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I am trying to implement a mouseover effect in Qt, but I don't know how to use the event handlers. I have created a simple Qt Widget Application with a pushButton. I am able to bind an event handler to the MainWindow like so:

MainWindow::enterEvent(QEvent *event)
{
    ui->pushButton_3->setGraphicsEffect(effect);
}

This works, the graphicsEffect is applied to the pushButton. But I don't understand how to bind the event handler to a single QObject. As far as I know is it not possible to use signals, because they only support click events and no mouseover events.

I am pretty new to Qt and I was not able to find any information I could understand.

Can anyone explain to me how to bind an event handler to a single QObject?

Thanks in advance.

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1  
In Qt, you don't really "bind" event handlers. You just re-implement the methods on a subclass to do something new. Also, QObject classes have default signals that they were designed with, but you can emit your own custom signals and connect to them. – jdi May 16 '12 at 22:21
    
How would I emit these custom signals? (I am a newb) – Qurben May 16 '12 at 22:22
2  
You should probably just read a basic tutorial to get the fundamentals down: sector.ynet.sk/qt4-tutorial/…. There are some great books out there too. – jdi May 16 '12 at 22:23
    
I will look into this, thank you for the help – Qurben May 16 '12 at 22:25
    
If all you want to do is apply a graphics effect, you actually can easily just install event filters to do this without having to subclass every different type of widget you want to do this for. I'll whip up an example in a bit. – cgmb May 16 '12 at 22:48
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I figured it out, in another way, by using the 'Promote to ...' option in the QtCreator. As also explained here: http://sector.ynet.sk/qt4-tutorial/customing-widgets.html

I added a class 'MyPushButton":

mypushbutton.h

#ifndef MYPUSHBUTTON_H
#define MYPUSHBUTTON_H

#include <QPushButton>
#include <QGraphicsDropShadowEffect>

class MyPushButton : public QPushButton
{
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    MyPushButton(QWidget *parent = 0);

private:
    void enterEvent(QEvent *e);
    void leaveEvent(QEvent *e);

    QGraphicsDropShadowEffect *effect;
};

#endif // MYPUSHBUTTON_H

mypushbutton.cpp

#include "mypushbutton.h"

MyPushButton::MyPushButton(QWidget *parent)
    :QPushButton(parent)
{
    effect = new QGraphicsDropShadowEffect();
    effect->setBlurRadius(5);
    effect->setEnabled(false);
    this->setGraphicsEffect(effect);
}

void MyPushButton::enterEvent(QEvent *event)
{
    if (this->isEnabled())
        effect->setEnabled(true);
}

void MyPushButton::leaveEvent(QEvent *event)
{
    if (this->isEnabled())
        effect->setEnabled(false);
}

and then I right clicked my QPushButton in the editor and I selected 'Promote to ...' and I added MyPushButton as 'Promoted class name'.

It works like a charm and is very easy to expand or customize as it works with any event.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks good! That's a very sensible way of solving your problem and your answer is very clear. – cgmb May 17 '12 at 16:21

If you're working with a QPushButton, it's described pretty well here:

http://www.developer.nokia.com/Community/Wiki/How_to_use_QPushButton_in_Qt

For enter and leave events, look here: Finding current mouse position in QT

If, for example, you make something that inherits from QGraphicsRectItem, you can override the mouse event like this:

class BTNodeGraphicsItem : public QGraphicsRectItem
{
protected:
    virtual void mousePressEvent(QGraphicsSceneMouseEvent* event);
    // other class stuff
};

Then

void BTNodeGraphicsItem::mousePressEvent(QGraphicsSceneMouseEvent* event)
{
    // do stuff here
}

If you want the event to go further, then you add

QGraphicsRectItem::mousePressEvent(event);

in the handler routine.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't quite understand, should I create a new class which inherits QPushButton and add the code there? And how would I add this new QPushButton to my MainWindow? – Qurben May 16 '12 at 22:01
    
You didn't say you had an actual QPushButton in your question. Answer edited. – Almo May 16 '12 at 22:03
    
In the example I used a pushButton. I also stated that I needed a mouseover effect, with enterEvent and leaveEvent, or something else. As far as I know is this not possible with standard signals – Qurben May 16 '12 at 22:05
1  
Be very clear: pushButton or QPushButton? It matters. – Almo May 16 '12 at 22:06
    
I am not sure, I dragged a QPushButton in the scene with the editor – Qurben May 16 '12 at 22:07

If you want to specify a behaviour dependant on events for QWidgets without subclassing every single one of them, it's possible to use event filters. Create an event filter, as described by Qt's documentation, and apply it the the widgets in question.

I wrote a simple example below, but note that using filters in this way becomes increasingly complex as you begin to have multiple interacting behaviours. I find they are most effective for simple behaviours that need to be applied across a number of different types of widgets.

class WidgetHoverEffectEnabler : public QObject
{
Q_OBJECT
public:
   WidgetHoverEffectEnabler(QObject* parent);

   virtual bool eventFilter(QObject* obj, QEvent* e);
};

WidgetHoverEffectEnabler::WidgetHoverEffectEnabler(QObject* parent)
: QObject(parent)
{
}

bool WidgetHoverEffectEnabler::eventFilter(QObject* obj, QEvent* e)
{
   if(QWidget* widget = qobject_cast<QWidget*>(obj))
   {
      QGraphicsEffect* effect = widget->graphicsEffect();
      if(effect)
      {
         if(e->type() == QEvent::Enter)
         {
            effect->setEnabled(true);
         }
         else if(e->type() == QEvent::Leave)
         {
            effect->setEnabled(false);
         }
      }
   }
   return QObject::eventFilter(obj, e);
}

Then you can install that filter on your widgets during their initialization:

// works on your button
QPushButton* button = new QPushButton;
QGraphicsDropShadowEffect* dropShadowEffect = new QGraphicsDropShadowEffect;
dropShadowEffect->setEnabled(false);
button->setGraphicsEffect(dropShadowEffect);
button->installEventFilter(new WidgetHoverEffectEnabler(button));

// works on any widget
QLabel* label = new QLabel("Read me!");
QGraphicsBlurEffect* blurEffect = new QGraphicsBlurEffect;
blurEffect->setEnabled(false);
label->setGraphicsEffect(blurEffect);
label->installEventFilter(new WidgetHoverEffectEnabler(label));
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