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I'm having a simple issue where my C executable is crashing after attempting to grab input from the user.

The idea of the program is to populate an array and eventually generate some data on that array. So far I have attempted to grab input from the user and immediately after the exe crashes. I've also edited the code temporarily whilst trying to debug what the issue is with no success. I have not touched c in a number of years and was very young when I had last and am quite a novice.

Can someone advise on any possible solution to why it would be crashing?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

double get_double(char prompt[50])
{
    double tempDouble = 0;
    printf("%s", prompt);
    scanf("%d", tempDouble);
    return tempDouble;
}

void populate_array(double *pData[])
{
    int i = 0;
    *pData[0] = get_double("Please Enter A Number : "); 
    //for(i = 0; i < sizeof(*pData); i++)
    //{
        //*pData[i] = get_double("Please Enter A Number : ");   
    //}
}

double get_sum(double data[10])
{
    int i = 0;
    double result = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < sizeof(data); i++)
    {
        result += data[i];
    }
    return result;
}

int main()
{
    //Variable Declarations
    bool running = true;
    bool playAgain = false;
    double numbers[10];
    double sum, min, max, var, dev;

    //Process
    populate_array(&numbers);
    sum = get_sum(numbers);
    printf("%d",sum);
}
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1  
Just look at compilation warnings (if using gcc, use -Wall -Werror), and see that the compiler finds your bugs (some of them). –  ugoren May 17 '12 at 6:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

void populate_array(double *pData[]) accepts an array of pointer, while you pass it just an array, it should be:

void populate_array(double pData[])
{
    int i = 0;
    pData[0] = get_double("Please Enter A Number : "); 
}

Also, when you read the double, it should be:

// as proposed by Jonathan, the format string should contain '%lf' for double, I overlooked it.
scanf("%lf", &tempDouble);

if you pass scanf just tempDouble, it treats its value as an address, which is invalid address of course.

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Thanks for your reply. I was trying to pass an array of doubles by reference so when populate_array returns, the double array declared in Main() would have the new values. Could you suggest a change to the code achieve this? –  TheyShineToBright May 17 '12 at 6:38
    
an array is decayed to a pointer when passed to a function, so what you did is OK, the issue is that you declared void populate_array(double *pData[]) instead of void populate_array(double pData[]) –  MByD May 17 '12 at 6:40
    
@TheyShineToBright: arrays are passed by reference automatically. If you really wanted to accept a pointer to an array, you'd have to write: void populate_array(double (*array)[]) instead. Your call is correct for this type; unfortunately, the function definition is different. Did you not get lots of compiler warnings about mismatched types? If not, you need to turn on more compiler warnings or get a better compiler. –  Jonathan Leffler May 17 '12 at 6:42
    
No worries. Thankyou very much for your help :) –  TheyShineToBright May 17 '12 at 6:47
    
I dont understand what your first paragraph has to do with the answer, please explain. –  lolo May 17 '12 at 6:54

Your code contains:

scanf("%d", tempDouble);

You need to add & to the parameter you use in scanf(). And %d is used with integer. When you want to use double you need to use %lf; with a float, you'd use %f.

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1  
Should it be %lf since it is a double? %f is for float, with scanf(), unlike printf(). –  Jonathan Leffler May 17 '12 at 6:28
    
Certainly a bug, but not the crash reason. It will just cause an incorrect result. –  ugoren May 17 '12 at 6:32
    
@ugoren: Passing an uninitialized double where it will be treated as a pointer to int is a pretty good recipe for a crash. –  Jonathan Leffler May 17 '12 at 6:33
    
Jonathan Leffler you are right... i missed the 'l' –  Ofer May 17 '12 at 6:34
    
@JonathanLeffler, you are right again. I saw the wrong type, missed the missing &. –  ugoren May 17 '12 at 6:39
for (i = 0; i < sizeof(data); i++)

this will iterate after you reached the boundaries of the array.

for (i = 0; i < sizeof(data)/sizeof(double); i++)

this may be works but is not elegant

double get_sum(int numberOfElements, double data[10])
{
    int i = 0;
    double result = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < numberOfElements; i++)
    {
        result += data[i];
    }
        return result;
}

this is the better approach

sum = get_sum(10, numbers);

In the main function call the get_sum function like this

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