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I have two divs next to the each other which background color is white. http://jsfiddle.net/J5ZXt/ is link to code. I want that two divs look like one element, so I need to remove a part of shadow. Any ideas?

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1  
I don't believe so, no –  jacktheripper May 16 '12 at 19:08
2  
You can wrap them in a parent div and put the shadow on it. –  Brendan May 16 '12 at 19:09
2  
Masking tape :) jsfiddle.net/J5ZXt/1 –  Heitor Chang May 16 '12 at 19:09
1  
@HeitorChang hahaha that is magic masking tape :) –  mattytommo May 16 '12 at 19:11
    
@Vukasin, I've posted another answer that doesn't have a gap or rely on a static height for #one. –  bfrohs May 16 '12 at 19:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is the best I could get within a couple of minutes, I think it does the job. The best thing is its simplicity (only 3 edits to your css)

Position D1's shadow so the right edge has a negative value (-4px is enough to hide it)

Give both divs relative positioning so we can control their stacking order.

Give D1 a higher z-index than D2 so it masks the top part of D2's shadow.

#one {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background: #FFF;
    -moz-box-shadow: -4px 0 3px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
    -webkit-box-shadow: -4px 0 3px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
    box-shadow: -4px 0px 3px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
    float:left;
    position: relative;
    z-index: 20;
}
#two {
    width: 100px;
    height: 300px;
    background: #FFF;
    -moz-box-shadow: 0 0 3px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
    -webkit-box-shadow: 0 0 3px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
    box-shadow: 0 0 3px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
    float:left;
    z-index: 5;
    position: relative;
}
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2  
This answer is the best for non-pixel heights for div #one! Thanks a lot. –  Vukašin Manojlović May 16 '12 at 19:30
1  
There are two issues with this answer. The first, and pretty trivial (and easily fixable), issue is the box-shadows specified are different from eachother. Secondly, there is a gap between the shadows (in the corner, between them), and a larger shadow on the left side of #one. –  bfrohs May 16 '12 at 19:31
    
Sorry, I was in a rush to go out and forgot to edit the vendor-specific CSS. Have now edited my post. However, it still doesn't rely on trying to put something 'over the top' - a last resort in my opinion and only to be used when absolutely necessary: stackoverflow.com/questions/4015263/…. Also, by adjusting the shadows I'm certain it can be made to render perfectly. As I say, I was in a rush to leave the house so just posted a proof of concept to get started with ;) –  Nealio May 16 '12 at 22:10

Because I hate to be outdone and tend to be a perfectionist, I came up with an answer that doesn't rely on a specific height for #one--it just has to be shorter than #two (which is also the case for the currently accepted answer). It also does not have the downside of a gap or larger shadow on one side of #one.

Note: This answer also gives the possibility for a curved corner via border-radius. Simply add border-radius:4px; to #one:after to see the result.

jsFiddle Example

New CSS

<style type="text/css">
#one {
    width: 100px;
    height: 200px;
    background: #fff;
    float:left;
    position:relative;
    overflow:hidden;
}
#one:after {
    display:block;
    content:".";
    font-size:0;
    color:transparent;
    height:8px;
    width:100%;
    padding-left:4px;
    position:absolute;
    bottom:-4px;
    left:-4px;
    background:#fff;
    z-index:2;
    -moz-box-shadow: inset 0 0 3px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
    -webkit-box-shadow: inset 0 0 3px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
    box-shadow: inset 0 0 3px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
}
#two {
    width: 100px;
    height: 300px;
    background: #FFF;
    -moz-box-shadow: 0 0 3px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
    -webkit-box-shadow: 0 0 3px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
    box-shadow: 0 0 3px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
    float:left;
}
</style>
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Pure CSS - no

You could always try absolutely position a div above it, as in this example

The ::before solution does not work in all browsers

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+1 beat me to it! As @HeitorChang calls it, Masking tape :) –  mattytommo May 16 '12 at 19:14
1  
@jacktheripper, :before and :after have better browser support than box-shadow (i.e. browsers that support box-shadow most likely support :before and :after, but not vice-versa). –  bfrohs May 16 '12 at 19:52
    
Excellent point - I take that back –  jacktheripper May 16 '12 at 20:13

Yes, it is possible. Simply cover it up with :before. See the jsFiddle Example.

Additional CSS

<style type="text/css">
#two {
    position:relative; /* Add relative positioning */
}
/* Add :before element to cover up shadow */
#two:before {
    background:white;
    display:block;
    content:".";
    font-size:0;
    width:4px; /* Width of Shadow */
    height:100px; /* Height of #one */
    position:absolute;
    left:-4px; /* 0 - Width of Shadow */
    top:0;
}
</style>
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Thanks! It works. –  Vukašin Manojlović May 16 '12 at 19:17

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