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I am trying to write some code that allows SVG elements to be dragged around. This is pretty easy with jQuery, jQuery UI and jQuery SVG, and works fine in Firefox, but in Chrome when I drag the SVG element, an offset is apparently added to its coordinates. I can't see anything I'm doing wrong, or discover any known bug in this area.

I've constructed a small example that illustrates the problem:

<html>
  <head>
    <title>Foo</title>
    <style type="text/css">
    </style>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jqueryui/1.8.18/jquery-ui.min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://keith-wood.name/js/jquery.svg.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
$(function() {
    var svgOnLoad = function () {
        var svg = $('#canvas').svg('get');
        $('#piece')
            .draggable()
            .bind('drag', function (event, ui) {
                // Update transform manually, since top/left style props don't work on SVG
                var t = event.target.transform.baseVal;
                if (t.numberOfItems == 0) {
                    t.appendItem(svg.root().createSVGTransform());
                }
                t.getItem(0).setTranslate(ui.position.left, ui.position.top);
            });
    }
    $('#canvas').svg({loadURL: "foo.svg", onLoad: svgOnLoad});
});
    </script>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div id="canvas" style="width: 100%; height: 100%;"></div>
  </body>
</html>

where foo.svg is just:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?>
<svg version="1.1"
    xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg"
    width="450" height="450">
    <rect id="piece" width="50" height="50" x="100" y="100" />
</svg>

An online version can be found at:

http://jsfiddle.net/rrthomas/v477X/2/

share|improve this question
    
A live example, +1. This is fine as-is, but you may find it useful to use jsfiddle in the future for examples - people can fork your code and try/suggest a fix more easily. –  halfer May 16 '12 at 17:34
    
Thanks for the tip, I've changed the online version to a jsFiddle. –  Reuben Thomas May 16 '12 at 21:51

4 Answers 4

The problem is that you are not starting at position 0, 0 of the svg canvas. You can achieve the desired result by subtracting the x and y attributes from the object. When you calculate your manual drag you are re-positioning the entire svg element, not just the rectangle.

see here: http://jsfiddle.net/v477X/6/

NOTE: The different browsers seem to be returning different objects for the element you are trying to translate. This solution works in Webkit browsers. At this point, it seems you have 2 options. Modify your selector to choose the same element, (specifically the line t.getItem(0)), or determine which browser the user is current viewing on, and add the offset if it is webkit. Personally, I would go with the latter, as that way you can just set a variable and check it.

see here for how to detect browser engine: How to detect if a browser is Chrome using jQuery?

share|improve this answer
    
Did this help at all? –  Jlange May 18 '12 at 16:46
    
I'm sorry, I was expecting to be notified of answers and for some reason wasn't, so I've only just seen this. Thanks for the code (though the check should be for WebKit browsers, not just Chrome; at least Epiphany also fails).Unfortunately, I don't really understand what's going on here. –  Reuben Thomas May 18 '12 at 19:36
    
I'm not "re-positioning the entire svg element", I'm only setting a transform on the event target, i.e. the rect element. t.getItem(0) refers to a transform which I created myself (the t.appendItem if clause fires in both Firefox and Chrome), and is the transform on the rect. I've changed the code to refer to this rather than event.target to clarify: jsfiddle.net/rrthomas/v477X/7 So why has the returned offset a different base in Firefox and WebKit? –  Reuben Thomas May 18 '12 at 20:02
up vote 0 down vote accepted

There seems to be a bug in jQueryUI here: in non-Webkit browsers, the ui.position object uses absolute coordinates, whereas in other browsers it's an offset from ui.originalPosition. I don't know which is correct; the bug is that the behavior is inconsistent. I've filed a bug report at:

http://bugs.jqueryui.com/ticket/8335

The workaround is therefore to store the original coordinates of the top-level element, and set the coordinate to (ui.position - ui.originalPosition + origCoords) when setting the translate transform in Webkit browsers. (Jlange's answer uses the x and y attributes of the rect used in my minimal example, which works fine there, but does not work with more complex objects which a) may not have x and y attributes (e.g. if the top-level element is a g element) and b) where the coordinates returned seem not to be those of the top-level element anyway (I'm afraid I don't know why).) Minimal code follows:

