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I'm trying to make a simple substring search using the brute force technique but I'm getting an error which I can't see. I'm quite new to programming so please keep that in mind. The problem might be very simple.

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace SubstringSearch
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.Write("Please enter some letters: ");
            string sequence = Console.ReadLine();
            Console.Write("Enter the sequence you want to search for: ");
            string pattern = Console.ReadLine();

            Console.WriteLine(Search(pattern, pattern.Length, sequence, sequence.Length));

            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        public static int Search(string pattern, int patternLength, string sequence, int stringLength)
        {
            int i;
            int j;

            if (stringLength >= patternLength)
            {
                for (j = 0; j <= (stringLength - patternLength); j++)
                {
                    for (i = 0; i < patternLength && pattern[i] == sequence[i + j]; i++);

                    if (i >= patternLength)
                        return j;
                    else
                        return -1;
                }
            }
            else
                return -1;
        }
    }
}

So I'm getting one error and one warning. First it tells me that not all code paths return a value ( in Search() ). I can't see why. Second I get a warning that my integer 'j' is unreachable in the first for-loop (at 'j++').

Please help! I'm sure the answer is quite simple, but I just can't see it.

share|improve this question
1  
Why don't you want to use standard substring? – Likurg May 17 '12 at 9:23
1  
Also passing pattern and petternLength as parameters is as ugly as it gets. – user755327 May 17 '12 at 9:30
    
Standard substring? The task we got was to search through a string and find a pre-defined sequence. I looked for some help online and found this method which I implemented here. – Fjun May 17 '12 at 9:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The issue seems to lie in your second for loop. Try this:

 if (stringLength >= patternLength)
        {
            for (j = 0; j <= (stringLength - patternLength); j++)
            {
                for (i = 0; i < patternLength && pattern[i] == sequence[i + j]; i++)
                {
                    if (i >= patternLength)
                        return j;                       
                }
            }
        }
 return -1;

That should remove all warnings and errors and compile. Why are you not using the .Contains() method?

Contains

True if the value parameter occurs within this string, or if value is the empty string (""); otherwise, false.

share|improve this answer
    
It that thing supposed to work? The first for loop will only execute once as the second one will always return. – user755327 May 17 '12 at 9:42
    
npinti - I already tried that. Then it tells me that the 'i++' in the second loop is unreachable. Gaaaah!! user755327 - Haven't thought of that. I'll check it out. – Fjun May 17 '12 at 9:43
    
@user755327: I tried it once but it failed, that is why I suggested the Contains method. – npinti May 17 '12 at 9:45
    
I was confused. But this is seriously ugly code. – user755327 May 17 '12 at 9:45
    
@Fjun: The issue was because your 2nd for loop would execute only once, hence, the i++ would not be reached. I have applied another fix, but I really recommend you take a look at what you are trying to achieve. If you are forbidden from using already available functions (such as for homework) I would really recommend you make use of standard methods. – npinti May 17 '12 at 9:48

As far as I can tell, the error you're getting is because if the first 'for' loop didn't run even once then you would not hit a return statement. It might be unlikely/impossible but you still have to account for it. The solution to this is to remove the 'else' at the end so that if it gets that far it'll definitely hit the 'return -1'.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That made it work as intended. Can't believe I missed it. – Fjun May 17 '12 at 9:51

the code route of no return is when stringLength = patternLength.

share|improve this answer

Replace

Console.WriteLine(Search(pattern, pattern.Length, sequence, sequence.Length));

with

sequence.IndexOf(pattern);

And get rid of your Search function. You are rewritting (poorly) what's available in framework.

share|improve this answer
    
I know, but I'm in school and the whole point is that we're not allowed to use pre-defined functions. – Fjun May 17 '12 at 9:55
    
You should have said. In that case just get rid of your length parameters and use .Length in your function, and declare your int inside the for with for (int i = 0; ... it's the "standard" for C# and it makes your code more readable if you don't have extra useless lines. – user755327 May 17 '12 at 10:34

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