciate any suggestions about how to make it faster and/or more reliable.

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What about this: stackoverflow.com/a/2782742/1327576 ? –  smocking May 16 '12 at 14:37
    
I looked at that answer, and clearly it depends on the assumption that the host representation is little-endian. I'm looking for something that's host-byte-order-agnostic. –  Peter Brett May 16 '12 at 14:40
    
Arguably snprintf(b, sizeof(b), "%.9001f", yourvalue) (text-based representation) is most portable. –  jørgensen May 16 '12 at 16:33
1  
Arguably! Unfortunately, as mentioned in the question, I'm saving and loading very large quantities of data. I started off with textual representation, as you suggest, but it was too slow to printf and scanf the billions of data items, and the resulting files were too large. But you're quite right to point this option out. :-) –  Peter Brett May 16 '12 at 16:46
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Much simpler, and depending on the same assumption as yours (which is that float and integer types have the same byte order, and is almost universally valid -- realistically you'll never encounter a system where it isn't true):

#include <string.h>

float htonf(float val) {
    uint32_t rep;
    memcpy(&rep, &val, sizeof rep);
    rep = htonl(rep);
    memcpy(&val, &rep, sizeof rep);
    return val;
}

Any reasonably good compiler will optimize away the two memcpy calls; they are present to defeat over-eager strict aliasing optimizations, so this ends up being as efficient as htonl plus the overhead of a single function call.

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1  
Yes, ieee754.h assumes that -- or at least, all implementations that I've seen do (and as I said, it might as well be a universally valid assumption in our modern era). –  Stephen Canon May 16 '12 at 15:17
1  
Don't some ARM architectures have some weird mixed-endian craziness going on? Anyway, thanks again for your answer -- it's a lot easier to understand than mine, at the very least! –  Peter Brett May 16 '12 at 15:22
1  
@Agent_L That code triggers undefined behavior. You are dereferencing a pointer which points to a value which is not of the pointer's type. C compilers are allowed to render this arbitrarily not as you intended -- two things I have actually seen happen are that the compiler substitutes some constant value (usually zero) for the load, or it replaces the load with a trap instruction (i.e. insta-crash when called). –  Zack May 16 '12 at 15:31
1  
@Agent_L: There are platforms where the ABI requires stronger (or weaker) alignment for floats than for integers of the same size. On such a platform, the dereferencing a type-punned pointer will easily cause a crash. –  Stephen Canon May 16 '12 at 15:43
1  
@Agent_L: In addition, some compilers (such as gcc with -fstrict-aliasing) use strict aliasing assumptions to enable certain classes of optimisation, and will bitch like mad if you invoke undefined aliasing behaviour. For example, see this answer. –  Peter Brett May 16 '12 at 15:55
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Here's a portable IEEE 754 write routine. It will write a double in IEEE 754 format, regardless of the floating point representation on the host machine.

/*
* write a double to a stream in ieee754 format regardless of host
*  encoding.
*  x - number to write
*  fp - the stream
*  bigendian - set to write big bytes first, elee write litle bytes
*              first
*  Returns: 0 or EOF on error
*  Notes: different NaN types and negative zero not preserved.
*         if the number is too big to represent it will become infinity
*         if it is too small to represent it will become zero.
*/
static int fwriteieee754(double x, FILE *fp, int bigendian)
{
    int shift;
    unsigned long sign, exp, hibits, hilong, lowlong;
    double fnorm, significand;
    int expbits = 11;
    int significandbits = 52;

    /* zero (can't handle signed zero) */
    if (x == 0)
    {
        hilong = 0;
        lowlong = 0;
        goto writedata;
    }
    /* infinity */
    if (x > DBL_MAX)
    {
        hilong = 1024 + ((1 << (expbits - 1)) - 1);
        hilong <<= (31 - expbits);
        lowlong = 0;
        goto writedata;
    }
    /* -infinity */
    if (x < -DBL_MAX)
    {
        hilong = 1024 + ((1 << (expbits - 1)) - 1);
        hilong <<= (31 - expbits);
        hilong |= (1 << 31);
        lowlong = 0;
        goto writedata;
    }
    /* NaN - dodgy because many compilers optimise out this test, but
    *there is no portable isnan() */
    if (x != x)
    {
        hilong = 1024 + ((1 << (expbits - 1)) - 1);
        hilong <<= (31 - expbits);
        lowlong = 1234;
        goto writedata;
    }

    /* get the sign */
    if (x < 0) { sign = 1; fnorm = -x; }
    else { sign = 0; fnorm = x; }

