Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can we create an object of a class inside another class in php?I hav made a small application in php,now I am trying to convert the entire code in a class-methods-object fashion.I m now Confused.

share|improve this question
2  
Can you write a little example that what you want do? –  Yago Riveiro May 17 '12 at 10:33
    
Its like inception –  Sam May 17 '12 at 10:56
2  
Maybe you should share some of the code you'd like to change exemplary and the you should tell what you tried with it and at which point you start to get confused. - also please highlight which part of the PHP manual exactly is not curing your confusion. –  hakre May 17 '12 at 10:57
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes you can, but that increases code coupling and makes testing harder.
I'd suggest creating it outside the class and pass it as an argument (it is called Dependency Injection).

class Foo
{
}

class Bar
{
  public function __construct(Foo $foo)
  {
    $this->foo = $foo;
  }
}

$foo = new Foo();
$bar = new Bar($foo);
share|improve this answer
    
A bad practice why? I disagree with this assertion, can you argument why? –  Yago Riveiro May 17 '12 at 10:41
    
A bad practice because your classes will be tied to each other. This is one of the basics of writing good oriented object code. –  Samy Dindane May 17 '12 at 10:43
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facade_pattern, tied class is not bad if you knows what are you doing. It's a bad practice tied classes that not belongs to same module/scope/domain. Encapsulate behavior is the important, the loose coupling is between concepts and not mandatory between classes –  Yago Riveiro May 17 '12 at 10:51
    
Please don't talk about special cases, or design patterns that are designed that way. There always be exceptions to the rule. Also, I never said that it's mandatory, that it will screw up his code, or anything like this. I simply said that it's a bad practice. Which it is. Because, for example, you can't test it, you can't use another class (subclass of Foo f.e.) inside of Bar, and you can't pass a Foo instance that has been instantiated with different parameters. –  Samy Dindane May 17 '12 at 11:07
1  
The links is because I don't have space here for argument about the dependency injection, The link is only a remark, but if you want open a thread only to discuss about software architecture, you are welcome. You can't assert that one thing is a bad practice without a context, the question did not have a context, you only exposed your opinion without arguments. –  Yago Riveiro May 17 '12 at 13:55
show 5 more comments

You you can do that, but whether you should depends on the lifetime of the two classes and their relation to each other. Basically, you have the choice between Composition and Aggregation.

Composition

You use Composition when the created object has a lifetime equal or less than the object that will use it, e.g.

class A 
{
    private $belongsToAOnly;

    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->belongsToAOnly = new IBelongToA;
    }
}

In this case A "owns" IBelongToA. When A is destroyed, IBelongToA is destroyed too. It cannot live on it's own and is likely just an implementation detail of A. It could be a ValueObject like Money or some other Data Type.

From Craig Larman's "Applying UML and Patterns":

the composite is responsible for creation and deletion of it's parts - either by itself creating/deleting the parts, or by collaborating with other objects. Related to this constraint is that if the composite is destroyed, its parts must be destroyed, or attached to another composite"

Aggregation

You use Aggregation when the lifetime of the created object is longer:

class A 
{
    private $dbAdapter;

    public function __construct(DbAdapter $dbAdapter)
    {
        $this->dbAdapter = $dbAdapter;
    }
}

Unlike with Composition, there is no implication of ownership here. A uses DbAdapter but when A is destroyed DBAdapter lives on. It's a "uses" relationship instead of an "owns" relationship.

Creator Pattern (GRASP)

A good heuristic to decide when an object may create another object at runtime can be found in the Creator Pattern in GRASP which states that objects may create other objects when

  • Instances of B contains or compositely aggregates instances of A
  • Instances of B record instances of A
  • Instances of B closely use instances of A
  • Instances of B have the initializing information for instances of A and pass it on creation.

Alternatively, you can create Factories whenever you need to create instances of something and aggregate the factory instances, which will give you a cleaner separation of collaborators and creators.

Testability

An issue stemming from creating objects within objects is that they are difficult to test. When you do unit-testing, you usually do not want to recreate and bootstrap the entire system environment but concentrate on testing just that particular class in isolation. To do that, you swap out dependencies of that class with Mock Objects. You cannot do that when you use Composition.

So depending on what the collaborators of a class do, you might want to decide to always use Aggregation, because then you are effectively doing Dependency Injection all the way, which will allow you to swap out collaborators of a class easily, for instance to replace them with Mocks.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes, you can create an object from a specific class from inside another class.

class SomeClass{

}
class SomeOtherClass {
     function hello(){
         $o = new SomeClass;
     }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes, you can also define a function in a class. You can do everything in a class in php, please post your code where you confused.

Examples: Object in a class.

class Foo
{
   public $bar; // another object!

   public __construct()
   {
      $this->bar = new Bar();
    }
}

(global)Function in a class

<?php
    class Foo
    {
        public function __construct()
        {
            function __construct()
            {
                echo "Yes, I'm a global function!";
            }
        }
    }

    new Foo();
    __construct();

?>
share|improve this answer
add comment

yes you can do it ..

here is one example..

a.php
<?php
    class a{
        public function function_1(){
           echo "b";
        }
     }
?>


b.php
<?php
     include_once ("a.php");
     class b{
        public function function_b(){
             $a = new a;
             $a->function_1();
        }
      }
      $b= new b;
      $b->function_b();
 ?>
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.