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Lets say I have this:

class A { }
class B : A { }
class C : B { }

class Foo
{
    public void Bar(A target) { /* Some code. */ }
}

class AdvancedFoo : Foo
{
    public void Bar(B target)
    {
        base.Bar(target);
        // Some code.
    }
}

sealed class SuperiorFoo : AdvancedFoo
{
    public void Bar(C target)
    {
        base.Bar(target);
        // Some code.
    }
}

Which overload will be called if I run new SuperiorFoo().Bar(new C()) and why? I'm guessing it will be called cascadely but I can't figure out why and if that behavior is guaranteed.

UPDATED

So, the base. works with both Foo and AdvancedFoo for SuperiorFoo, so which one will be called and why?

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1  
Bar is not static so you can't call SuperiorFoo.Bar –  Sachin Kainth May 17 '12 at 11:33
    
As Bars are not virtual overrides, they are simply hiding methods in the base. –  dasblinkenlight May 17 '12 at 11:33
    
@SachinKainth as you can see, it is "new SuperiorFoo.Bar(..)" there. @dasblinkenlight no they will not. They accept different typed arguments so this is overloading. –  AgentFire May 17 '12 at 11:37
    
@SachinKainth fine reading it's new SuperiorFoo missing the brackets nonetheless –  V4Vendetta May 17 '12 at 11:38
1  
See my updated answer in light of the question being modified. –  KingCronus May 17 '12 at 11:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Edited my answer now that the question has been revised.

A quick trace shows the following:

Entering SuperiorFoo.Bar()
Entering AdvancedFoo.Bar()
Entering Foo.Bar()
Leaving Foo.Bar()
Leaving AdvancedFoo.Bar()
Leaving SuperiorFoo.Bar()

Lets talk through what happens:

  1. SuperiorFoo.Bar() calls its base method. Since SF.Bar() inherits from AdvancedFoo, its base method is AdvancedFoo.Bar().

  2. AdvancedFoo.Bar() then calls its base, which is Foo.Bar() since AdvancedFoo inherits from Foo().

The process flow does NOT jump from SF.Bar() to Foo.Bar() because you could potentially want behaviour from the intermediate class.

If we remove the method from AdvancedFoo, the traversal is slightly different. SuperFoo.Bar() will still call its base method, but since AdvancedFoo doesn't hide the Foo.Bar() method anymore, the logic will jump to the Foo.Bar() method.

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Damn .. i am late to the party +1 –  V4Vendetta May 17 '12 at 11:35
1  
"Stackoverflow" on So –  Ravi Gadag May 17 '12 at 11:36
    
Sorry, i have forgotten to add "base." to callees. Fixed. –  AgentFire May 17 '12 at 11:38
    
In that case, every single one of your methods will be called, cascading, as you suggested. –  KingCronus May 17 '12 at 11:39
    
@AgentFire So is your question why is a method called when a method is called explicitly in code ? –  V4Vendetta May 17 '12 at 11:41

It wil keep calling the Bar() method inside SuperiorFoo untill it crashes with a StackOverflowException. If you want to call the base method of Bar() (so the method inside AdvancedFoo), you'll need to use this:

base.Bar(target);

Edit:

Looks like the code in the original post was changed. What happens now is that SuperiorFoo's 'Bar' will call AdvancedFoo's 'Bar', which will call Foo's 'Bar', and after that the code will be terminated.

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Yeah thats what I did. –  AgentFire May 17 '12 at 11:39
    
You changed your code, didn't you? ;) I pasted it into VS10, but there is no 'base' in my code. –  Leon Cullens May 17 '12 at 11:40
    
Yes I did change it. –  AgentFire May 17 '12 at 11:43

Although KingCronus basically pointed out you have an infinite loop. The Signature will try to first match based on the exact type of object to the appropriate method, then should go down from that...

class Foo
{
    public void Bar(A target) { /* Some code. */ }
}

class AdvancedFoo : Foo
{
    public void Bar(B target)
    {
        base.Bar( (A)target );
        // continue with any other "B" based stuff
    }
}

sealed class SuperiorFoo : AdvancedFoo
{
    public void Bar(C target)
    {
        base.Bar( (B)target ); 
        // continue with any other "C" based stuff
    }
}

By typecasting to the "Other" type (ie: B or A), it will go up to the appropriate chain...

share|improve this answer
    
The infinite loop was due to an error on the part of the OP when copy/pasting. I have since modified my answer :-) –  KingCronus May 17 '12 at 11:56

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