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I've been told that programming to interfaces for local variables is useless and should not be done as it only hurts performance and offers no benefit.

public void foo() {
    ArrayList<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    // do list-y stuff with numbers
}

instead of

public void foo() {
    List<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    // do list-y stuff with numbers
}

I feel like the performance hit is negligible but admittedly there's not much to gain by using List semantics of ArrayList. Are there strong reasons to go one way or the other?

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18  
Who is the person who told you it would "hurt performance"? You should probably consider ignoring advice from him/her in the future. –  Kirk Woll May 16 '12 at 22:39
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7 Answers

Take this class for example:

public class Tmp {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ArrayList<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        numbers.add(1);
    }
}

It compiles down to this:

Compiled from "Tmp.java"
public class Tmp extends java.lang.Object{
public Tmp();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   new #2; //class java/util/ArrayList
   3:   dup
   4:   invokespecial   #3; //Method java/util/ArrayList."<init>":()V
   7:   astore_1
   8:   aload_1
   9:   iconst_1
   10:  invokestatic    #4; //Method java/lang/Integer.valueOf:(I)Ljava/lang/Integer;
   13:  invokevirtual   #5; //Method java/util/ArrayList.add:(Ljava/lang/Object;)Z
   16:  pop
   17:  return

}

While this class:

public class Tmp {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        numbers.add(1);
    }
}

compiles down to this:

Compiled from "Tmp.java"
public class Tmp extends java.lang.Object{
public Tmp();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   new #2; //class java/util/ArrayList
   3:   dup
   4:   invokespecial   #3; //Method java/util/ArrayList."<init>":()V
   7:   astore_1
   8:   aload_1
   9:   iconst_1
   10:  invokestatic    #4; //Method java/lang/Integer.valueOf:(I)Ljava/lang/Integer;
   13:  invokeinterface #5,  2; //InterfaceMethod java/util/List.add:(Ljava/lang/Object;)Z
   18:  pop
   19:  return

}

You'll see that the only difference is the first one (using an ArrayList) makes a call to invokevirtual and the other one (using List uses) invokeinterface. invokeinterface is actually a hair slower than invokevirtual (~38% according to this guy). This is apparently due to optimizations the JVM can make when searching through a concrete class's virtual method tables versus an interface's method tables. So what you're saying is actually true. Interface invocations are slower than concrete class invocations.

However, you have to consider what sorts of speed we're talking about. For 100,000,000 invocations, the actual difference was .03 seconds. So you have to have a ton of invocations to actually have a significant decrease in speed.

On the other hand, as @ChinBoon points out, coding to an interface makes it significantly easier for those using your code, especially if your code returns some sort List. So in the vast majority of cases, the ease of coding far outweighs the relative performance expense.


Added after reading @MattQuigley's comment and giving it a think on the drive home

What all this means is that this isn't something you should worry about too much. Any performance gain or penalty is likely to be very small.

Keep in mind, using the interface for your return types and your parameters on methods is a Very Good Idea. That allows you and anybody who uses your code to use whatever implementation of List best suits their needs. My example also shows that, if you happen to use a method that returns List, 99% of the time, you are not better off casting it to a concrete class just to get a performance boost. The time it takes to cast will likely outweigh the gain in performance.

That being said, this example also shows that, for a local variable, you are indeed better off using a concrete class rather than an interface. If the only methods you use are methods on List, then you can switch out implementing classes with no side effects. Plus you would have access to the implementation specific methods should you need them. Plus there is a minor performance boost.

tl;dr

Always use interfaces for return types and parameters on methods. It's a good idea to use concrete classes for local variables. It gives minor performance gains and there is no cost to switching implementations if the only methods you use are on the interface. In the end, you shouldn't worry about it too much. (Except the return types and parameters thing. That's important.)

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Yeah the benchmark is a little naive. However, the relative slowness of invokeinterface is fairly well documented. The degree to which this is true may vary after a VM warmup, but it's still going to be true. –  Tim Pote May 16 '12 at 23:28
    
Seems you're right. I can reproduce, even after warm up. Do you have any reference to a good explanation of this? –  aioobe May 16 '12 at 23:29
    
@aioobe Yeah I added a little blurb about it in a revision of my answer. I found the explanation in this SO answer. Not exactly reputable, but it is an explanation (that sounds plausible). –  Tim Pote May 16 '12 at 23:32
    
@TimPote I simply disagree that declaring it as a List makes anything easier. Nothing was made easier. Why do you say "easier"? Someone needs a LinkedList for quick removal, someone needs an ArrayList for quick random access. A List declaration disguises this fact, making things perhaps harder. And it's easy as heck to change ArrayList to a LinkedList at a later point in time, given that it's a local variable. –  Matt Quigley May 16 '12 at 23:49
    
@MattQuigley This question was asked with the premise of if you don't need a specific concrete class. If you need an method specific to class X, then you must use class X. However, if you need just a generic list, not a specific type of list then there is no downside to just declaring it as a List. (Well, other than the negligible performance decrease that this answer discusses.) –  Corbin May 17 '12 at 0:12
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Does the best practice of 'programming to interfaces' apply to local variables?

Even though the scope of such variable is smaller than the scope of a member variable, most of the benefits for coding against interfaces when it comes to member variables apply also to local variables.

Unless you need ArrayList specific methods, go for a List.

