Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Truncate (not round) decimal places in SQL Server

Can't figure this out. I need 1 decimal place returned while SQL is rounding to whole numbers.

I read that integers divided by integers give integers in SQL, but I need the one truncated decimal place for value of output in the temp table.

I don't mind if 35.0 comes back as 35 but 35.17 should come back as 35.1. Sorry just edited. Need to truncate the last number, not round up.

create table #blah(output decimal(9,1))

DECLARE @a money
DECLARE @b money
DECLARE @intinterval decimal(9,1) 

SET @a = 5
SET @b = 2
SET @intinterval = (@b / 1000.0) * (86400.0 / @a)

INSERT INTO #blah (output) VALUES (@intinterval)

SELECT * from #blah

drop table #blah

The above equation should give (2 / 1000) * (86400 / 5) = (0.002 * 17280) = 34.56

The 34.56 should truncate to 34.5

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Michał Powaga, marc_s, Mikael Eriksson, kapa, Matt May 22 '12 at 12:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
what is the type of your @intinterval variable ? please edit your post. thanks –  Gaetano May 17 '12 at 3:20
    
What is the declaration for @intinterval? That is probably where your issue lies. If I substitute (@b / 1000.0) * (86400.0 / @a) for @intinterval in VALUES (@intinterval) I get two decimal places in the select statement results. –  Mark M May 17 '12 at 3:22
    
Refer this [link][1].You need to cast and use round function [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/5167299/… –  Krishnanunni Jeevan May 17 '12 at 3:23
    
Added @intinterval decimal(9,1) –  Patriotec May 17 '12 at 3:26
3  
Patriotec: You need to round to 1 decimal place, not 3. Try round(round((@mnyminbid / 1000.00) * (86400.00 / @mnybudget),1,1). Here's a SQL Fiddle with the calculation: sqlfiddle.com/#!3/c368d/5. Note that ROUND has three arguments. The second 1 is the number of decimal places. The final 1 in the ROUND is the indication to truncate instead of round up or down, whichever is closer. –  Steve Kass May 17 '12 at 4:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
SET @intinterval = cast(10 * (@b / 1000.0) * (86400.0 / @a) as int) / 10.0

or

SET @intinterval = cast(@b * 864.0 / @a as int) / 10.0
share|improve this answer
    
You answer works, but Steve Kass had the better solution. He answered in a comment, not in an answer. Thanks for the help –  Patriotec May 21 '12 at 19:02

What about Round((@b / 1000.0) * (86400.0 / @a), 1, 1), where last 1 saying to truncate instead of round.

share|improve this answer

try this with no special functions...

if
a = 5 then output = 34.5 (34.56)
a = 7 output = 24.6 (24.69)
a = 11 output = 15.7 (15.71)

create table #blah(output decimal(9,1))
DECLARE @a money
DECLARE @b money
DECLARE @intinterval decimal(9,2) 
declare @rounded decimal(9,1)    
declare @diff decimal(9,2)
declare @finalvalue decimal(9,1)
SET @a = 5
SET @b = 2
SET @intinterval = (@b / 1000.0) * (86400.0 / @a) 
set @rounded  = @intinterval    -- gets the rounded value
set @diff = @intinterval - @rounded  -- gets the difference whether to round off or not
if @diff >= 0           -- if differnce is >= 0 then get the rounded value  .. eg.   34.31 = 34.3
   set @finalvalue = @rounded 
else                     -- else  subtract 0.1 and get the rounded value  e.g.  34.56 - 0.1 = 34.46 -> rounded value of 34.5
   set @finalvalue = @intinterval - 0.1   
INSERT INTO #blah (output) VALUES (@finalvalue )
SELECT * from #blah
drop table #blah  
share|improve this answer
    
That is so much more complex than it needs to be. –  MatBailie May 17 '12 at 21:25
    
is not complex mate... just pure mathematics. the thing is he doesnt want it to be rounded off and functions are too expensive. –  Rhian A May 17 '12 at 21:28
    
It's more complex than it needs to be, as shown by the other answers here before yours. They give the same behaviour with less code, less cpu time, and can be embeded into a sql query much more directly. [I'm not sure what you mean when you assert that functions are too expensive? ROUND(x, 1, 1), for example, is both a function and less expensive in terms of CPU than this code...] –  MatBailie May 17 '12 at 21:34
    
let him be the judge. –  Rhian A May 17 '12 at 22:42

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.