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Update: according to the link in my question below, 'M' seems to mean Merge'd when you see it during a branch change, but Modified with git status: "When we switch to the master branch, the working directory is considered “dirty” since the README file has not been added to the index and committed. As a result, git will attempt to merge the contents of README from the test branch into the README file in the master branch:"

Forgive my git ignorance, but why is it when I make changes in an upstream branch, and then checkout my master branch (without commit'ing), the modified file follows the current branch as a Merge? I thought git only merged when I told it to merge. I don't always want my edits to propogate to another branch so is there a way to tell git to ask before merging?

iow: How can I tell git to keep me from screwing up another branch if I acccidentally switch to it with un-commit'd edits in my current branch?

[on branch:foo]
$ echo test >> main.c

[on branch:foo]
$ cat main.c 
#include <stdio.h>

int main void (int argc, char **argv)
{
   printf ("Hello world!\n");
   return (0);
}
test

[on branch:foo]
$ git checkout master
M       main.c
Switched to branch 'master'

[on branch:master]
$ cat main.c 
#include <stdio.h>

int main void (int argc, char **argv)
{
   printf ("Hello world!\n");
   return (0);
}
test

[on branch:master]
$   
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2  
M means modified, not merged. Type git status to see more info –  Abe Voelker May 16 '12 at 20:15
2  
Git is not merging. Changes don't belong to a particular branch, they float atop of the working tree. –  knittl May 16 '12 at 20:21
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It depends on what you want to do with the changes.

If you wanna throw them away use git checkout -f master

If you wanna save them for later, git stash the changes to clean the working tree and git pop to apply the changes again whenever and wherever you want.

If you want the changes to stay in the branch, just git commit the changes before git checkout master.

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Thanks! I didn't know about the -f param. that will surely come in handy. Still would like to know how to configure the repo so it doesn't merge by default. –  wufoo May 16 '12 at 20:35
    
IMO, you won't be able to do it in one command, you'll have to use multiple command, and either have to use a function or a git alias. There's nothing wrong with that behavior, you get a warning (with the M ... line), and like knitti pointed out, it's not a merge, just a working tree modification that isn't attached to any branch until you commit. And you either can discard the changes (reset), stash them, or commit them after or before the checkout. Can you tell us why do you want to change this behavior? –  KurzedMetal May 17 '12 at 11:47
    
I've done some more experimenting and I see now what nitti meant. Git is applying the changes when I change branches, but not making them permanent. If I have un-committed edits, and create a new branch, I can commit the change in the new branch and the other branches remain unchanged. The edits only affect files in the branch I do the commit on. I didn't realize git worked this way. Nope, I no longer wish to change the behaviour. I just needed to understand what git was doing. Thanks for the help! –  wufoo May 23 '12 at 14:18
    
That's what i thought :D, I'm glad i helped you to understand. –  KurzedMetal May 23 '12 at 14:44
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M stands for modified meaning, you have a modified version in your working directory. A.K.A. you have changes you have not yet committed.

Your uncommitted changes go along for the ride when you change branches. If you want to change branches, but are not ready to commit them you could stash them using git stash and later restore them using git stash pop

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Thanks! Is there a way to configure git to refuse to change branches if there are uncommitted edits? The man page for git-checkout mentions the -m flag to "refuse to switch branches", but then goes onto say it will end up doing a 3-way merge anyway. :/ –  wufoo May 16 '12 at 20:54
    
you could use the command git diff-files --quiet && git checkout branchName which first checks to see if there are any uncommitted changes, then does the checkout. This could be placed in a function in your bashrc, or you could alias a command to that, leaving branch name off. alias co="git diff-files --quiet && git checkout" –  JDwyer May 16 '12 at 21:08
    
If you are writing this in a bash function you could output an error message. checkout() { git diff-files --quiet && git checkout $1 || echo 'Uncommitted changes, commit or stash'} –  JDwyer May 16 '12 at 21:16
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