I feel like the performance hit is negligible but admittedly there's not much to gain by using List semantics of ArrayList

I have never heard that invocations of interface methods would be slower than invoking methods on a class type.

Using ArrayList instead of List as static type sounds like premature optimization to me. As usual, favor readability and maintainability over optimizations until you've profiled your program as a whole.

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If you need arraylist specific methods, you could do a downcast from a list. –  Oh Chin Boon May 16 '12 at 23:01
2  
@aioobe You've said that it is better because it's more flexible without explaining why it's more flexible to use List over ArrayList. Care to explain? Remember, we're only talking local variables here. –  Matt Quigley May 16 '12 at 23:52
1  
@MattQuigley, in this specific question the focus was on local variables. Why it is a good idea to code against interfaces in general has been answered in great detail elsewhere. I encourage you to read up on for instance this question or this one. –  aioobe May 16 '12 at 23:59
4  
@aioobe I think you misunderstood. I know why it's a good idea to code against interfaces in general. What I'm saying is you wrote in your answer that it's also better as a local variable for the same reasons without explaining why. I believe people think it's better without understanding why, just because it's done elsewhere. One isn't protecting oneself against changing implementations in the future because it is a local variable and easily changed. I don't see the "more flexible" argument for the very reason that it is a local variable. And it can't be swapped out for tests - it's local! –  Matt Quigley May 17 '12 at 0:06
1  
@MattQuigley In my opinion, there is benefit to always programming to the most general abstraction, even when working with local variables. The List interface is simpler than the ArrayList interface, and if what I'm trying to do only requires List semantics, I do not need to program against the ArrayList interface which has extra methods unrelated to what I'm trying to do. The improved developer experience of not having to see a bunch of unnecessary methods when programming is worth the practically negligible performance hit to me. –  Matthew May 17 '12 at 6:16
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TLDR: Method invocations are slower on interfaces/abstract classes, and there is virtually no impediment to changing the implementation of a local variable at a later point in time which makes most arguments a moot point.

There are a lot of answers here that are blindly saying to declare local variables as interfaces without understanding why. First of all, the method invocation is slower - about 3x, as I recall in tests. The add method in the first code block is 3 times as slow as the second. You can test this yourself with a simple test which measures elapsed time in a for loop.

List<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();
numbers.add(1); // slower

ArrayList<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();
numbers.add(1); // faster

Second of all, the question is about local variables, not the object oriented design principles of interfaces in general. There are good OO reasons that a public class method would return an interface or abstract class (List) instead of the implementation (ArrayList). You can read about such reasons elsewhere, but this question is not about that - it's about local variables. 99.999% of times you will never change the implementation of that local variable from an ArrayList to a Vector. However, in the .001% times you actually do, there is no impediment to doing so - you simply copy and paste the word Vector over the word ArrayList and you're done. Everyone seems to think that such a change is difficult. It's not.

Third, a LinkedList is not the same thing as an ArrayList. You choose one or the other for a reason (time it takes to access/append/insert/delete). Declaring it as an ArrayList is an affirmation that lets you know that this local variable is meant for speedy random access. The argument that it is premature optimization is silly - it is optimized one way or the other as soon as it's instantiated.

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this question has been asked several times; and the right answers always got lowest points:) stackoverflow.com/questions/3768869/… –  irreputable May 17 '12 at 2:17
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Use the most abstract type that allows you to get the job done. If you only need List, then use it. If you need to restrict the type to something more concrete, then use that instead. For example, in some cases using List would be too concrete, and using Collection would be preferred. As another example, someone might want to require a ConcurrentMap instead of a regular Map in some situations.

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Especially if the method returns the list, coding to interface would have helped you if you had to change the implementation to a linked list one day. And that's one benefit, you would not need to change the method to return a linked list or a arraylist.

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+1 The best answer so far. –  GETah May 16 '12 at 22:46
1  
I'm not sure I get this answer. The OP asks about the type of a local variable, not the return type of the method. (His example even returns void.) Even if a method would be declared to return a List<Integer>, you could very well return a variable with ArrayList<Integer> as static type. –  aioobe May 16 '12 at 22:47
    
@aioobe all the answers have already presented that pov, I decided to expand out. –  Oh Chin Boon May 16 '12 at 22:55
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here's a suggestion: declare the List as final, but with the interface.

final List<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();

If i had to take a guess (and i'm not an expert on the java compiler itself), but making the variable final, the compiler should be able to remove the invokeinterface in favor of invokevirtual, since it knows the type won't change once the variable is declared.

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1  
Unfortunately, the final keyword on local variables doesn't give any benefit to performance. Final on local variables gives nothing for the compiler to use. The only benefit is for design semantics. –  Matt Quigley May 17 '12 at 17:43
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Yes @Matthew, is much better the best practices using

List<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>

because can you use the methods the ArrayList class and List class. I hope help you.

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because can you use the methods the ArrayList class and List class -- No, (A) you can't for instance do numbers.ensureCapacity(10) (B) List is not a class. –  aioobe May 16 '12 at 22:51
    
Ok, Java is all class's. Thank you. –  hekomobile May 16 '12 at 22:56
    
((ArrayList)numbers).ensureCapacity(10) –  Oh Chin Boon May 16 '12 at 23:04
    
Thank you @Chin Boon. –  hekomobile May 16 '12 at 23:05
    
@hekomobile I think aioobe meant that List is an interface. –  Oh Chin Boon May 16 '12 at 23:06
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