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This looks very trivial and is not a home work question.

public void sum(int[] arr){
  for(int i=0;i<arr.length;i++)
  {
    for(int j=0;j<arr.length;j++)
      System.out.println(arr[i]+"+"+arr[j]+"+"+"="+(arr[i]+arr[j]));
  }   
}//end of sum function

This prints all the sum of each elements. This is O(n^2).

I want to know if this could be solved more efficiently.

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it is single dimensional array right! then y do u need 2 for loops? –  Mohamed Jameel May 16 '12 at 20:28
    
@Jameelopix The OP is adding every element in the array to every other element in the array. –  Hunter McMillen May 16 '12 at 20:28
1  
Most of the time is spent building strings and writing to the console. The additions are likely to be a fraction of a ms for over 1000 entries. –  Peter Lawrey May 16 '12 at 20:30
    
Agree with Peter, but also there's no getting around it... this is an O(n^2) problem! Note that O(n^2)/2 is O(n^2) –  Bohemian May 16 '12 at 20:35
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since A + B is equal to B + A, you could just check the elements after the initial element in index i:

public void sum(int[] arr){
  for(int i=0;i<arr.length;i++)
  {
    for(int j=i;j<arr.length;j++) //Note: j = i, not j = 0
      System.out.println(arr[i]+"+"+arr[j]+"+"+"="+(arr[i]+arr[j]));
  }   
}//end of sum function

It's still O(n^2)/2, so the complexity is still basically quadratic.

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1  
better than quadratic isn't possible for this problem –  Hunter McMillen May 16 '12 at 20:32
    
In addition, use of (a) dedicated hardware (FPGAs) or (b) parallel processing can dramatically speed up the work –  atk May 16 '12 at 20:34
    
This was my solution too but you were faster so I guess you get my vote. But to get the same output he would need to store the previous results and fetch and print them for all numbers 0 through i before jumping into the inner loop. –  digitaljoel May 16 '12 at 20:34
    
if you have n cores on a gpu like cuda, you could reduce the task by n and finish it in 1 pass. –  edocetirwi May 16 '12 at 20:35
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You can add matrices faster if you use sparse matrices. Since 0 + 0 = 0, a sparse matrix allows you to skip performing addition on those elements.

Otherwise, as others have said you can parrallelize the problem quite easily as well.

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Do you care about the order in which the results are printed out? If you don't maybe you can split the task and look at parallel reduction.

I've not tested it, but something in these lines

public void sum(int[] arr){
for(int i=0;i<arr.length;i++)
{
   for(int j=0;j<arr.length/2;j=+2)
   System.out.println(arr[i]+"+"+arr[j]+"+"+"="+(arr[i]+arr[j]));
   System.out.println(arr[i+1]+"+"+arr[j+1]+"+"+"="+(arr[i+1]+arr[j+1]));
}   
}//end of sum function
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I do not care about the order as long as all the elements are added to each other ! –  Sanjay Rao May 17 '12 at 4:54
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