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OK, so I have the following procedure in my SQL Server 2005 Database. I am trying to figure out why it is giving me no results. The user attempting to access it is an administrator, but I have also tried accessing it with another user, and I still get no results. The Bond is returned in a basic query of the Bond table. I am just trying to figure out why this is returning no results. Any help is appreciated.

ALTER PROCEDURE dbo.GetBondAmounts
(
    @Username varchar(20)
)
AS
DECLARE @Admin AS bit
SELECT @Admin = Admin FROM Users WHERE Username = @Username
if(@Admin = 1)
BEGIN
    RETURN
    SELECT Bond.ID, SUM(Charge.BondAmount) + SUM(ChargeWithoutPower.BondAmount) Amount,
    SUM(Charge.BondPremium) + SUM(ChargeWithoutPower.BondPremium) + SUM(Forfeiture.AmountPaid)
    + SUM(Forfeiture.CostOfApprehension) - SUM(Payment.Amount) - SUM(BalanceForgiveness.AmountForgiven) Balance
    FROM Bond LEFT OUTER JOIN Payment ON Bond.ID = Payment.Bond
    LEFT OUTER JOIN BalanceForgiveness ON Bond.ID = BalanceForgiveness.BondID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Powers ON Bond.ID = Powers.Bond
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Charge ON Powers.Surety = Charge.PowerSurety
    AND Powers.PowerPrefix = Charge.PowerPrefix AND Powers.PowerNumber = Charge.PowerNumber
    LEFT OUTER JOIN ChargeWithoutPower ON Bond.ID = ChargeWithoutPower.ID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Forfeiture ON Bond.ID = Forfeiture.Bond
    LEFT OUTER JOIN BondFee ON Bond.ID = BondFee.Bond
    GROUP BY Bond.ID
END
ELSE
BEGIN
    RETURN
    SELECT Bond.ID, SUM(Charge.BondAmount) + SUM(ChargeWithoutPower.BondAmount) Amount,
    SUM(Charge.BondPremium) + SUM(ChargeWithoutPower.BondPremium) + SUM(Forfeiture.AmountPaid)
    + SUM(Forfeiture.CostOfApprehension) - SUM(Payment.Amount) - SUM(BalanceForgiveness.AmountForgiven) Balance
    FROM Bond LEFT OUTER JOIN UserAgency ON Bond.Agency = UserAgency.Agency
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Payment ON Bond.ID = Payment.Bond
    LEFT OUTER JOIN BalanceForgiveness ON Bond.ID = BalanceForgiveness.BondID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Powers ON Bond.ID = Powers.Bond
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Charge ON Powers.Surety = Charge.PowerSurety
    AND Powers.PowerPrefix = Charge.PowerPrefix AND Powers.PowerNumber = Charge.PowerNumber
    LEFT OUTER JOIN ChargeWithoutPower ON Bond.ID = ChargeWithoutPower.ID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Forfeiture ON Bond.ID = Forfeiture.Bond
    LEFT OUTER JOIN BondFee ON Bond.ID = BondFee.Bond
    WHERE UserAgency.Username = @Username
    GROUP BY Bond.ID
END

I am accessing this procedure using C# as follows:

bondingData.Merge(getBondAmountsAdapter.GetData(currentUser.Username));

This is the line I added to test and see if any results were returned:

MessageBox.Show("Bond Count A: " + bondingData.Bond.Count.ToString() + "\r\nBond Count B: " + bondingData.GetBondAmounts.Count.ToString());

When I ran it, here is the result I received:

Bond Count A: 1
Bond Count B: 0

[edit]

OK, so here is my solution to my issue:

ALTER PROCEDURE dbo.GetBondAmounts
(
    @Username varchar(20)
)
AS
    SELECT Bond.ID, dbo.GetBondTotal(Bond.ID) Total, dbo.GetBondBalance(Bond.ID) Balance
    FROM Bond LEFT OUTER JOIN
    UserAgency ON Bond.Agency = UserAgency.Agency
    WHERE UserAgency.Username = @Username
    OR EXISTS (SELECT * FROM Users WHERE Username = @Username AND Admin = 1)
    GROUP BY Bond.ID

These are the 2 Stored Functions that are called here. Not sure how efficient it is, but there will not be that many payments or anything related to the individual bonds. It just might get slow when the program has a lot of records.

