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Is it possible to write this without the [^...] but with using the \P{...}?

#!/usr/bin/env perl 
use warnings;
use 5.012;
use utf8;

my $string = '_${Hello}?${World}!';

$string =~ s/[^\p{Alphabetic}\p{Mark}\p{Decimal_Number}\p{Connector_Punctuation}]/-/g; 

say "<$string>";
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What is your desired output? –  anubhava May 17 '12 at 7:36
1  
@anubhava, just run the program. It's <_--Hello----World--> –  cjm May 17 '12 at 7:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Well, it's possible but I don't think I'd call it an improvement:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use warnings;
use 5.012;
use utf8;

my $string = '_${Hello}?${World}!';

$string =~ s/(?=\P{Alphabetic})
             (?=\P{Mark})
             (?=\P{Decimal_Number})
             (?=\P{Connector_Punctuation}) . /-/xgs;

say "<$string>";

With multiple positive lookaheads, they all have to succeed. So it matches one character (the .) that is not Alphabetic and not Mark and not Decimal_Number and not Connector_Punctuation, just like the negated character class would.

I added the /s modifier because the original regex would match a newline (although your sample string doesn't have one). I added /x so I could add some whitespace and break it over multiple lines.

What do you have against character classes, anyway?

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it seems, that author like obvios perl, without [^\]\[\{]+?. good technique and readable code :) –  gaussblurinc May 17 '12 at 7:54
    
On the way of trying to remember something that I've read somewhere this question crossed my path. –  sid_com May 17 '12 at 9:26

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