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As anything non-zero means true, but the >, <, == etc. operators returning 1 for true, I'm curious if there are any notable C compilers where these operators can result in a value greater than 1.

In other words, is there any compiler where int i = (a==b); would result in undefined behavior if I intended to use i not as a boolean value, but as an integer, and was assuming it would be either 0 or 1 ?

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That would be a notable compiler. –  Michael Burr May 17 '12 at 8:33
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s/notable/<insert-profanity-here>/g :-) –  paxdiablo May 17 '12 at 8:54
    
Is this just a 'thought experiment' question, or are you trying to write code that will compile on any c compiler ever written. If you are bothered that it might not work, just invert your comparisons. false is always 0. –  Neil May 17 '12 at 9:24
    
@Neil: I do write a code that should compile with compilers from around 1997, and just to make sure I did "booleanize" it with ?1:0, but I was wondering if I really have to be that paranoid. –  vsz May 17 '12 at 10:12
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7 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

No, if there are, they're not C compilers :-) The standard mandates that relational and equality operators return 1 for true and 0 for false.


The rule for interpretation of integral values as boolean values by C states that 0 is false and any other value is true. See C11 sections dealing with if/while/do/for, which all contain language like "while the expression compares unequal to zero". Specifically:

6.8.4.1/2: In both forms [of the if statement, one with and one without an else clause], the first substatement is executed if the expression compares unequal to 0. In the else form, the second substatement is executed if the expression compares equal to 0.

6.8.5/4: An iteration statement [while, do and for] causes a statement called the loop body to be executed repeatedly until the controlling expression compares equal to 0.


However, it's quite explicit what result you will get for the comparison-type expressions, you either get 0 or 1. The relevant bits of the C11 standard for these are all under 6.5 Expressions:

6.5.8/6: Each of the operators < (less than), > (greater than), <= (less than or equal to), and >= (greater than or equal to) shall yield 1 if the specified relation is true and 0 if it is false.

6.5.9/3: The == (equal to) and != (not equal to) operators are analogous to the relational operators except for their lower precedence. Each of the operators yields 1 if the specified relation is true and 0 if it is false.

6.5.13/3: The && operator shall yield 1 if both of its operands compare unequal to 0; otherwise, it yields 0.

6.5.14/3: The || operator shall yield 1 if either of its operands compare unequal to 0; otherwise, it yields 0.

6.5.3.3/5: The result of the logical negation operator ! is 0 if the value of its operand compares unequal to 0, 1 if the value of its operand compares equal to 0.


And this behaviour goes way back to C99 and C89 (ANSI days). The C99 sections dealing with relational and equality operators also states that the return values is either 0 or 1.

And, while the C89 draft doesn't explicitly dictate the return values for equality operators, it does say:

The == (equal to) and the != (not equal to) operators are analogous to the relational operators except for their lower precedence.

And the relational operators section does state:

Each of the operators < (less than), > (greater than), <= (less than or equal to), and >= (greater than or equal to) shall yield 1 if the specified relation is true and 0 if it is false.

Reference: http://flash-gordon.me.uk/ansi.c.txt since I don't have any copies of the C89 standards floating around. I do have the second edition of K&R (the ANSI one from 1988) which basically says the same thing, in sections A7.9 and A7.10 of Appendix A, the Reference Manual. If you want a definitive answer from the first edition, that'll have to come from someone with a wife less prone to throwing out old junk.


Addendum:

According to Michael Burr, who is either not married or has a more accommodating wife than I in terms of keeping old books :-)

K&R 1st Edition (1978) also says the same in 7.6 and 7.7: "The [relational operators] all yield 0 if the specified relation is false and 1 if it is true." ... "The [equality operators] are exactly analogous to the relational operators except for their lower precedence."

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When was this fixed? I don't have access to the standards, especially the older ones. I know this is the rule, but is it also expected to be true for (correctly functioning) pre-C11 compilers? –  vsz May 17 '12 at 8:42
    
It was the same in C99. I'll have to investigate C90 but I believe it was the case there as well. –  paxdiablo May 17 '12 at 8:44
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@Als: Almost all compilers existing now are C99, except for some compilers made in 1997 which are still used for specific embedded processors (yes, even new ones), without specifying anywhere in the manual which standard they are based on (I assume not older than C89). –  vsz May 17 '12 at 8:47
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Done while you were typing that comment, @vsz :-) –  paxdiablo May 17 '12 at 9:01
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K&R 1st Edition (1978) also says the same in 7.6 and 7.7: "The [relational operators] all yield 0 if the specified relation is false and 1 if it is true." ... "The [equality operators] are exactly analogous to the relational operators except for their lower precedence." So I think this behavior has been true for a long time for all except the odd-ball C compiler. Keep in mind that using the results of relational or equality operators in arithmetic expressions like a += (b == c) might not be seen every day, but they're common enough. They might have been even more common back in they day. –  Michael Burr May 18 '12 at 7:05
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They are guaranteed to return 0 or 1.

