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Is there any way in Haskell (using ghc), to use a value of a data type directly without using pattern matching like in object-oriented programming languages (e.g. obj.a or obj->a) ?

I searching for something like this:

data Obj = Obj {a :: Int, b :: Int}

some :: Obj -> Int
some o = o.a
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1  
"without using pattern matching like in object-oriented programming languages" – Well, message dispatch is a form of pattern matching, is it not? It is most obvious in Erlang, but it is true of Smalltalk as well. – Jörg W Mittag May 17 '12 at 13:23

The closest you can get is Haskell's records, which looks like this:

data Obj = Obj {a :: Int, b :: Int}

which will automatically give you the functions:

a :: Obj -> Int
b :: Obj -> Int

which can be called like normal functions (type annotations for clarity):

(a (o :: Obj)) :: Int

Learn you a Haskell has a good chapter on them.

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Yes, you're already halfway there. By using record syntax, you've automatically created the functions

a (Obj x _) = x
b (Obj _ x) = x

So you can access the a value with a myObject.

But yes, as you can see, it does boil down to pattern matching.

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some = a (or equivalently, some obj = a obj) is exactly what you want in this case. When you use the record notation, you automatically define functions to select those fields. In other words,

data Obj = Obj {a :: Int, b :: Int}

is actually syntactic sugar for something like

data Obj = Obj Int Int

a :: Obj -> Int
a (Obj x _) = x

b :: Obj -> Int
b (Obj _ x) = x
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The RecordWildCards language extension is also helpful.

{-# LANGUAGE RecordWildCards #-}

data Obj = Obj {a :: Int, b :: Int}

some :: Obj -> Int
some Obj{..} = a + b
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