Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

http://jsfiddle.net/gfuKS/5/

var transitionInitial = {property: "none"};
var rules = ["color", "background-color"];
var transitions = [];
for ( var k = 0; k < rules.length; k++)
{
    transitions[k] = transitionInitial;
    transitions[k].property = rules[k];
    alert(transitions[0].property);
}​

Why at the second iteration transitions[0].property equals "background-color"?

share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Because you are storing a reference to transitionInitial, not a copy of it. transitionInitial points to an object in memory, and you are storing a reference to this object in transitions[k]. Regardless of the iteration you are at, you are always changing the same object.

share|improve this answer

It's because both values in your transitions array are pointing at the same object. During the execution of your code you produce one object that has three different references (transitionInitial, transistions[0], & transistions[1]).

During the first iteration of the loop, transistions[0] is set to reference the transitionInitial object. Then the property property of that object is set to the value "color". During the second iteration transitions[1] is set to reference the same object as transitionInitial and transitions[0]. You then reset the property's value to "background-color".

To solve this create different objects for each of your array indexes:

// Not needed anymore:
// var transitionInitial = {property: "none"};
var rules = ["color", "background-color"];
var transitions = [];
for ( var k = 0; k < rules.length; k++) {
  transitions[k] = {};
  transitions[k].property = rules[k];
  alert(transitions[0].property);
}​
share|improve this answer

Does it have anything with this to do maybe? for ( var k = 0; k < rules.length; k++) Try changing the timer.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.