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A thread in java can't be restarted in Java, so I implemented a java Thread , and then tried to restart the thread after getting the serialized object of Thread.

import java.io.Serializable;

public class ThreadSerialization extends Thread implements Serializable {

    int iCheck = 10;
    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("STARTING");
        for(int i=0;i<10;i++){
            iCheck+=i;
        }
    }

}

and Serializing algo-

public class CallingThreadSerializable {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ThreadSerialization ser = new ThreadSerialization();
        ser.start();
        FileOutputStream fos = null;
        ObjectOutputStream out = null;
        FileInputStream fis = null;
        ObjectInputStream ois = null;
        try {
            fos = new FileOutputStream("thread.ser");
            out = new ObjectOutputStream(fos);
            out.writeObject(ser);
        } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            try {
                out.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }

        try {
            fis = new FileInputStream("thread.ser");
            ois = new ObjectInputStream(fis);
            ThreadSerialization ser1 = (ThreadSerialization) ois.readObject();
            System.out.println("---> " + ser1.iCheck);
            ser1.start();
            System.out.println("---> " + ser1.iCheck);
            ois.close();
        } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }

}

OUTPUT-

STARTING
---> 55
---> 55
STARTING

Why the ser1 object is starting again ?

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4  
It's not the same Object anymore. –  Jivings May 16 '12 at 16:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you deserialize(?) an Object then you are essentially creating a new instance of that class with the same properties as the original Object.

It is not the same Object.

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1  
It's not the same object, but the internal state of the "clone" should be the same. This internal state should prevent a second call to start. –  A.H. May 17 '12 at 7:41
    
@A.H. Interesting, I gave you +1 –  Jivings May 17 '12 at 9:56

There are two points:

First: Thread is NOT Serializable and hence the following excerpt from the serializable JavaDoc applies:

To allow subtypes of non-serializable classes to be serialized, the subtype may assume responsibility for saving and restoring the state of the supertype's public, protected, and (if accessible) package fields.

Which mean, your class ThreadSerialization would have the responsibility to store and restore the state of Thread. But you cannot do that due to many private fields in Thread. Therefore all private field in Thread are default initialized. Now look at implementation of Thread.start() :

    //...
    if (threadStatus != 0)
        throw new IllegalThreadStateException();
    // ...
    start0();
    //...

Because threadStatus has not been stored/restored properly you can start a second time.

Second: Don't confuse the actual operating system thread and the "manager" object java.lang.Thread - they are only loosely coupled. In your example you only serialize the manager but not the OS-thread which has no representation in Java. After deserialization you have a second manager instance which no attached OS-thread. So telling the manager to start will succeed.

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During serialization the Objects instance variables are sucked out, and converted to bytes and written on a file (typically a file with .ser extension) then, during deserialization the bytes are read from the file, and then converted to instance variables, and are used to create new object identical to the one which was serialized. Their constructor are never called, so it reaches the state when it was serialized not when it was created.

You can check the hashcode of the object before serialization, and then after deserialization, they will never be same, as hashcode is provided by JVM depending on where the object is create on the heap, and its obvious the 2 objects cant be created on the heap at the same address...so they are diff objects but with identical state.

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To make an object serializable, the respective class should explicitly implement Serializable interface. However certain system classes defined by java like "Thread", "OutputStream", "Socket" are not serializable. Why so? Lets take a step back - now what is the use of serializing the Thread running in System1 JVM using System1 memory and then deserializing it in System2 and trying to run in System2 JVM. Makes sense right! Hence these classes are not serializable.

Coming to your program.

ThreadSerialization ser1 = (ThreadSerialization) ois.readObject();// Thread started in System2.
ser1.start();// Thread once again started here in System2.

It is very bad to have a class which implements serializable and extends Thread or implemeting Runnable. In Summary Don't use thread in sealization or stream and socket process.

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