var svgOnLoad = function () {
var svg = $('#canvas').svg('get');
    $('#piece')
        .draggable()
            .on({
                dragstart: function (event, ui) {
                    var tlist = this.transform.baseVal;
                        if (tlist.numberOfItems == 0) {
                            tlist.appendItem(svg.root().createSVGTransform());
                        }
                        var tm = tlist.getItem(0).matrix;
                        var pos = {left: tm.e, top: tm.f};
                        $.data(this, 'originalPosition', pos);
                    },
                    drag: function (event, ui) {
                        // Update transform manually, since top/left style props don't work on SVG
                        var tlist = this.transform.baseVal;
                        var CTM = this.getCTM();
                        var p = svg.root().createSVGPoint();
                        p.x = ui.position.left + CTM.e;
                        p.y = ui.position.top + CTM.f;
                        if ($.browser.webkit) { // Webkit gets SVG-relative coords, not offset from element
                            var origPos = $.data(this, 'originalPosition');
                            p.x -= ui.originalPosition.left - origPos.left;
                            p.y -= ui.originalPosition.top - origPos.top;
                        }
                        p = p.matrixTransform(CTM.inverse());
                        tlist.getItem(0).setTranslate(p.x, p.y);
                    }});
};
$('#canvas').svg({onLoad: svgOnLoad});

​​ Live version at: http://jsfiddle.net/rrthomas/v477X/

share|improve this answer
    
This answer is incorrect: ui.originalPosition means what it says, so the correction only works when dragging from the original position. I'm working to find a proper fix; when I've found it I'll replace this answer. –  Reuben Thomas May 19 '12 at 21:19
    
I don't really think this is a bug in jQueryUI. The different engines have small differences in positioning methodology. The solution to your problem would be to find where your elements are relative to the SVG canvas and offset them in Webkit browsers. For a group element this is as simple as iterating through its children for the top left element and determining if this is a top level object to begin with. Remember that events bubble up, so even though the drag selector is triggered, the original target event may have been on a child. –  Jlange May 21 '12 at 18:10
    
I've now updated the solution as promised. There is a bug: jQueryUI is supposed to give the same results in different browsers, and here they're systematically different. Presumably one of the browsers is breaking the SVG spec, but jQueryUI's supposed to paper over such differences. –  Reuben Thomas May 21 '12 at 22:32
    
Updated to cope with SVG with a non-identity CTM at the top level. –  Reuben Thomas Jun 12 '12 at 22:44

I recently spent a couple days hammering at this problem, and I came up with a solution that worked fairly well for me. It's definitely a hack, and won't work in all situations.

This link has an excellent description of how to solve the problem in general, and that is definitely the "better" solution. However, I wanted to keep using JQuery's excellent Draggable API.

You can see a quick mock-up of what I did in a fiddle here. The key idea is to use a proxy div which you keep hovering exactly over the svg element you want to drag. Then you change the svg element's x and y coordinates as you drag the proxy div. Something like this:

$('#proxy').on('drag', function(e)
    {
        t = $('#background');
        prox = $('#proxy');
        t.attr('x', t.attr('x')*1
                   + prox.css('left').slice(0,-2)*1
                   - prox.data('position').left)
            .attr('y', t.attr('y')*1
                      + prox.css('top').slice(0,-2)*1
                      - prox.data('position').top);
        prox.data('position',{top : prox.css('top').slice(0,-2)*1,
                              left: prox.css('left').slice(0,-2)*1}
                  );
    });

In my case the SVG element I wanted to drag would always fill a certain square on the screen, so it was very easy to position the proxy div over the target. In other situations it could be much more difficult. It's also not too hard to use the 'containment' option to make sure you don't drag the background outside the frame...it just takes some careful math and you have to reset the containment in between each drag.

share|improve this answer

use this:

<html>
<head>
    <title>Foo</title>
    <style type="text/css">
    </style>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/ui/1.8.18/jquery-ui.min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://keith-wood.name/js/jquery.svg.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        $(function ()
            {
            var svg = $('#canvas').svg().svg('get');
            $('#piece')
                    .draggable()
                    .on({
                        dragstart: function (event, ui)
                            {
                            var t = this.transform.baseVal;
                            if (t.numberOfItems == 0)
                                { t.appendItem(svg.root().createSVGTransform()); }
                            var tm = t.getItem(0).matrix;
                            var dx = tm.e - ui.position.left;
                            var dy = tm.f - ui.position.top;
                            $.data(this, 'dragTo', function dragTo(newPos)
                                {
                                tm.e = newPos.left + dx;
                                tm.f = newPos.top + dy;
                                });
                            },
                        drag: function (event, ui)
                            { $.data(this, 'dragTo')(ui.position); }});
            });
    </script>
</head>
<body>
<div id="canvas" style="width: 100%; height: 100%;">
    <svg version="1.1"
         xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg"
         width="450" height="450">
        <rect id="piece" width="50" height="50" x="0" y="0" style="position:absolute"/>
    </svg>
</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

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