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In a class, I have a container:

public class MyClass implements MyClassInterface {
  private LinkedList<OtherClass> list; //Need to use 'OtherClass' instead of 'OtherClassInterface here
  @Override
  public Iterator iterator() {
    return list.iterator; //Problem!
  }
}

The interface:

public interface MyClassInterface {
  //Is
  public Iterator iterator();
  //Should be
  public Iterator<OtherClassInterface>();
}

Then again, OtherClass also has an interface OtherClassInterface. I want only the interfaces to be used by whom who works with the code. The problem is that I want to use the full OtherClass inside MyClass but pass an iterator over LinkedList<OtherClassInterface> to the caller of MyClassInterface.iterator().

I could not cast the existing LinkedList<OtherClass> to LinkedList<OtherClassInterface> inside MyClass to return the desired iterator.

How to handle such a situation?

EDIT

Reason why I want this behaviour

For another developer, I want to provide two interfaces: The first gives him access to a higher data structure which contains a lower data structure which he should access by the second interface. In the implementing class of the higher interface I use the type of the lower data structure directly, not over the lower interface.

As mentioned, the other developer wants to use both interfaces. Over the higher one I want to provide an iterator that gives access to elements of the lower interface - but not to the class that implements the interface.

Additional needs

I also want the returned iterator to be "Iterable" i.e. so that I can use the "for each" construct. Is this also possible with *waxwing*s solution? If possible, I wouldn´t like to implement an own iterator - for me this seems not neccessary because I just want to give an iterator over elements of the interface instead of the implementing class.

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better yet why don't your explain what you really want to achieve? there might be other/better ways? after all there are probably more solutions to this problem you're having –  ant May 17 '12 at 12:13
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4 Answers 4

You could write your own Iterator implementation that converts between the interface and the concrete implementation when returning from next()

The problem with converting List<OtherClass> to List<OtherClassInterface> is that there is no way to prevent the user of the conversion result to put something other than OtherClass objects into the list (of course those elements must implement the OtherClassInterface as well)

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Can you define the interface like this?

public interface MyClassInterface {
    public Iterator<? extends OtherClassInterface>();
}

list.iterator() should be a valid return value for that method, even when list is List<OtherClass>.

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This works fine! –  user905686 May 24 '12 at 8:18
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Can you change the interface?

public interface MyClassInterface<T> {
    public Iterator<T> iterator();
}

You can always implement your own iterator :

public class MyClass implements MyClassInterface<T> {
  private LinkedList<T> list;

  @Override
  public Iterator iterator() {
   return new Iterator<T>() {
            int index;

            public boolean hasNext() {
                return index < list.size();
            }

            public T next() {
                return list.get(index++);
            }

            public void remove() {

            }
        };
  }
}

didn't test the code

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

The interface can be defined like this:

public interface MyClassInterface {
    public LinkedList<? extends OtherClassInterface> list();
}

Then the implementation should look like this:

@Override
public LinkedList<OtherClass> list() {
    return list; //this is the container of type LinkedList<OtherClass>
}

This has the following advantages:

  • When calling list() by an OtherClass object you will get a LinkedList<OtherClass>
  • When calling list() by an OtherClassInterface object you will get a LinkedList<OtherClassInterface>
  • The return value of each can be used in the for-each loop
  • The iterator can be obtained by list().iterator()
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