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I am working on an application that uses Swing. I have a JTabbedPane, and each tab is considered a 'page.' Each page contains 4 normal panels (I refer to them as 'views') that are arranged according to 2x2 GridLayout.

I want to minimize the amount of pages, so every time a view is removed, I want to re-sort all of the views across all of the pages (think two-dimensional arrays if it makes more sense) so that the views near the last page and removed from there, and are added to a page nearer the front.

Consider this example:

Object[][] array = new Object [][] {

    { new Object(), null, new Object(), new Object() },
    { null, null, new Object(), new Object() },
    { new Object(), new Object(), new Object(), new Object() }

};

How can I sort that array so that it looks more like:

Object[][] array = new Object[][] {

    { new Object(), new Object(), new Object(), new Object() },
    { new Object(), new Object(), new Object(), new Object() },
    { new Object(), null, null, null },

};

At first, I thought of using two loops, one going from 0 to array.length, and one going from array.length to 0. The idea was that: as the one going from length to 0 approaches 0, it would check whether or not the indices of the array going from 0 to length are empty. If so, it would place the non-null element in the index that contains null.

This approach gave me a headache because of all the looping so I asked a close friend of mine for a suggestion. He suggested a much more elegant solution: Arrays.sort(Object[][], Comparator).

This code was the result:

    Object[][] array = new Object[][] { { new Object(), null, new Object(), new Object() }, { null, null, new Object(), new Object() }, { new Object(), new Object(), new Object(), new Object() } };

    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < 4; j++)
        {
            System.out.println("Before sorting: (i = " + i + " j = " + j + " null = " + (array[i][j] == null) + ")");
        }
    }

    Arrays.sort(array, new Comparator<Object>()
    {

        public int compare(Object a, Object b)
        {
            return a == null ? (b == null ? 0 : -1) : (b == null ? 1 : 0);
        }

    });

    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < 4; j++)
        {
            System.out.println("After sorting: (i = " + i + " j = " + j + " null = " + (array[i][j] == null) + ")");
        }
    }

The output is:

Before sorting: (i = 0 j = 0 null = false)
Before sorting: (i = 0 j = 1 null = true)
Before sorting: (i = 0 j = 2 null = false)
Before sorting: (i = 0 j = 3 null = false)
Before sorting: (i = 1 j = 0 null = true)
Before sorting: (i = 1 j = 1 null = true)
Before sorting: (i = 1 j = 2 null = false)
Before sorting: (i = 1 j = 3 null = false)
Before sorting: (i = 2 j = 0 null = false)
Before sorting: (i = 2 j = 1 null = false)
Before sorting: (i = 2 j = 2 null = false)
Before sorting: (i = 2 j = 3 null = false)
After sorting: (i = 0 j = 0 null = false)
After sorting: (i = 0 j = 1 null = true)
After sorting: (i = 0 j = 2 null = false)
After sorting: (i = 0 j = 3 null = false)
After sorting: (i = 1 j = 0 null = true)
After sorting: (i = 1 j = 1 null = true)
After sorting: (i = 1 j = 2 null = false)
After sorting: (i = 1 j = 3 null = false)
After sorting: (i = 2 j = 0 null = false)
After sorting: (i = 2 j = 1 null = false)
After sorting: (i = 2 j = 2 null = false)
After sorting: (i = 2 j = 3 null = false)

Exactly the same. I have also tried replacing the compare(Object, Object) implementation with:

        public int compare(Object a, Object b)
        {
            if (a == null && b != null)
            {
                return -1;
            }
            if (b == null && a != null)
            {
                return 1;
            }
            return 0;
        }

... and have achieved the same results. I am kind of at a loss. This is not something that I do not have the knowledge to do, I just cannot wrap my head around how to actually create a solution for a problem like this.

I'd appreciate any help. Whichever way you prefer approaching it, the loop method or the Comparator method, I'd love to see it!

Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Did you mean

Object[][] array = new Object [][] { .. };

In your case, you need to convert 2-D array to array (1-D array). After sorting new array, you fill the 2-D array with the sorted array.

// convert to 1-D array
Object[] all = new Object[12];
int k = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 4; j++) {
        all[k++] = array[i][j];
    }
}

// then sort the new array
Arrays.sort(all, yourComparator);

// then fill the 2-D array with the sorted array
k = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 4; j++) {
        array[i][j] = all[k++];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent! This is exactly what I needed. Thank you very much! –  Martin Tuskevicius May 18 '12 at 3:17

You don't want to have nulls in your code, you don't want to check against null, you don't want to stumble upon a null, and you don't want a null to carry semantics.

Therefore you don't want an array.

If you like to use an Collection with varying size, don't use Arrays.

Use an ArrayList for example, easy to use, variable size, no need to use nulls.