Function 1:

ALTER FUNCTION dbo.GetBondTotal
(
@BondID bigint
)
RETURNS money
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @PowersTotal AS money;
    DECLARE @ChargesTotal AS money;
    DECLARE @BondFeeTotal AS money;
    DECLARE @ForfeitureCosts AS money;
    SELECT @PowersTotal = SUM(BondPremium)
    FROM Charge INNER JOIN Powers ON Charge.PowerSurety = Powers.Surety
    AND Charge.PowerPrefix = Powers.PowerPrefix
    AND Charge.PowerNumber = Powers.PowerNumber
    WHERE Bond = @BondID
    SELECT @ChargesTotal = SUM(BondPremium)
    FROM ChargeWithoutPower
    WHERE BondID = @BondID
    SELECT @BondFeeTotal = SUM(Amount)
    FROM BondFee WHERE Bond = @BondID
    SELECT @ForfeitureCosts = SUM(CostOfApprehension) + SUM(AmountPaid)
    FROM Forfeiture WHERE Bond = @BondID
    RETURN @PowersTotal + @ChargesTotal + @BondFeeTotal + @ForfeitureCosts
END

Function 2:

ALTER FUNCTION dbo.GetBondBalance
(
@BondID bigint
)
RETURNS MONEY
AS
    BEGIN
    DECLARE @PowersTotal AS money;
    DECLARE @ChargesTotal AS money;
    DECLARE @BondFeeTotal AS money;
    DECLARE @ForfeitureCosts AS money;
    DECLARE @PaymentTotal AS money;
    DECLARE @AmountForgiven AS money;
    SELECT @PowersTotal = SUM(BondPremium)
    FROM Charge INNER JOIN Powers ON Charge.PowerSurety = Powers.Surety
    AND Charge.PowerPrefix = Powers.PowerPrefix
    AND Charge.PowerNumber = Powers.PowerNumber
    WHERE Bond = @BondID
    SELECT @ChargesTotal = SUM(BondPremium)
    FROM ChargeWithoutPower
    WHERE BondID = @BondID
    SELECT @BondFeeTotal = SUM(Amount)
    FROM BondFee WHERE Bond = @BondID
    SELECT @ForfeitureCosts = SUM(CostOfApprehension) + SUM(AmountPaid)
    FROM Forfeiture WHERE Bond = @BondID
    SELECT @PaymentTotal = SUM(Amount)
    FROM Payment WHERE Bond = @BondID
    SELECT @AmountForgiven = SUM(AmountForgiven)
    FROM BalanceForgiveness WHERE BondID = @BondID
    RETURN @PowersTotal + @ChargesTotal + @BondFeeTotal + @ForfeitureCosts - @PaymentTotal - @AmountForgiven
END

I believe I will create a third function that will cover the amounts (Charge.Amount + ChargeWithoutPower.Amount)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I suspect you are thinking that the procedure needs to RETURN a result set. In fact, procedures can only "return" an integer. They can set output parameters and any result sets which are selected will be put in the output stream, but they aren't really anything to do with the RETURN statement.

Also note that your second query, the WHERE clause effectively turns the first LEFT JOIN into an INNER JOIN.

You could combine these two queries into a single query which might be simpler for maintenance, and you could eliminate the need for that separate bit variable and admin query. Note that the combined version can be easier for maintenance, BUT can have a suboptimal execution plan, since the two cases really might need very different execution plans. It could also be vulnerable to parameter sniffing, so you might want to use the "optimize for unknown" option and/or keep them split into two - it's a tradeoff. A lot of times when I see repetitive code which might be easier to maintain in one place, I have to weigh that. Sometimes the repetitive joins can be turned into a view or inline table-valued function.

