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I just inherited this code which is accessed by multiple threads. I just introduced two locks -- but I am wondering if there's anything else I should know. I have no significant experience working in multi-threaded applications.

namespace Helpers.Security
{
    public static class Encryption
    {
        #region "Random Numbers"
        static readonly int[] _randData = {
            //A gigantic list of numbers...
        };
        #endregion

        private static int _randIdx = 0;

        private static readonly object _encryptLock = new object();
        private static readonly object _decryptLock = new object();

        //HG 2009-JUN-11 - Added Reverse Methods from PF's Merge updates in [CDataServerBootStrapper]
        public static string EncryptStringReverse(string c_string)
        {
            return Encrypt(ReverseString(c_string));
        }
        public static string DecryptStringReverse(string c_string)
        {
            return Decrypt(ReverseString(c_string));
        }
        private static string ReverseString(string inputString)
        {
            string result = string.Empty;
            for (int pos = inputString.Length - 1; pos >= 0; pos--)
                result += inputString[pos];

            return result;
        }

        public static string Encrypt(string c_string)
        {
            if (c_string == null || c_string.Equals(string.Empty)) return string.Empty;
            int[] sasc = new int[224];
            char[] chash = new char[224];
            bool isExisting = false;
            string encstr = "";
            int sl = c_string.Length;

            lock (_encryptLock)
            {
                _randIdx = 0;

                for (int v = 0; v < 223; v++)
                {
                    sasc[v] = '\0';
                }
                for (int cl = 0; cl < sl; cl++)
                {
                    for (int a = 0; a < 223; a++)
                    {
                        int rnum = _randData[_randIdx++];
                        for (int y = 0; y < 223; y++)
                        {
                            if (sasc[y] == rnum)
                            {
                                isExisting = true;
                            }
                        }
                        if (isExisting == false)
                        {
                            sasc[a] = rnum;
                            chash[a] = (char) rnum;
                        }
                        else
                            a--;
                        isExisting = false;
                    }
                    chash[223] = '\0';
                    string strhash = new string(chash);
                    for (int v = 0; v < 223; v++)
                    {
                        sasc[v] = '\0';
                    }
                    encstr = encstr + strhash[c_string[cl] - 30];
                }
            }

            // Convert the wide-character string to multibyte string
            string sWholeHex = "";
            foreach (char c in encstr)
            {
                byte val = (byte) c;

                sWholeHex += val.ToString("X2");
            }

            return (sWholeHex.Trim().Replace("\0", ""));
        }

        public static string Decrypt(string c_string)
        {
            if (c_string == null || c_string.Equals(string.Empty)) return string.Empty;

            string szTemp = c_string;
            int nCtr = 0;
            byte[] byToDecrypt = new byte[1024];
            char[] chash = new char[223];
            char[] cencstr = new char[5000];
            int[] sasc = new int[223];
            bool isExisting = false;

            lock (_decryptLock)
            {
                for (int b = 0; b < 1024; b++)
                    byToDecrypt[b] = 0;

                int r;
                string sToDecrypt = string.Empty;
                for (r = 0; r < szTemp.Length - 1; r += 2)
                {
                    byte b2 = 0;
                    char c = szTemp[r];
                    if (c >= '0' && c <= '9')
                        b2 += (byte) (c - '0');
                    else if (c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z')
                        b2 += (byte) (c - 'A' + 10);

                    b2 *= 16;
                    c = szTemp[r + 1];
                    if (c >= '0' && c <= '9')
                        b2 += (byte) (c - '0');
                    else if (c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z')
                        b2 += (byte) (c - 'A' + 10);

                    byToDecrypt[nCtr++] = b2;
                    sToDecrypt += (char) b2;
                }

