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I am new to javascript and I'm trying some different things. Take this following example:

function obj(){
    this.execute = function(codeToExecute){
        codeToExecute();
    }
}

// Object init and function call

var obj = obj();
obj.execute(function(){
    alert("G'Day!");
}

This will execute the alert message. All good until now but now I'm trying to alert a message transmitted through a parameter:

var obj = obj();
obj.execute(function(message){
    alert(message);
}

What should be the structure of the function obj() now that I have to insert that parameter somewhere?

I couldn't find anything useful on google because honestly I don't know exactly what I should be looking for. Thank you!

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can extend execute so that any additional parameters are passed to the supplied function:

function Obj() {
    this.execute = function(f) {
        var args = [].slice.call(arguments, 1);
        f.apply(this, args);
    }
}

var obj = new Obj();
obj.execute(function(message){
    alert(message);
}, "boo!");

This line is the "magic" one:

var args = [].slice.call(arguments, 1);

It uses the Array.prototype.slice function which is used to copy arrays, but (kind of) tricks the function into using the arguments pseudo-array as the source array (instead of the supplied []), copying all of the elements apart from the first.

You can't just use arguments.slice(1) because arguments isn't a real JS array. It has a .length property, and you can access arguments[n], but it doesn't have all of the extra functions in its prototype that a real array has. It's close enough though that the implementation of .slice() doesn't know any better.

NB: you should use new to create an object instance - in your original code you're just calling obj() immediately and then reassigning the (undefined) result back to obj - that code could never have worked at all.

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+1 though the OP might need an example of how to call it from his code :) –  Jack May 17 '12 at 8:22
    
@Jack yeah, done that now. –  Alnitak May 17 '12 at 8:24
    
Deleted my answer. This is the answer. –  Nemoden May 17 '12 at 8:27
    
@Alnitak Thank you! It works. Could you please explain [].slice.call(arguments, 1)? I found some details about call() and apply() but nothing about []. Thanks again!. –  TGM May 17 '12 at 8:40
    
@TGM I already just did :) –  Alnitak May 17 '12 at 8:40
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You can do it like this:

function obj(){
 this.execute = function(codeToExecute, arg){
     codeToExecute(arg);
   }
} 

var obj = new Obj(); 
obj.execute(function(message){
               alert(message);},
           "yourmessage");

Essentially, you pass 2 arguments to your obj.execute: the function, and the argument to that function.

share|improve this answer
    
or you could use my answer, which supports an arbitrary number of arguments... –  Alnitak May 17 '12 at 8:29
    
For someone new to JavaScript, this might be a little easier to understand. Using apply and using [] to get the argument array is a little more advanced, even though it is more general purpose. –  Steve Rowe May 17 '12 at 8:34
    
Someone new to js should not get into these bad habits. Make maintenance difficult –  Decrypter May 17 '12 at 8:46
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You could use the good old set/get methods. Below I'm passing in the message into the object constructor and it can be accessed with the getMessage function. You can include a set function if you don't want to pass into the constructor

function Obj(message){
this.getMessage = function(){
return message;
}
    this.execute = function(codeToExecute){
        codeToExecute();
    }
}

var obj = new Obj("hello");
obj.execute(function(){
    alert(obj.getMessage());
});
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that's really horrible. It makes the function being passed unnecessarily dependent on Obj. –  Alnitak May 17 '12 at 9:20
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