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I have a list of words sorted using g_ascii_strcasecmp function. I need to process this list in java. What is the equivalent sorting function in java? In order to implement binary search I need a correct comparison function. So far I have the function below but it is not always produces the correct result.

public int compareStrings(String str) {
    Collator collator = Collator.getInstance();//TODO: implement locale?
    return collator.compare(this.wordString, str);
}

UPDATE. List example: "T, t, T'ai Chi Ch'uan, t'other, T-, T-bone, T-bone steak, T-junction, tabasco, Tabassaran, tabby".

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I decided to share the method I came up with:

    /**
     * Compares two strings, ignoring the case of ASCII characters. It treats
     * non-ASCII characters taking in account case differences. This is an 
     * attempt to mimic glib's string utility function 
     * <a href="http://developer.gnome.org/glib/2.28/glib-String-Utility-Functions.html#g-ascii-strcasecmp">g_ascii_strcasecmp ()</a>.
     *
     * This is a slightly modified version of java.lang.String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER.compare(String s1, String s2) method.
     * 
     * @param str1  string to compare with str2
     * @param str2  string to compare with str1
     * @return      0 if the strings match, a negative value if str1 < str2, or a positive value if str1 > str2
     */
    private static int compareToIgnoreCaseASCIIOnly(String str1, String str2) {
        int n1 = str1.length();
        int n2 = str2.length();
        int min = Math.min(n1, n2);
        for (int i = 0; i < min; i++) {
            char c1 = str1.charAt(i);
            char c2 = str2.charAt(i);
            if (c1 != c2) {
                if ((int) c1 > 127 || (int) c2 > 127) { //if non-ASCII char
                    return c1 - c2;
                } else {
                    c1 = Character.toUpperCase(c1);
                    c2 = Character.toUpperCase(c2);
                    if(c1 != c2) {
                        c1 = Character.toLowerCase(c1);
                        c2 = Character.toLowerCase(c2);
                        if(c1 != c2) {
                            return c1 - c2;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        return n1 - n2;
    }
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I wouldn't use Collator, having read its Javadoc, because you have no control over how the strings get compared. You can pick the locale, but how that locale tells Collator how to compare strings is out of your hands.

If you know that the characters in your strings are all ASCII characters, then I'd just use the String.compareTo() method, which sorts lexicographically based on unicode character value. If all the characters in the strings are ASCII characters, their unicode character value will be their ASCII value and so sorting lexicographically on their unicode value will be the same as sorting lexicographically on their ASCII value, which appears to be what g_ascii_stcasecmp does. And if you need case-insensitivity, you could use String.compareToIgnoreCase().


As I noted in the comment, I think you'll need to write your own comparison function. You'll need to loop through the characters in the string, skipping over the ones that aren't in the ASCII range. So something like this, which is a simple, stupid implementation and needs to be beefed up to cover the corner cases I imagine g_ascii_strcasecmp does:

public int compareStrings(String str) {
    List<Character> myAsciiChars = onlyAsciiChars(this.wordString);
    List<Character> theirAsciiChars = onlyAsciiChars(str);

    if (myAsciiChars.size() > theirAsciiChars.size()) {
        return 1;
    }
    else if (myAsciiChars.size() < theirAsciiChars.size()) {
        return -1;
    }

    for (int i=0; i < myAsciiChars.size(); i++) {
        if (myAsciiChars.get(i) > theirAsciiChars.get(i)) {
            return 1;
        }
        else if (myAsciiChars.get(i) < theirAsciiChars.get(i)) {
            return -1;
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

private final static char MAX_ASCII_VALUE = 127; // (Or 255 if using extended ASCII)

private List<Character> onlyAsciiChars(String s) {
    List<Character> asciiChars = new ArrayList<>();
    for (char c : s.toCharArray()) {
        if (c <= MAX_ASCII_VALUE) {
            asciiChars.add(c);
        }
    }
    return asciiChars;
}
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I know that there non ASCII characters there. The original encoding is UTF-8 and any possible character could be there like ò, ø, æ, î, ю, ж, ё. –  bancer May 16 '12 at 23:47
    
Then that won't work because according to your link, g_ascii_strcasecmp ignores non-ASCII characters when doing the comparison. String.compareTo/compareToIgnoreCase won't. I think you are going to have to write your own comparison function. –  QuantumMechanic May 16 '12 at 23:53
    
Thanks a lot for your help. I think "treating all non-ASCII bytes as if they are not letters" in g_ascii_strcasecmp does not mean that non ASCII characters are ignored but that they are treated as bytes (or similar). I think I have figured out what to do. –  bancer May 17 '12 at 1:01

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