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I am having trouble doing the simplest of Perl REGEX. It is working correctly in Notepad++ but not Perl.

open FILE, "Something.txt";
while (<FILE>) {
   s/./f/;
    print;
}

However the output only changes the first letter of each line to F. When this regular expression is clearly saying change every character to F!

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Read the documentation. The substitution operator is clearly working as described: perldoc.perl.org/perlop.html#Regexp-Quote-Like-Operators –  toolic May 16 '12 at 23:59

4 Answers 4

i haven't used perl in a while, but try s/./f/g (the g makes it global, rather than stopping after the first match, according to Quentin in comments (thanks)).

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1  
Start of line would be s/^./g/. Global means it doesn't stop after the first match. –  Quentin May 16 '12 at 23:07

See the following sample code :

The fle :

$ cat /tmp/test
aaaa
bbbb
cccc

The Perl code (I use perlconsole)

Perl> open FH, "<", "/tmp/test"
1

Perl> while (<FH>) { s/./f/g; print; }
ffff
ffff
ffff


Perl> close FH
1

Perl> 

The g modifier in the substitution means all occurrences, see http://perldoc.perl.org/perlre.html#Modifiers

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Mhhhhh ? What's going on (why down voted ?) ? Have you tested this code ? :/ –  sputnick May 16 '12 at 23:10
1  
You appear to have, with more code but less clarity, repeated the question … without actually answering it. –  Quentin May 16 '12 at 23:10
    
Yeah, see my edited post, just forgot the g modifier –  sputnick May 16 '12 at 23:12
    
After the edit, the sample output doesn't match what I'd expect the (edited) code to output, or what the asker was looking for. It also falls into the category of a "spot-the-difference solution" that fails to highlight what has changed or explain why. –  Quentin May 16 '12 at 23:14
    
Edited again to explain what's changed. =) –  sputnick May 16 '12 at 23:19

You need to add the g modifier to make it global, otherwise it will stop after the first match.

s/./f/g
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Is there a reason for the trailing slash? –  Borodin May 17 '12 at 0:16

You need to flag it for global change:

open FILE, "Something.txt";
while (<FILE>) {
   s/./f/g;
    print;
}
CLOSE (FILE);
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