                _randIdx = 0;

                int sl = sToDecrypt.Length;

                for (int v = 0; v < 223; v++)
                {
                    sasc[v] = '\0';
                }
                int cl;
                for (cl = 0; cl < sl; cl++)
                {
                    for (int a = 0; a < 223; a++)
                    {
                        int rnum = _randData[_randIdx++];
                        for (int y = 0; y < 223; y++)
                        {
                            if (sasc[y] == rnum)
                            {
                                isExisting = true;
                            }
                        }
                        if (isExisting == false)
                        {
                            sasc[a] = rnum;
                            chash[a] = (char) rnum;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            a--;
                        }
                        isExisting = false;
                    }
                    string strhash = new string(chash);
                    int v;
                    for (v = 0; v < 223; v++)
                    {
                        if (sToDecrypt[cl] == strhash[v])
                            cencstr[cl] = (char) ((byte) (v + 30));
                    }

                    for (v = 0; v < 223; v++)
                    {
                        sasc[v] = 0;
                    }
                }
                cencstr[cl] = '\0';
            }

            string encstr = new string(cencstr);

            return (encstr.Trim().Replace("\0", ""));
        }
    }
}

My only thoughts were that there's a lot of work going on here so I should wrap all the work in a lock to make sure I don't just push the locking issue elsewhere. That being said -- only two variables are globally accessible... _randIdx and _randData. I am not sure if that plays a factor in deciding what to lock.

share|improve this question
    
A smaller example would be easier to read and provide feedback. –  Peter Ritchie May 16 '12 at 15:59
    
I did not simplify the example further to highlight my concern of 'pushing the locking issue elsewhere.' _randIdx and _randData are nested deeply inside of this code inside of for loops -- I am unsure if it is safe to lock that close to them. –  Sean Anderson May 16 '12 at 16:00
1  
Something I am wondering: _randIdx is set to 0 before it is used in both methods (Encrypt and Decrypt) - could it not be a local variable rather than a member variable therefore? In which case you'd not need any locks at all since you aren't changing the _randData array at all. –  kmp May 16 '12 at 16:10
    
Yup. The mysteries of legacy code. I did just that and everything seems to be working great still. –  Sean Anderson May 16 '12 at 16:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That depends on what kind of thread safety you need.

_randIdx can be both set and got by two different threads because your encrypt and decrypt method use different objects to lock around. You're only performing reads on the _randData array in each lock, so that's a non issue.

It seems like it would be trivially easy to make this non lock required by simply using a temporary index local to just that one method. Whether that is valid or not is up to you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the clear example. I will remove the locks, introduce a temporary local index and see if the issue re-introduces itself. –  Sean Anderson May 16 '12 at 16:04
    
Thread Safety is a kind of meaningless concept. When he means thread safety, he's asking "does my code produce some kind of expected output in a mutlithreaded scenario?", and until we know what the expected output is, or what the conditions are, it's hard to say if the stuff he asks for is thread safe or not. –  Tejs May 16 '12 at 16:39
    
I'd recommend you read What is this thing call thread safety? - it certainly is illuminating. –  Tejs May 16 '12 at 17:13
    
The "kind of safety" basically means his requirements for output, which he didn't specify. Perhaps the OP wanted the _randIdx to be more indeterminate in a thread safe manner for better randomization. So I'm not sure what your issue is with the comment. –  Tejs May 16 '12 at 17:24
    
You state that an answer can't be given without clarifying the kind of thread safety that is needed. Then you state an answer. The contradiction is very clear. –  David B May 16 '12 at 17:26

You will need to use the same lock to protect the _randIdx global variable in both the encryption and the decryption. _randData is not modified, so no need to protect it specifically. As all methods of the class are static, you don't have any other members to protect from simulateous access/modification

share|improve this answer

You should minimize the amount of 'work' performed while in a lock block. I would recommend refactoring the work within the lock to another object maybe passing (via [Array.Copy(...)][1]) _randData.

Are you actually modifying _randData? If not, I see no reason to lock. You are also using 2 different locks - one for encrypt and one for decrypt. Is it intentional that you would be able to access _randData from 2 threads? Having 2 lock objects will allow this to happen.

share|improve this answer

Attila is right on, but I'm going to use a few more words to describe those ideas:

You have two lock targets (_encryptLock and _decryptLock). You can enter those locks at the same time on different threads. This means that the Encrypt method can set _randidx to 0 while Decrypt method was using it (bad). Use only one lock target per set of protected instances.

You don't actually need a lock to protect _randData, since you aren't modifying it. Multiple threads can safely read from the same array. The instances in _randData don't need protection either, as they are value types - whoever accesses the array gets a copy and doesn't modify the original.

You wouldn't need a lock to protect _randidx if you changed it to two method scoped variables. That which belongs only to one thread, is safe.

Since you have no instances that need to be protected by a lock, you may have no lock.

share|improve this answer

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