Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm completely new to Mysqli (switching over from MySQL), so to keep things simple, safe, and secure, would it make sense to run absolutely ALL Mysqli queries through this one-size-fits-all function?

Why or why not and what would be the Pros and Cons either way?

function mysqli_prepared_query($link,$sql,$typeDef = FALSE,$params = FALSE){ 
  if($stmt = mysqli_prepare($link,$sql)){ 
    if(count($params) == count($params,1)){ 
      $params = array($params); 
      $multiQuery = FALSE; 
    } else { 
      $multiQuery = TRUE; 
    }  

    if($typeDef){ 
      $bindParams = array();    
      $bindParamsReferences = array(); 
      $bindParams = array_pad($bindParams,(count($params,1)-count($params))/count($params),"");         
      foreach($bindParams as $key => $value){ 
        $bindParamsReferences[$key] = &$bindParams[$key];  
      } 
      array_unshift($bindParamsReferences,$typeDef); 
      $bindParamsMethod = new ReflectionMethod('mysqli_stmt', 'bind_param'); 
      $bindParamsMethod->invokeArgs($stmt,$bindParamsReferences); 
    } 

    $result = array(); 
    foreach($params as $queryKey => $query){ 
      foreach($bindParams as $paramKey => $value){ 
        $bindParams[$paramKey] = $query[$paramKey]; 
      } 
      $queryResult = array(); 
      if(mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt)){ 
        $resultMetaData = mysqli_stmt_result_metadata($stmt); 
        if($resultMetaData){                                                                               
          $stmtRow = array();   
          $rowReferences = array(); 
          while ($field = mysqli_fetch_field($resultMetaData)) { 
            $rowReferences[] = &$stmtRow[$field->name]; 
          }                                
          mysqli_free_result($resultMetaData); 
          $bindResultMethod = new ReflectionMethod('mysqli_stmt', 'bind_result'); 
          $bindResultMethod->invokeArgs($stmt, $rowReferences); 
          while(mysqli_stmt_fetch($stmt)){ 
            $row = array(); 
            foreach($stmtRow as $key => $value){ 
              $row[$key] = $value;           
            } 
            $queryResult[] = $row; 
          } 
          mysqli_stmt_free_result($stmt); 
        } else { 
          $queryResult[] = mysqli_stmt_affected_rows($stmt); 
        } 
      } else { 
        $queryResult[] = FALSE; 
      } 
      $result[$queryKey] = $queryResult; 
    } 
    mysqli_stmt_close($stmt);   
  } else { 
    $result = FALSE; 
  } 

  if($multiQuery){ 
    return $result; 
  } else { 
    return $result[0]; 
  } 
} 
?> 

Example(s): 
For a table of firstName and lastName: 
John Smith 
Mark Smith 
Jack Johnson 
Bob Johnson 

<?php 
//single query, single result 
$query = "SELECT * FROM names WHERE firstName=? AND lastName=?"; 
$params = array("Bob","Johnson"); 

mysqli_prepared_query($link,$query,"ss",$params) 
/* 
returns array( 
0=> array('firstName' => 'Bob', 'lastName' => 'Johnson') 
) 
*/ 

//single query, multiple results 
$query = "SELECT * FROM names WHERE lastName=?"; 
$params = array("Smith"); 

mysqli_prepared_query($link,$query,"s",$params) 
/* 
returns array( 
0=> array('firstName' => 'John', 'lastName' => 'Smith') 
1=> array('firstName' => 'Mark', 'lastName' => 'Smith') 
) 
*/ 

//multiple query, multiple results 
$query = "SELECT * FROM names WHERE lastName=?"; 
$params = array(array("Smith"),array("Johnson")); 

mysqli_prepared_query($link,$query,"s",$params) 
/* 
returns array( 
0=> 
array( 
0=> array('firstName' => 'John', 'lastName' => 'Smith') 
1=> array('firstName' => 'Mark', 'lastName' => 'Smith') 
) 
1=> 
array( 
0=> array('firstName' => 'Jack', 'lastName' => 'Johnson') 
1=> array('firstName' => 'Bob', 'lastName' => 'Johnson') 
) 
) 
*/ 
share|improve this question
1  
I think will be more easy to make it in one Class, not one function –  YamahaSY May 17 '12 at 11:49
2  
No, it is not OK. –  tereško May 17 '12 at 12:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I'm sorry, but no I think it's a terrible idea.

