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I've looked at a few other try catch finally questions on here but I'm not sure that this one has been answered. Does it smell bad to do something like:

Exception? ex = null;
try { //something }
catch (Exception e) { ex = e ;}
finally {
    DoSomething();        
}
... //more code

//end of method
if (ex !=null) { throw ex; }

Basically, I'm trying to ensure that certain code (outside of the try/catch/finally) is run and that an exception is thrown if one happens, but not until after said code runs. I can't put all the code in the finally block because it's outside of some conditionals.

If this does, in fact, smell bad (I suspect it does), how would one achieve this?

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What useful things you do in places inside that catch and after finally that disallow removing catch altogether and letting exception propagate? I guess if you throw ex; you get less info later when you catch it (like source and such). – Eugene Ryabtsev May 17 '12 at 5:27
up vote 6 down vote accepted

That is definitely a code smell. Re-throwing the exception at the end of the method will overwrite the call stack of the exception so it will appear that all exceptions occurred at the end of the method instead of where they really occurred.

If you can't place the extra code in the existing finally, you create nested try..finally blocks:

try {
  try { //something }
  finally {
      DoSomething();        
  }
   ... //more code
}
finally {
  // cleanup code
}

Note From OP: see this code for what this answer's author led me to correctly derive.

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i still want to throw the exception somewhere. where do i throw it in this example? – Jason May 17 '12 at 5:30
    
'throw;' at the end of the second finally{} block will rethrow the exception leaving the stack trace intact. – TheEvilPenguin May 17 '12 at 5:32
    
@TheEvilPenguin - throw at the end of the second finally block is a syntax error. – shf301 May 17 '12 at 5:33
1  
@Jason - Any exception that occurs (or you throw your self) will still be throw like normal and will propagate to the next catch block (Assuming no exception occurs in any of you finally's) – shf301 May 17 '12 at 5:34
1  
@Jason - yes in the linked code if DoSomething() throws an exception, Save() will run, DoSomethingElse() will run and the exception will still be thrown. – shf301 May 17 '12 at 5:48

Since you want to run "more code" even in the event of an exception, why not put "more code" in the finally? That's essentially what the finally is for - it's guarenteed to execute even if an exception happens

so:

try {
    // something 
} catch (Exception e) {

    ***// more code here***

    DoSomething();
    throw;
}

Storing ex and throw ex; will swallow inner expections. You want throw; to ensure nothing in the stack is swallowed.

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1  
I mentioned in the end of the post that I can't put all the code in the finally because it's outside of some conditional statements. – Jason May 17 '12 at 5:25

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