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So this is might become overly complex to explain, but I'll try to keep it simple yet informative. my program, which is written in C#.net, monitors a microphone for 2 seconds and returns the Maximum value from a sample. I'm not super well versed with how sound and so forth is generated from winmm.dll, but my program is based loosely on NAudio and another project from CodeProject to visualize a wave. The wave format that I am using is this

    //WaveIn.cs
    private WaveFormat Format= new WaveFormat(8000, 16,1);
    //waveFormat.cs
[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)] 
public class WaveFormat
{
    public short wFormatTag;
    public short nChannels;
    public int nSamplesPerSec;
    public int nAvgBytesPerSec;
    public short nBlockAlign;
    public short wBitsPerSample;
    public short cbSize;

    public WaveFormat(int rate, int bits, short channels)
    {
        wFormatTag = (short)WaveFormats.Pcm;
        nChannels = channels;
        nSamplesPerSec = rate;
        wBitsPerSample = (short)bits;
        cbSize = 0;

        nBlockAlign = (short)(nChannels * (wBitsPerSample / 8));
        nAvgBytesPerSec = nSamplesPerSec * nBlockAlign;
    }

(I think i may have just found my problem, by posting this but i'm still going to ask)

so then i setup a event for max sound level in my wavein file. If i understand the source code correctly it fires when the buffer is full. here is that code

    private void CallBack(IntPtr waveInHandle, WaveMessage message, int userData, ref WaveHeader waveHeader, IntPtr reserved)
    {
        if (message == WaveMessage.WIM_DATA)
        {
            GCHandle hBuffer = (GCHandle)waveHeader.dwUser;
            WaveInBuffer buffer = (WaveInBuffer)hBuffer.Target;
            Exception exception = null;
            if (DataAvailable != null)
            {
                DataAvailable(buffer.Data, buffer.BytesRecorded);
            }
            if (MaxSoundLevel != null) //FOLLOW THIS ONE
            {
                byte[] waveStream = new byte[buffer.BytesRecorded];
                Marshal.Copy(buffer.Data, waveStream, 0, buffer.BytesRecorded);
                MaxSoundLevel(GetMaxSound(GetWaveChannels(waveStream)));
            }
            if (recording)
            {
                try
                {
                    buffer.Reuse();
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    recording = false;
                    exception = e;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    private short[] GetWaveChannels(byte[] waveStream)
    {
        short[] monoWave = new short[waveStream.Length/2];
        int h=0;
        for (int i = 0 ; i < waveStream.Length; i += 2)
        {
            monoWave[h] = BitConverter.ToInt16(waveStream, i);
            h++;
        }
        return monoWave;
    }

    private int GetMaxSound(short[] wave)
    {
        int maxSound = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < wave.Length; i++)
        {
            maxSound = Math.Max(maxSound, Math.Abs(wave[i]));
        }
        return maxSound;
    }

so when i monitor it from this test here it won't crash if i keep sound levels to "normal"

    [Test]
    public void TestSound()
    {
        var waveIn = new WaveIn();
        waveIn.MaxSoundLevel += new WaveIn.MaxSoundHandler(waveIn_MaxSoundLevel);
        waveIn.StartRecording();
        Console.WriteLine("Starting to record");
        Thread.Sleep(4800); //record for 4.8 seconds.
        waveIn.StopRecording();
        Console.WriteLine("Done Recording");

    }
    void waveIn_MaxSoundLevel(int MaxSound)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("MaxSound:{0}", MaxSound);
    }

here is my output

MaxSound:28 MaxSound:24 MaxSound:31 MaxSound:17 MaxSound:18760

Unhandled Exception: System.OverflowException: Negating the minimum value of a twos complement number is invalid.

I once got it to give me MaxSound:32767 (0x7FFF).

So i figured that my problem lied within it trying to convert a 32 bit number to a 16 bit number which is why i switched GetMaxSound from short to int. So I don't know. I am stumped. So why am I having this problem? doesn't my wave suggest it's max is 32,767 and that the winmm.dll would know that and not go past that? and since it is just converting 2 bytes of data to a short should it never encounter this problem? Please help :)

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From what do you gather that your "wave suggest it's max is 32,767", just because the system ran successfully for one wave does not mean it will for the next one, or are you saying that the system is behaving differently over multiple runs with the same file? Also you switched GetMaxSound but you left in BitConverter.ToInt16. –  Joshua Drake May 16 '12 at 15:01
1  
@JoshuaDrake This wave is from my microphone, not from a wave file. if i dont make loud noises in my microphone it won't crash. and my playing with GetMaxSound is from not understanding completly how it can crash with it's setup. If it is a bit converter shouldn't it never run into a overflow??? and shouldn't winmm just return 32767 or -32768...wait i use a abs on a short. which 32768 would result in overflow huh... BRB –  Robert Snyder May 16 '12 at 15:13
1  
that was it! i cast int to my wave[i] and now it just maxes out at 32768 :) maxSound = Math.Max(maxSound, Math.Abs((int)wave[i])); is the solution. I blew in it and it gave me the following output.MaxSound:399 MaxSound:320 MaxSound:264 MaxSound:32768 MaxSound:32768 MaxSound:32768 MaxSound:32768 MaxSound:32768 MaxSound:32768 MaxSound:32768 MaxSound:0 MaxSound:32768 MaxSound:32768 –  Robert Snyder May 16 '12 at 15:15
    
Another one you get to answer yourself. You'll be on your way to a Self-Learner Badge in no time. –  Joshua Drake May 16 '12 at 15:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

My solution, for those who may be looking into this, was fairly simple in nature. A 16bit signed number's maximum positive value is 32767. it's maximum negative number is -32768. If you take the absolute value of 32768 and try to put it into a 16 bit number it will result in a overflow exception being thrown. So the solution is to cast the short value to a 32 bit number before i try to take the absolute value of it. Here is the corrected function

    private int GetMaxSound(short[] wave)
    {
        int maxSound = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < wave.Length; i++)
        {
            maxSound = Math.Max(maxSound, Math.Abs((int)wave[i]));
        }
        return maxSound;
    }

I could probably just have stuck with an unsigned number as well by using ushort but the Math.Abs does

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