A good function/method should be short, to the point, and designed to do one thing and only one thing well. It should also try to avoid branching logic where possible (keep the number of if and switch statements to a minimum). Such functions are easy to understand as their inner workings can be grasped with relatively little effort.

The longer a function is, the harder it becomes to understand because the programmer has to hold more in their head regarding how it works. The more if/switch/try/catch/throw statements the function contains, the harder it becomes to understand because they modify how execution might flow through the function. You have to take into account something known as the npath complexity (a count of the possible ways a function can execute). Every if you add will double the npath complexity. Based purely on counting ifs I got a complexity of 64, which is far too high! Loops can increase npath complexity as well, so the actual complexity metric for your function is probably a lot higher than that.

Changing a function like the one you've given becomes far more work than it would be if it was a collection of smaller simple functions, because it's very difficult to make a particular change to achieve the intended new behaviour without having unwanted knock-on effects. Of course you can use a unit test to make sure that this doesn't happen, but with a high npath complexity, the number of tests you'll have to write to make sure the functionality of your function is fully covered is inordinately large.

Good general rules of thumb:

  • If a function's body can't fit on your screen, then it probably can't fit in your head either. Avoid functions that are longer than your editor window. You should never have to scroll to see the entirety of a function.
  • You get 2 ifs per function. More than that and the npath complexity can start to become unmanageable.
  • A function should do one thing well. A function that tries to be a jack of all trades will probably fail to be correct in every case. Additionally, the more responsibility a function tries to take on the more difficult it becomes for the function to meet all the responsibilities it has.
  • Small functions are reusable, big ones aren't.
  • In the name of everything that's holy, comment your code! It's almost impossible for someone else to look at your function and figure out what it's meant to do. Breaking it down and following the earlier guidelines would help considerably, but even then computer code isn't as good as expressing ideas to other human beings than plain English is. Comments clarify points that might not be clear at a casual glance and can help another programmer figure out what was in your head when you were designing and implementing the code. They cost nothing in terms of execution time so there really is no excuse not to comment. If you leave this code alone and come back to look at it again in a year's time, I can guarantee that you'll never figure out what you were thinking at the time you wrote it.

A much better solution would be to implement a class that provides the services you need as a series of methods.

An even better solution would be to check how much of this PHP can do through its built in functionality for you. As I can't really understand your function I couldn't say for sure whether PHP can already do what you need this function to do, but my suspicion is that a good chunk of it is already implemented in PHP.

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for If a function's body can't fit on your screen, then it probably can't fit in your head either.. –  Robik May 17 '12 at 12:15
1  
Incredibly thorough! Great answer. –  MetalFrog May 17 '12 at 15:13

Why reinvent the wheel? MySQLi has a class to use already.

http://us2.php.net/manual/en/class.mysqli.php

Start with this link and begin using it properly.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: This answer is practically fitting and fitting into one's head. –  hakre May 17 '12 at 12:53

One size fits all inevitably means there will be some (possibly a lot) of code that only addresses one specific situation and does not apply to every operation. There will be code in the function that is just getting in the way. There will also probably be many edge cases that the code does not consider, when you find them it will cause you many headaches trying to debug the code.

The simple answer to this is "don't use it". It will be less efficient and will probably make you code confusing to other developers.

Learn to use MySQLi properly. It's not that hard and it will give you a great advantage in the long run.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.