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In the following code echo $d prints value 0

#!/bin/sh
printf "Enter the IP address: "
read server
a=":"
b="["
c="]"
d=$b$server$c
echo $d
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$ ./test.sh Enter the IP address: 192.168.0.1 [192.168.0.1[. Seems to work for me. What shell are you using? (Also not that you do not use $c) –  carlpett May 17 '12 at 5:38
    
This script works correctly, how are you running it? –  birryree May 17 '12 at 5:39
    
Sorry it was typing mistake,code runs when I try to concatenate with $b but I want d as [IP_address] –  shraddha May 17 '12 at 5:44
    
Which shell are you using? This works fine in bash. –  Jim Garrison May 17 '12 at 5:57
2  
I grew up with a real Bourne shell; I'd use d="$b$server$c" automatically to avoid risks (and echo "$d" too). I doubt if you'd have any problems with the double quotes. But I'm not sure why you're running into trouble, either. –  Jonathan Leffler May 17 '12 at 6:39
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You're already using printf. Use printf instead of echo. This works just fine:

printf "Enter the IP address: "
read server
a=":"
b="["
c="]"
d="${b}${server}${c}"
printf "%s\n"  $d

Whenever you are having problems with echo, you can use printf just like the way I show it. In fact, I recommend that you use it instead of echo. Here's an example:

echo -n "Enter a string: "
read string
echo "$string"

Seems simple enough, but what if I entered -foo as my string? The echo will fail. However, this will work:

printf "%s" "Enter a string: "
read string
printf "%s\n" $string

No matter what you enter in for $string.

I did change the setting of $d by using quotes and curly braces. If you don't use quotes when setting d, and someone enters in this * is a string for your IP address, your program will expand * to match all of th files in the directory. Probably something you don't want. The curly braces just make it easier to see variables when they're all smushed together like that. Plus, it'll probably put each word on its own line.

Enter this * is a test as your IP address and try setting $d without quotes and then with quotes and see what happens.

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If you echo a variable without quoting it, the contents are subject to, among other things, glob expansion. A glob consisting of open and close square brackets with something between them is seen by the shell as a pattern which is a choice of any of the characters within.

Here's a demonstration:

$ mkdir newdir
$ cd newdir
$ var='[192.168.0.1]'
$ echo $var     # unquoted
[192.168.0.1]
$ touch 0
$ echo $var     # unquoted
0
$ echo "$var"   # quoted
[192.168.0.1]

As you can see, there is a file in the directory (after the touch command) called "0". There is a "0" inside the square brackets which matches. The sequence of characters inside the square brackets is simply that, not a string (when the variable is unquoted), but the duplicates are ignored. In this example, [192.680] is equivalent.

The lesson? You have a file named "0" in your directory. The solution? Always quote variables when their consumed.

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