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I'm trying to determine the suitability of JavaFX2 for a project. I've heard many wonderful thing, but struggling to seperate the fact from the fiction and hoping the hive mind can shine a light.

The project is a java daemon running on a server (Linux, Windows) on a constant basis with a user interface available for access to config and view generated data. What I would like to do is the user to connect to the server and have a JavaFX program be downloaded and run, being able to connect to the server via REST calls (for example).

Is it possible to have this pure java server run, and just package the JavaFX application for download? Does the server environment impact whether the JavaFX will run? Will I have to run some form of webserver (Jetty?) to make this happen?

I appreciate the question is vague - I'm finding some of the terminology tricky so I'll edit and refine on demand. Thanks for your time

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Is it possible to have this pure java server run, and just package the JavaFX application for download?

Yes. See the JavaFX deployment quick start and the deployment guide for packaging options and instructions.

Does the server environment impact whether the JavaFX will run?

No, JavaFX runs only on a client not on a server.

Will I have to run some form of webserver (Jetty?) to make this happen?

Probably. You will need to have some way of getting your JavaFX application to clients.

You could just email your JavaFX app to your clients or place them on your clients via a network file copy, but hosting the apps on a webserver is probably the best approach. Any http server will work for this purpose (e.g. apache httpd, tomcat, jetty operating as either a standalone server or a server embedded in your app).

You will need to have some way for the JavaFX application to communicate with the server. If this communication is happening using REST calls, then you are likely using http as the underlying client/server communication protocol, in which case you need to run a webserver anyway to handle the incoming REST calls from your client.

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What I would like to do is the user to connect to the server and have a JavaFX program be downloaded and run, being able to connect to the server via REST calls (for example).

You should google on keywords JavaFX, REST and enterprise. There are a couple of examples using the RESTful web service approach. JavaFX can be launched through Java Web Start. But if you plan to use Java Web Start, I see no reason for you to consume a http wired RESTful web service. It doesn't look like there is a standardized way to package a JavaFX web start application in a EAR package and have him use dependency injection for server side resources. But it is possible if you package a regular Java SE application and let that application start a JavaFX application and forward the proxy objects to your back end resources. Here is a tutorial I wrote with a solution using only NetBeans wizard and some minor code customization:

http://blog.martinandersson.com/the-enterprise-side-of-javafx-the-missing-part/

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