    /* get the normalized form of f and track the exponent */
    shift = 0;
    while (fnorm >= 2.0) { fnorm /= 2.0; shift++; }
    while (fnorm < 1.0) { fnorm *= 2.0; shift--; }

    /* check for denormalized numbers */
    if (shift < -1022)
    {
        while (shift < -1022) { fnorm /= 2.0; shift++; }
        shift = -1023;
    }
    /* out of range. Set to infinity */
    else if (shift > 1023)
    {
        hilong = 1024 + ((1 << (expbits - 1)) - 1);
        hilong <<= (31 - expbits);
        hilong |= (sign << 31);
        lowlong = 0;
        goto writedata;
    }
    else
        fnorm = fnorm - 1.0; /* take the significant bit off mantissa */

    /* calculate the integer form of the significand */
    /* hold it in a  double for now */

    significand = fnorm * ((1LL << significandbits) + 0.5f);


    /* get the biased exponent */
    exp = shift + ((1 << (expbits - 1)) - 1); /* shift + bias */

    /* put the data into two longs (for convenience) */
    hibits = (long)(significand / 4294967296);
    hilong = (sign << 31) | (exp << (31 - expbits)) | hibits;
    x = significand - hibits * 4294967296;
    lowlong = (unsigned long)(significand - hibits * 4294967296);

writedata:
    /* write the bytes out to the stream */
    if (bigendian)
    {
        fputc((hilong >> 24) & 0xFF, fp);
        fputc((hilong >> 16) & 0xFF, fp);
        fputc((hilong >> 8) & 0xFF, fp);
        fputc(hilong & 0xFF, fp);

        fputc((lowlong >> 24) & 0xFF, fp);
        fputc((lowlong >> 16) & 0xFF, fp);
        fputc((lowlong >> 8) & 0xFF, fp);
        fputc(lowlong & 0xFF, fp);
    }
    else
    {
        fputc(lowlong & 0xFF, fp);
        fputc((lowlong >> 8) & 0xFF, fp);
        fputc((lowlong >> 16) & 0xFF, fp);
        fputc((lowlong >> 24) & 0xFF, fp);

        fputc(hilong & 0xFF, fp);
        fputc((hilong >> 8) & 0xFF, fp);
        fputc((hilong >> 16) & 0xFF, fp);
        fputc((hilong >> 24) & 0xFF, fp);
    }
    return ferror(fp);
}
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As mentioned in the question above, I have a solution to my problem, but I'm not particularly attached to it, and I welcome other answers, so I'm posting it here rather than in the question. In particular, it seems likely to be slow, and I'm not sure whether it breaks strict aliasing, among other potential problems.

#include <ieee754.h>

float
htonf (float val)
{
  union ieee754_float u;
  float v;
  uint8_t *un = (uint8_t *) &v;

  u.f = val;
  un[0] = (u.ieee.negative << 7) + ((u.ieee.exponent & 0xfe) >> 1);
  un[1] = ((u.ieee.exponent & 0x01) << 7) + ((u.ieee.mantissa & 0x7f0000) >> 16);
  un[2] = (u.ieee.mantissa & 0xff00) >> 8;
  un[3] = (u.ieee.mantissa & 0xff);
  return v;
}

float
ntohf (float val)
{
  union ieee754_float u;
  uint8_t *un = (uint8_t *) &val;

  u.ieee.negative = (un[0] & 0x80) >> 7;
  u.ieee.exponent = (un[0] & 0x7f) << 1;
  u.ieee.exponent += (un[1] & 0x80) >> 7;
  u.ieee.mantissa = (un[1] & 0x7f) << 16;
  u.ieee.mantissa += un[2] << 8;
  u.ieee.mantissa += un[3];

  return u.f;
}
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I don't think this is slow. –  undur_gongor May 16 '12 at 14:34
1  
Thanks for the vote of confidence. Did I mention that I am dealing with a lot of data? ;-) What makes it look fast to you? –  Peter Brett May 16 '12 at 14:38
    
It doesn't use expensive operations, no loops, no jumps. And I cannot imagine how you could get away with significantly less operations. But I'm at least as curious as you to see better proposals. –  undur_gongor May 16 '12 at 14:53
2  
My immediate reaction is that this is probably pretty fast as well. "fast" is a relative term, so I'll clarify what I mean by that. I think the CPU will be able to convert data a lot faster than the network can transmit it. Even ignoring the network, conversion speed will probably exceed bandwidth to main memory. –  Jerry Coffin May 16 '12 at 15:14
    
@JerryCoffin: Even if you can't make the network transfer faster, you can let the processor finish any given batch of work sooner, which lets it return to a low-power state and save energy. –  Stephen Canon May 16 '12 at 17:12
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