I think it reduces to this:

ALTER PROCEDURE dbo.GetBondAmounts
(
    @Username varchar(20)
)
AS
BEGIN
    SELECT Bond.ID
           ,SUM(Charge.BondAmount)
             + SUM(ChargeWithoutPower.BondAmount) AS Amount
           ,SUM(Charge.BondPremium)
             + SUM(ChargeWithoutPower.BondPremium)
             + SUM(Forfeiture.AmountPaid)
             + SUM(Forfeiture.CostOfApprehension)
             - SUM(Payment.Amount)
             - SUM(BalanceForgiveness.AmountForgiven) AS Balance
    FROM Bond
    LEFT OUTER JOIN UserAgency ON Bond.Agency = UserAgency.Agency
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Payment ON Bond.ID = Payment.Bond
    LEFT OUTER JOIN BalanceForgiveness ON Bond.ID = BalanceForgiveness.BondID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Powers ON Bond.ID = Powers.Bond
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Charge ON Powers.Surety = Charge.PowerSurety
        AND Powers.PowerPrefix = Charge.PowerPrefix
        AND Powers.PowerNumber = Charge.PowerNumber
    LEFT OUTER JOIN ChargeWithoutPower ON Bond.ID = ChargeWithoutPower.ID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Forfeiture ON Bond.ID = Forfeiture.Bond
    LEFT OUTER JOIN BondFee ON Bond.ID = BondFee.Bond
    WHERE UserAgency.Username = @Username
        OR EXISTS (SELECT * FROM Users WHERE Username = @Username AND Admin = 1)
    GROUP BY Bond.ID
END

(Note that at this point of simplification, I would strongly consider using an inline table-valued function instead of a procedure, which is like a parameterized view and more flexible than a stored proc)

It worries me a bit the way you are grouping and joining.

If you have multiple payments and forfeitures (or any of those other tables linked by Bond.ID) attached to a bond, then you will get an inadvertent cross join, multiplying the values and then summing them, getting incorrect results.

I suspect you will need to do something like this to do your groupings - note that I have done the groupings in subqueries and re-aliased them by the same names:

ALTER PROCEDURE dbo.GetBondAmounts
(
    @Username varchar(20)
)
AS
BEGIN
    SELECT Bond.ID
           ,Charge.BondAmount
             + ChargeWithoutPower.BondAmount AS Amount
           ,Charge.BondPremium
             + ChargeWithoutPower.BondPremium
             + Forfeiture.AmountPaid
             + Forfeiture.CostOfApprehension
             - Payment.Amount
             - BalanceForgiveness.AmountForgiven AS Balance
    FROM Bond
    LEFT OUTER JOIN UserAgency ON Bond.Agency = UserAgency.Agency
    LEFT OUTER JOIN (
        SELECT Bond, SUM(Amount) AS Amount
        FROM Payment
        GROUP BY Bond
    ) AS Payment ON Bond.ID = Payment.Bond
    --- etc..
    WHERE UserAgency.Username = @Username
        OR EXISTS (SELECT * FROM Users WHERE Username = @Username AND Admin = 1)
END
share|improve this answer
    
Some bonds will have multiple payments, fees, powers, charges, etc. How would I get the total and balance on all bond records without getting any errors and doing it as quickly as possible (preferably in a single query)? Thanks, btw, for showing me how to combine the two statements into one. That helps quite a bit. –  Grungondola May 16 '12 at 16:08
    
Thank you, also, for paying close attention and catching another issue with my code. –  Grungondola May 16 '12 at 16:19
    
@stickybear13 see edit for one technique - you can also use scalar subqueries at the highest level –  Cade Roux May 16 '12 at 16:24
    
What about this option right here... I already had these stored functions, which I call from my C# code: code SELECT Bond.ID, dbo.GetBondTotal(Bond.ID) Total, dbo.GetBondBalance(Bond.ID) Balance FROM Bond LEFT OUTER JOIN UserAgency ON Bond.Agency = UserAgency.Agency WHERE UserAgency.Username = @Username OR EXISTS (SELECT * FROM Users WHERE Username = @Username AND Admin = 1) GROUP BY Bond.ID –  Grungondola May 16 '12 at 16:32
    
@stickybear13 I generally avoid scalar functions - they don't perform well at scale. They are fine, but not a first choice to solve a problem. Calling 8 on each row is slow when the rows increase. They make a black box boundary which the optimizer cannot work with - you generally want to use things which the optimizer can get into and rearrange - all the set-based things like tables, views, inline table-valued functions, etc. –  Cade Roux May 16 '12 at 17:22
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You've got a RETURN statement at the start of each section.

The query will return as soon as this statement is hit, so the SELECT will not execute and nothing will be returned.

To resolve this issue - remove the RETURN statements.

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