Reference:
C99 Standard: 6.5.9 Equality operators

Para 3:

The == (equal to) and != (not equal to) operators are analogous to the relational operators except for their lower precedence.108) Each of the operators yields 1 if the specified relation is true and 0 if it is false. The result has type int. For any pair of operands, exactly one of the relations is true.

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If the compiler is non standard conforming then it might be any return value but standard mandates the values to be 0 or 1 and compiler implementations should adhere to what the standard mandates. –  Alok Save May 17 '12 at 8:40
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I don't think people here are answering the question. Question was not about what the standard says, the question was about if there are any notable compilers out there that do not obey the standard in that regard.

No, as far as I know, there are not.

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+1 as no matter what the standard says, there is always someone who does not follow 100% through, just look at CSS. But yes, I hope no one will violate such thing as simple as this. –  vsz May 17 '12 at 9:04
    
Yes, as I said. K&R C(before ANSI) had no limitation on the range of values yielded by comparison operators (apart from "false == zero") –  wildplasser May 17 '12 at 9:05
    
@wildplasser: and not without reason. A relational operator can be faster if it's enough to return non-zero vs. having to set the value always to one. This is why I didn't find it totally impossible for legacy compilers for low-end microcontrollers to take this shortcut. –  vsz May 17 '12 at 10:18
    
I don't think "faster" was an objective. There is still the "as if" rule, and in most cases the boolean value is only used for its truth value (so the "as if" rule applies). Use of boolean values in arithmetic expressions is very rare, and a ternary operator will be much more explicit in that case. I don't know what the exact rationale for the c89 decision was, probably something vague like "tidy up" or "stay aligned with C++". –  wildplasser May 17 '12 at 10:29
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I don't have access to the C standard, but according to Wikipedia:

C uses an integer type, where relational expressions like i > j and logical expressions connected by && and || are defined to have value 1 if true and 0 if false, whereas the test parts of if, while, for, etc., treat any non-zero value as true.

Wikipedia luckily does have the correct citations, but as they're references to books, not sure how much help that is :).

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I know this, I just wanted to be sure there aren't any exceptions. –  vsz May 17 '12 at 8:35
    
If the standard dictates it, then there's not going to be a compiler that violates something as simple as this (that is actually used). –  Corbin May 17 '12 at 8:35
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As far as i can find is this from 6.5.9 paragraph 3 in C99 standard

The == (equal to) and != (not equal to) operators are analogous to the relational operators except for their lower precedence.108) Each of the operators yields 1 if the specified relation is true and 0 if it is false. The result has type int. For any pair of operands, exactly one of the relations is true.

Therefore it seems that the evaluated values should be either 1 or 0

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By specification, to be considered the C language, the conditional operators must return 0 for false and 1 for true.

In haiku form:

Specification
Disallows this behavior,
Otherwise not C.
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Before c89/c90/ANSI-C, the compare operators were guaranteed to produce a zero value on a "false" condition, and not-equal-to-zero otherwise. The substitute 1 for true "standardisation" that was introduced by c89 is seldomly needed, and in cases where is is needed, one could use a = (b==c) ? 1 : 0;.

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I'm not sure it's correct to say that "the substitute 1 for true 'standardisation'" was introduced by c89. K&R's 1978 edition clearly states the 0/1 behavior for relational and equality operators. I'd guess (and it is really just a guess) that that spec was followed more often than not. It certainly is possible that it was somewhat common to not follow it, but the rule wasn't new to C89. –  Michael Burr May 18 '12 at 7:24
    
Could have been evolving practice. I think we still have K&R1 at work somewhere. (but IIRC K&R1 never dictated a "standard"; it only described a language) I'll try to check it out monday. K&R2 somewhat predates c89/c90, but the book I remember had some "features ANSI C" badge on the cover. Could have been a reprint of the 2nd edition. –  wildplasser May 18 '12 at 8:51
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