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I read source code of JDK and confused with the wording of the code. The method of code mean that returns a string representation of the contents of the specified array.

eg: int[] a = { 0,1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };
return : [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

JDK version

 public static String toString(int[] a) {
    if (a == null)
        return "null";
   int iMax = a.length - 1;
   if (iMax == -1)
        return "[]";

    StringBuilder b = new StringBuilder();
    b.append('[');
    for (int i = 0; ; i++) {
        b.append(a[i]);
        if (i == iMax)
            return b.append(']').toString();
        b.append(", ");
    }
}

My questions:
1, Why not put the if condition on the outside of the for loop
code:

 //the follow code efficiency may be better or not
 for (int i = 0; i< iMax; i++) {
        b.append(a[i]);
        b.append(", ");
    }
 return  b.append(a[iMax]).append(']').toString();

2, StringBuilder the append method, if the parameter is the bracket, the method use the char parameter and not the String , I deep into the append methods , theappend(char c) approach appears to high efficiency, but I'm not sure

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you code can be further optimized/refactored like this:

public static String toString(int[] a) {
    if (a == null)
        return "null";
    StringBuilder b = new StringBuilder("[");
    int iMax = a.length - 1;
    if (iMax == -1)
         return b.append(']').toString();;
    for (int i = 0; i < iMax; i++)
        b.append(a[i]).append(", ");
    return b.append(a[iMax]).append(']').toString();
}
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No, now you don't have an optimized code path for the empty-array case. –  Marko Topolnik May 17 '12 at 9:50
    
@MarkoTopolnik: Would you pls care to explain your comment? –  anubhava May 17 '12 at 9:51
    
The original code involves no StringBuilder in the empty-array case. The performance advantage of that is obvious. –  Marko Topolnik May 17 '12 at 10:38
    
@MarkoTopolnik: And how about code repetitions? I would refactor above code even further to have only single return with only single place to attach [ and ]. –  anubhava May 17 '12 at 10:46
    
Optimization and code elegance are often at odds. The implementations of JDK classes prefer performance over LOC. –  Marko Topolnik May 17 '12 at 10:48
  1. Your code compares numbers by < (less-than) which will never perform better than the equals comparison (==), and it may perform worse. So the JDK version is more carefully optimized and thought-through.

  2. Yes, it's more efficient to use a primitve arg wherever applicable. No heap allocation, no pointer derefs (avoids possible cache misses and page faults).

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"Your code uses less-than comparison which can only be less performant than the equals comparison" - what does that mean? –  Oliver Charlesworth May 17 '12 at 9:40
2  
I know what you are saying, but I don't understand why you are saying it! Why is < less efficient than ==? –  Oliver Charlesworth May 17 '12 at 9:44
    
@OliCharlesworth think of assembly-level implementation. == means comparing bit-for-bit; < means a sub followed by a sign-test. At best they are the same, and there's a good chance < is less performant. –  Marko Topolnik May 17 '12 at 9:46
2  
On most platforms, these will be identical cost. In fact, I can't think off-hand of an instruction set where they would be different. And even if there was a difference, I would expect the JVM/JIT to do the "right thing". –  Oliver Charlesworth May 17 '12 at 9:47
1  
@MarkoTopolnik: All the relevant flags are set by the CMP instruction (on x86, at least). –  Oliver Charlesworth May 17 '12 at 10:27
  1. You have to write the "if" condition inside the "for" loop, cause the structure of "for" loop is :

      for(initialization, test condition, modifier expression)
    
     eg: for(int i=0 ; i<10 ; i++)
    

    As in the above example for (int i = 0; ; i++) has no test condition, it must be written inside the "for" loop, else it will keep iterating..ie. infinite loop.

  2. Here the method public static String toString(int[] a) has a return type of String, so its easier to convert it in to string format using toString(), now if it was "char" then it was to be first converted to Wrapper object "Character", then we can apply toString() to it...its tedious.... but can be done...

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1.) If you put the if condition after the loop it will add a comma to the end of the string before going out of the loop. Resulting in "[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,]". Note the final comma after 9. This is the simplest way to get the job done.

2.) StringBuilder is used when you don't want to put a lot of Strings in the String pool which won't get cleaned out. But the honest answer is I'm not sure!

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