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*I'm very new to this, I might (probably will?) be talking some jibberish now and then, feel free to correct me ;)

I'm playing around with different primary key/index strategies and was wondering about the following. In many cases the choice for a GUID as the primary key is providing the record with unique identification across any database.

Now there are some performance issues with using GUIDs as primary key (and default behaviour of using it as the clustered index). There are a few alternatives one can think of, like using NEWSEQUENTIALID() or adding an extra IDENTITY column to provide a sequential clustered index.

Another one is doing away with GUIDs in the primary keys (and indexes) all together, while supplying a column for unique identification across the globe, an external identifier/rowid. This leaves you with smaller tables. Of course, there is the 16 byte penalty of the additional column, but this is quickly diminshed in tables with a few FKs. More stuff on the pages, nice sequential ids, smaller index space, so win win win.

This approach however leaves us with a nasty drawback: when you want to merge 2 tables, you get stuck with duplicate keys. Now, I'm not advocating this approach, I'm merely exploring and comparing different strategies in order to make me more versed in this part of database design.

The question is: How can we use the uniqueness of the GUID in this situation to deal with the duplicate key problem? Should one disable all table constraints and generate the IDENTITYs as the table gets merged? Should this approach be discarded entirely?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't think you need a GUID at all. While NEWSEQUENTIALID() is a better option than NEWID() in terms of page splits, it's still a wider key than necessary in most cases and you lose the only other benefit of GUIDs (that you can generate them in advance - which you can't do with NEWSEQUENTIALID()). Yet you still have a similar hotspot problem as IDENTITY values where all of the insert activity is happening on the same extent. So what has it gained you really?

Here are a couple of alternative approaches that I've implemented to avoid GUIDs in multi-instance systems that needed to maintain unique key values across systems.


Identity Ranges

If you are generating identity values in multiple servers and you later need to merge those, use identity ranges (with large enough margins for growth). On server one:

CREATE TABLE dbo.Data
(
  ID BIGINT IDENTITY(1000000000, 1) PRIMARY KEY
);

On server two:

CREATE TABLE dbo.Data
(
  ID BIGINT IDENTITY(2000000000, 1) PRIMARY KEY
);

You may be able to use INT depending on how many values you think you'll use - but better to plan ahead and leave lots of room than have to change it all later. Unless you're generating a lot of data you are not going to have to worry about collisions for centuries.

Key size: 8 bytes. (Or 4 bytes still, if you can use INT.)


Composite key

Another approach is to just have a ServerID column on the table, and make that part of a composite key. As long as you don't plan to expand beyond 255 servers, you can use TINYINT (1 byte). On server one:

CREATE TABLE dbo.Data
(
  ServerID TINYINT NOT NULL DEFAULT 1,
  DataID INT IDENTITY(1,1),
  PRIMARY KEY (ServerID, DataID)
);

On server two:

CREATE TABLE dbo.Data
(
  ServerID TINYINT NOT NULL DEFAULT 2,
  DataID INT IDENTITY(1,1),
  PRIMARY KEY (ServerID, DataID)
);

Now you just have to carry both columns around in your FKs on the merged system (or create an IDENTITY column in the merge) ... a little more painful for joins, but far lighter than carrying around GUIDs.

Key size: 5 bytes. (Or 6 bytes, if you need to step up to SMALLINT because 255 servers aren't enough.)

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Thank you for this helpful post, it's always nice to gain more insights from others :) – fuaaark May 21 '12 at 11:30

Out of curiosity what's the purpose of the merge?

Personally I would take the identity approach. If the clustered index is an identity value, then setting identity insert ON during the merge would work, assuming that the ID is simply to provide the row with a unique value and isn't required by any FKs (doesn't upset your data integrity). The new rows would just end up in the table with new IDs without any collision issues

It depends on your use case but I tend to stay away from GUIDs unless necessary

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Since there is talk of a few foreign key columns, I think that the original IDENTITY value can't just be discarded. – Aaron Bertrand May 16 '12 at 15:50
    
I made the assumption that the FKs were pointing to other columns, but good point :) – Charleh May 16 '12 at 15:57

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