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I have a code block like this:

if(supportsSomeStuff()){
     .....
     .....
}
else {
     .....
     .....
}

Now I want to have this block of code in a multiple read, single write lock. In this case, is it better to lock in the if statement, and release the lock after if, then lock in the else statement and release it when done?

Or, can I just have one lock for this if-else case and release it when I am done?

If I need to decide on this , what all factors do I need to take into consideration?

Please let me know if you need more information.

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1  
Does the if condition also have to be evaluated atomically? –  Tudor May 16 '12 at 17:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Are you considering the following two variants?

synchronized(lock) {
    if(supportsSomeStuff()){
         .....
    }
    else{
         .....
    }
}

vs.

if(supportsSomeStuff()){
    synchronized(lock) {
     .....
    }
}
else{
    synchronized(lock) {
     .....
    }
}

The only (huge) difference between them is that the condition inside if statement is not synchronized in the latter case. Besides (if supportsSomeStuff() can be executed in several threads) they are equivalent, although the former case holds the lock for slightly longer time.

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In case in this method you are changing state then have lock on that

Say you are changing StringBuilder then have a lock on your StringBuilder named changingvalue and supportsSomeStuff is stateless

if(supportsSomeStuff()){
     //Considering that if will be executed when write needs to be done and else when read to be done 
     copyOnWriteStringBuilder = new StringBuilder(changingvalue.toString());//This will ensure that before every write you have taken a backup so concurrent read will see the last updated values
     synchronized(changingvalue) {
        //doSomething and then place the updated value in copyOnWriteStringBuilder too
     }
  }
else{
    return copyOnWriteStringBuilder; // This piece for read no locking
}
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I would say:

  • Only lock and unlock once either through the if or else section of course.
  • Use a lock(); try { ... } finally { unlock(); } model to help with your decision. If the code is cleaner to just wrap the entire if in that model then go with that.

I would think that something like the following is the most clean unless I'm missing something.

lock.lock();
try {
   if(supportsSomeStuff()){
      ...
   } else {
      ...
   }
} finally {
   lock.unlock();
}

If you are worried that the if test is locked and doesn't need to be then don't be. The only time you should worry about that is if the test itself calls other methods that may be a performance hit that you don't need and don't want to be locked.

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You don't really give enough information to give much more than a general answer.

But in general, you should try and find the optimum compromise between the following:

  • hold on to locks for as little time as possible;
  • but, hold the lock around the entire code of operations which need to be atomic.

Where exactly the best compromise between these competing factors lies depends on your situation.

Incidentally, many people are suggesting the built in 'synchronized' lock, but since you mention you only need one write thread, then depending on your situation you may get better throughput with a ReentrantReadWriteLock.

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Read is not exclusive but write is; which means there can be multiple simultaneous reads but write can be only one and when write happens no reads are allowed.

It depends on what you do where. Limit the block where you do write to minimum.

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