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The following is C#, though the code pattern is probably relevant to any OO language.

I have two methods, MethodWithTry and MethodWithSomeReturnValue that I believe are functionally equivalent. I would like to know if one of them is the "correct" way. Is there something about one (ex. concurrency) that makes one of them a bad choice.

    public void MethodWithTry()
    {
        int returnValue;
        string someInput;

        if (TryGetValueThisWay(someInput, returnValue))
        {
            //do something this way
        }
        else
        {
            if (TryGetValueThatWay(someInput, returnValue))
            {
                //do something that way
            }
            else
            {
                //do something a default way
            }
        }
    }

    public void MethodWithSomeReturnValue()
    {
        int? returnValue;
        string someInput;

        returnValue = GetValueThisWay(someInput);
        if (returnValue != null)
        {
            //do something this way
        }
        else
        {
            returnValue = GetValueThatWay(someInput);
            if (returnValue != null)
            {
                //do something that way
            }
            else
            {
                //do something a default way
            }
        }
    }

The signatures for the methods being called are

    public int? GetValueThisWay(string input)
    public int? GetValueThatWay(string input)
    private bool TryGetValueThisWay(string input, out int value)
    private bool TryGetValueThatWay(string input, out int value)

EDIT -- ADDITIONAL INFO

The methods in question being called are doing finds in collections. So different names might have been

public int? GetValueFromCollectionA()
public int? GetValueFromCollectionB()

IMHO, TrySomeMethodName - makes the code somewhat more readable. However, using an OUT variable, especially when the return value is an integer, means that it is always mutable and assigned to at least twice (set to 0 as default).

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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you operate on value types (like int) and the result of your method can be null, you should go for the Try version. This is because value types do not mix too well with null. For example int? is way slower than int because of boxing introduced by ?. All .NET TryParse methods work with value types and they follow this pattern. I think it's good to conform to this approach.

When you start to operate on reference types it becomes more natural to use method result and return null when needed.

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OK, That's the connection that I hadn't made. It's a value type thing to prevent boxing. Makes sense. Thanks. –  John May 23 '12 at 14:15
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Depending on the return type writing this method today - assuming that the operation may fail, and that is part of the overall workflow - I would return a nullable struct, or a null reference value instead of the Tryxxx approach - having to use out values is rather cumbersome in my opinion.

 public int? MethodWithSomeReturnValue()
 {
    //return null in failure case
 }

 int? result = MethodWithSomeReturnValue();
 if(result != null)
 {
   //...
 }
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Well, thats depends. And probably this will be the answer you will get from everybody with will to answer you. Sometimes you know or you can assume that an value is always from some type and you can use GetValue or ConvertToInt32 (e.g.), e.g. getting values from database with defined types. But others times you cannot trust the input and you are not sure which type it is, like user input... in this case you may perfer to use the TryGetValue or TryParse (e.g.). So in the end it's up to you.

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So what you're saying is that TryGetValue() is mostly when the algorithm in the called method has a decent chance of throwing an exception? And that's when you'd most want to use it? –  John May 16 '12 at 19:56
    
Yes, that is my opinion to your question. Others will have a different opinion, it's not an exact science. The most important is that the code should be easy to read and consistent. –  Bruno Costa May 16 '12 at 20:01
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