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I want A user to do some jobs as B user. It's OK if B is root, but non-root user failed. Here are basic codes:

root.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main()
{
    setuid( 0 );
    system( "/tmp/script_of_root.sh" );

    return 0;
}

script_of_root.sh:

#!/bin/sh
echo $RANDOM >> /tmp/file_of_root

playback:

$ cd /tmp
$ cc root.c -o root
$ su -
# chown root.root /tmp/root
# chmod 4755 /tmp/root
# exit
$ ./root

After executing "./root", file "/tmp/file_of_root" will be updated. But if I apply the same thing to a non-root user, it doesn't work. Codes:

foobar.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main()
{
    setuid( 1001 );    // uid of user "foobar"
    system( "/tmp/script_of_foobar.sh" );

    return 0;
}

script_of_foobar.sh:

#!/bin/sh
echo $RANDOM >> /tmp/file_of_foobar

playback:

$ cd /tmp
$ cc foobar.c -o foobar
$ su -
# chown foobar.users /tmp/foobar
# chmod 4755 /tmp/foobar
# exit
$ ./foobar

If I run "./foobar" as other normal user(not "foobar" itself), it's gonna be error:

/tmp/script_of_foobar.sh: line 2: file_of_foobar: Permission denied

I am totally confused. Why the second scenario not working?

Best regards.

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Can you check the return value from your setuid(1001) call and perror() if the result isn't zero? –  sarnold May 16 '12 at 23:08
    
What are the permissions of /tmp? Does the foobar user have write permission to /tmp? –  Adam Rosenfield May 16 '12 at 23:44
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2 Answers 2

The setuid call in foobar.c will only succeed if you are root, or your effective UID is 1001.

So. If you're not root, setuid(1001) will fail, and you won't have the required rights to overwrite the file owned by "foobar".

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No way to workaround? I could use sudo for some reasons. –  vvoody May 17 '12 at 7:36
    
Try seteuid(1001). You've got the setuid bit set on the binary, but just to make sure you haven't mucked things up, I'd suggest that you printf ("%d\n", geteuid ()); just before you invoke system(). –  Jonathan May 17 '12 at 23:06
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From the output it looks like your non-root user is able to execute script_of_foobar.sh, but unable to write to /tmp/file_of_foobar. Are the permissions on /tmp possibly off? I believe it should be set to 1777.

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