If you remove element 2 from an ArrayList:

   List <JPanel> al = new ArrayList <JPanel> ();
   al.add (new JPanel ());
   al.add (new JPanel ());
   al.add (new JPanel ());
   al.add (new JPanel ());

   al.remove (1); // 0-based numbering like in Arrays. 

Now element 2 and 3 will slip one position to the front. How long is your Array now?

   System.out.println (al.size ()); 

No null in the List, no need to test against null, iteration?

   for (JPanel jp : al) 
        // do something to every jp.

Don't use null in your code, but ban it!

Don't use Arrays for collections of varying size!

share|improve this answer
    
That is a good suggestion. The problem is that I am kind of forced to use arrays because I access the JPanels using container.getComponents(), which returns an array. –  Martin Tuskevicius May 18 '12 at 1:06
    
You can java.util.Arrays.asList to convert Arrays to Lists. –  user unknown May 18 '12 at 1:15

Your example is unclear, and clearly doesn't match your real application requirements. (It makes no sense to sort a bunch of undifferentiated Object instances!)

So I'm going to take a stab ... and guess that you are really just trying to move the nulls to the end. (The other non-null elements were already sorted, and removing one / some won't alter that. Or maybe they don't need to be sorted at all ...)

If that is the case, then the simple way is to do this:

  • create a temporary 1-D array of the right size
  • iterate the the 2-D array in the order that you want the elements to appear ( e.g. rows within columns ) and copy the non-null elements into the 1-D array.
  • iterate the 2-D array again, copying back from the 1-D array.

Alternatively, if you DO need to sort the non-null elements, you can do the sorting in the 1-D array using Arrays.sort(Object[], int, int). Choose the bounds to exclude the nulls at the end of the array. This avoids the need to create a "complex" comparator that understands null.


Your current approach is just too complicated ... and unnecessarily complicated code is a bad idea.

And if your intention is to just move the nulls to the end while preserving the order of the other objects, then sort is an expensive way to do it. (It will work with the Comparator that you defined, because the sort(Object[] ...) methods are documented as doing a stable sort. But in this case, I'm tempted to say that it is unfortunate that it works.)

share|improve this answer
    
That's the point of the example. Obviously I'm not using vanilla Objects as part of my frame, but JPanels are still Objects, so the example is still valid. –  Martin Tuskevicius May 17 '12 at 4:58
    
"That's the point of the example" - Sorry. I don't get it. What is the point? Are you trying to demonstrate that it doesn't matter about the order of Object instances? That they have to be sorted? That they have to be kept in the original order? Are the JPanels comparable / sortable? Are they meant to be comparable? –  Stephen C May 17 '12 at 5:24
    
In short, your example is "valid" ... but it is not enlightening. –  Stephen C May 17 '12 at 5:36
    
I did not want to give specifics to prevent confusion. I figured if I used basic things, like Objects and nulls, it would be easier to understand than Swing components. –  Martin Tuskevicius May 18 '12 at 1:04

Reason your code is failing as you are just checking if the outer array is null or not, you should also check the contents of the outer array.

See this code:

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Comparator;

public class Test2DArrayComparator {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Object[][] array = new Object[][]{
                {new Object(), null, new Object(), new Object()}, 
                {null, null, new Object(), new Object()},
                {new Object(), new Object(), new Object(), new Object()}
                };

        for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < 4; j++) {
                System.out.println("Before sorting: (i = " + i + " j = " + j + " null = " + (array[i][j] == null) + ")");
            }
        }

        class ArrayComparator implements Comparator<Object>{

            @Override
            public int compare(Object a, Object b) {
                if(a == null && b == null){
                    return 0;
                } else if(a != null && b == null){
                    return 1;
                } else if(a == null && b != null){
                    return -1;
                } else {
                    return checkConents(((Object[])a), ((Object[])b));
                }
            }

        }
        Arrays.sort(array, new ArrayComparator());

        for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < 4; j++) {
                System.out.println("After sorting: (i = " + i + " j = " + j + " null = " + (array[i][j] == null) + ")");
            }
        }

    }

    static int checkConents(Object[] first, Object[] second){
        for(int iDx = 0; iDx < first.length; iDx++){
            if(first[iDx] != null && second[iDx] == null){
                return -1;
            } else if(first[iDx] == null && second[iDx] == null){
                return 0;
            } else if(first[iDx] == null && second[iDx] != null){
                return 1;
            }
        }
        return -1;
    }
}

After checking for the validity of outer array checkContent is called to compare the contents, also note checkContent assumes that both the array are of same size.

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Array is of type Object[][]. So when you do sort(array, theComparator) you are arranging each of the three Object[] that are held within array. You are not sorting the contents of each of those three arrays.

And since none of the three Object[] in array are null, your comparator returns zero on each comparison and so those Object[] stay in place within array.

So you'll need to convert to a 1-D array of Object, sort it, then break it back up into a 2-D array.

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