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I want to have Map with duplicate keys, I know there are many Map implementations(eclipse shows me about 50), so I bet there must be one that allows this. I know its easy to write your own Map that does this, but i would rather use some existing solution. Maybe something in commons-collections or google-collections?

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How should this work? If you ask for a value associated with a key, and this key exists multiple times in the map, which value should be returned? –  Mnementh Jun 30 '09 at 10:37
    
get could throw exception, i need this map only for iteration. –  IAdapter Jun 30 '09 at 10:41
4  
If you only need it for iteration, why do you need a map in the first place? Use a list of pairs or something... –  Tal Pressman Jun 30 '09 at 10:46
2  
Because my whole program already works with Map and now i discovered that its possible for data to have duplicate keys. If using Map different way would be so wrong we would only have 5 implementations of Map and not 50+. –  IAdapter Jun 30 '09 at 11:03

11 Answers 11

up vote 37 down vote accepted

You are searching for a Multimap, and indeed both commons-collections and google-collections have several implementations for that. Multimaps allow for multiple keys by maintaining a collection of values per key, i.e. you can put a single object into the map, but you retrieve a collection.

If you can use Java 5, I would prefer google-collections as they are generics aware:

com.google.common.collect.Multimap

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2  
Also, this Multimap doesn't pretend to be a Map the way the apache one does. –  Kevin Bourrillion Nov 6 '09 at 10:16
4  
Note that Google Collections has been superseded by Guava, so here's the link to the Guava version of MultiMap: code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/wiki/… –  Josh Glover Aug 14 '12 at 12:35
    
However, Multimap is not fully serializable, it has transient members which renders a deserialized instance useless –  dschulten Jul 24 at 16:05
    
@dschulten Well, Multimap is an interface and you are not specifying which implementation you mean. com.google.common.collect.HashMultimap has readObject/writeObject methods, as do ArrayListMultimap and Immutable{List,Set}Multimap. I would consider a useless deserialized instance a bug worth reporting. –  nd. Jul 25 at 6:02

You could simply pass an array of values for the value in a regular HashMap, thus simulating duplicate keys, and it would be up to you to decide what data to use.

You may also just use a MultiMap, although I do not like the idea of duplicate keys myself.

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We don't need to depend on the Google Collections external library. You can simply implement the following Map:

Map<String, ArrayList<String>> hashMap = new HashMap<String, ArrayList>();

public static void main(String... arg) {
   // Add data with duplicate keys
   addValues("A", "a1");
   addValues("A", "a2");
   addValues("B", "b");
   // View data.
   Iterator it = hashMap.keySet().iterator();
   ArrayList tempList = null;

   while (it.hasNext()) {
      String key = it.next().toString();             
      tempList = hashMap.get(key);
      if (tempList != null) {
         for (String value: tempList) {
            System.out.println("Key : "+key+ " , Value : "+value);
         }
      }
   }
}

private void addValues(String key, String value) {
   ArrayList tempList = null;
   if (hashMap.containsKey(key)) {
      tempList = hashMap.get(key);
      if(tempList == null)
         tempList = new ArrayList();
      tempList.add(value);  
   } else {
      tempList = new ArrayList();
      tempList.add(value);               
   }
   hashMap.put(key,tempList);
}

Please make sure to fine tune the code.

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3  
You don't need to rely on Guava's Multimap, of course. It just eases your life, as you don't have to re-implement them, test them, etc. –  PhiLho Jul 30 '13 at 12:51

If you want iterate about a list of key-value-pairs (as you wrote in the comment), then a List or an array should be better. First combine your keys and values:

public class Pair
{
   public Class1 key;
   public Class2 value;

   public Pair(Class1 key, Class2 value)
   {
      this.key = key;
      this.value = value;
   }

}

Replace Class1 and Class2 with the types you want to use for keys and values.

Now you can put them into an array or a list and iterate over them:

Pair[] pairs = new Pair[10];
...
for (Pair pair : pairs)
{
   ...
}
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How would i implement add() or put(). I dont want to hardcore number of dimensions. –  articlestack Oct 14 '10 at 13:30
2  
In this case use a List. The second sample changes to List<Pair> pairs = new List<Pair>(); The for-loop stays the same. You can add a pair with this command: pairs.add(pair); –  Mnementh Oct 15 '10 at 14:59
    
This is probably the best answer to be honest. –  PaulBGD Jul 15 at 3:00

If there are duplicate keys then a key may correspond to more than one value. The obvious solution is to map the key to a list of these values. For example in python:

map = dict()
map["driver"] = list()
map["driver"].append("john")
map["driver"].append("mike")
print map["driver"]          # It shows john and mike
print map["driver"][0]       # It shows john
print map["driver"][1]       # It shows mike

Thanasis

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commons.apache.org

MultiValueMap class
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That class was deprecated. It is now called MultiValueMap. commons.apache.org/proper/commons-collections/javadocs/… –  Jotschi Aug 29 '13 at 12:58
    Multimap<Integer, String> multimap = ArrayListMultimap.create();

    multimap.put(1, "A");
    multimap.put(1, "B");
    multimap.put(1, "C");
    multimap.put(1, "A");

    multimap.put(2, "A");
    multimap.put(2, "B");
    multimap.put(2, "C");
    multimap.put(3, "A");


    System.out.println(multimap.get(1));
    System.out.println(multimap.get(2));

out put is:

[A,B,C,A]

[A,B,C,A]

Note : we need to import library files

import com.google.common.collect.ArrayListMultimap;
import com.google.common.collect.Multimap;

or

import org.apache.commons.collections.MultiMap;
import org.apache.commons.collections.map.MultiValueMap;
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Could you also explain the context for which you are trying to implement a map with duplicate keys? I am sure there could be a better solution. Maps are intended to keep unique keys for good reason. Though if you really wanted to do it; you can always extend the class write a simple custom map class which has a collision mitigation function and would enable you to keep multiple entries with same keys.

Note: You must implement collision mitigation function such that, colliding keys are converted to unique set "always". Something simple like, appending key with object hashcode or something?

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The context is that i thought that keys will be unique, but it turns out that the might not be. I dont want to refactor everything since it wont be used often. –  IAdapter Jun 30 '09 at 11:05
    
i want to convert a small XML file into hashmap like datatype. Only the problem is structure of XML file is not fixed –  articlestack Oct 14 '10 at 13:32

just to be complete, Apache Commons Collections also has a MultiMap. The downside of course is that Apache Commons does not use Generics.

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1  
Note that their MultiMap implements Map but breaks the contracts of the Map methods. That bugs me. –  Kevin Bourrillion Nov 6 '09 at 10:15

Learn from my mistakes...please don't implement this on your own. Guava multimap is the way to go. A common enhancement required in multimaps is to disallow duplicate keys-value pairs.

Implementing/changing this in a your implementation can be annoying.

In guava its as simple as:

HashMultimap no_dupe_key_plus_val = HashMultimap.create();

ArrayListMultimap allow_dupe_key_plus_val = ArrayListMultimap.create();

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I had a slightly different variant of this issue: It was required to associate two different values with same key. Just posting it here in case it helps others, I have introduced a HashMap as the value:

/* @param frameTypeHash: Key -> Integer (frameID), Value -> HashMap (innerMap)
   @param innerMap: Key -> String (extIP), Value -> String
   If the key exists, retrieve the stored HashMap innerMap 
   and put the constructed key, value pair
*/
  if (frameTypeHash.containsKey(frameID)){
            //Key exists, add the key/value to innerHashMap
            HashMap innerMap = (HashMap)frameTypeHash.get(frameID);
            innerMap.put(extIP, connName+":"+frameType+":"+interfaceName);

        } else {
            HashMap<String, String> innerMap = new HashMap<String, String>();
            innerMap.put(extIP, connName+":"+frameType+":"+interfaceName);
            // This means the key doesn't exists, adding it for the first time
            frameTypeHash.put(frameID, innerMap );
        }
}

In the above code the key frameID is read from a input file's first string in each line, the value for frameTypeHash is constructed by splitting the remaining line and was stored as String object originally, over a period of time the file started having multiple lines (with different values) associated with same frameID key, so frameTypeHash was overwritten with last line as the value. I replaced the String object with another HashMap object as the value field, this helped in maintaining single key to different value mapping.

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