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So I'm having issues with some code that I've inherited. This code was building fine in a C-only environment, but now I need to use C++ to call this code. The header problem.h contains:

#ifndef _BOOL
typedef unsigned char bool;
static const bool False = 0;
static const bool True = 1;
#endif

struct astruct
{
  bool myvar;
  /* and a bunch more */
}

When I compile it as C++ code, I get error C2632: 'char' followed by 'bool' is illegal

I get the same error if I wrap the #include "problem.h" in extern "C" { ... } (which I don't understand, because there should be no keyword bool when compiling as C?)

I tried removing the block from #ifndef _BOOL to #endif, and compiling as C++, and I get errors:

error C2061: C requires that a struct or union has at least one member
error C2061: syntax error: identifier 'bool'

I just don't understand how the C++ compiler is complaining about a redefinition of bool, yet when I remove the redefinition and try to just use bool to define variables, it doesn't find anything.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

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2  
Note that extern "C" doesn't mean "compile as C". It means "compile with C linkage". The code inside is still C++, you just aren't allowed to define anything that can't be linked as C. –  Steve Jessop May 17 '12 at 13:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Because bool is a basic type in C++ (but not in C), and can't be redefined.

You can surround your code with

#ifndef __cplusplus
typedef unsigned char bool;
static const bool False = 0;
static const bool True = 1;
#endif
share|improve this answer
    
Damnit, you beat me to it :) –  Eitan T May 17 '12 at 12:57
1  
But that code is also incompatible with C99's stdbool.h, beware! –  Richard J. Ross III May 17 '12 at 12:57
    
It's still complaining about char followed by bool is illegal, so that means it's not reading the _cplusplus define? –  prelic May 17 '12 at 13:00
    
@prelic it's two underscores before cplusplus. –  Richard J. Ross III May 17 '12 at 13:01
    
Ah, that's it. Great, thanks a bunch. –  prelic May 17 '12 at 13:04

You can use C99's bool:

#ifndef __cplusplus
#include <stdbool.h>
#endif

bool myBoolean; // bool is declared as either C99's _Bool, or C++'s bool data type.

Why should you use this?

For compatibility with other C99 code. _Bool is commonly used in C99 Code, and is very useful. It also grants you the ability to have a boolean datatype without the need to typedef a lot of stuff, as behind the scenes, _Bool is a datatype defined by the compiler.

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Nothing takes one bit in memory. Did you mean to write byte? –  Luchian Grigore May 17 '12 at 12:59
    
@LuchianGrigore nope, I meant bit. Look into bit fields, when in a struct, bools are packed in a similar way. –  Richard J. Ross III May 17 '12 at 13:00
    
The standard says nothing of size, other than the size of char. The rest is implementation defined. There can exist standard-compliant compilers that use 1Mb to store a bool. –  Luchian Grigore May 17 '12 at 13:02
1  
A _Bool normally takes 1 bit of value and 31 bits of padding... –  R.. May 17 '12 at 13:06
1  
@Richard if structs packed bools into individual bits, how does &someStruct.someBoolMember work? Are you saying that sizeof(bool *) > sizeof(int *)? And that sizeof(bool) somehow returns 1/8 in a size_t. Other than the vector<bool> specialization, and bitfields, bools always take at least one byte. –  IronMensan May 17 '12 at 13:10

You should use the __cplusplus macro:

#ifndef __cplusplus
#ifndef _BOOL
typedef unsigned char bool;
static const bool False = 0;
static const bool True = 1;
#endif
#endif 

Check out this link to the C++ FAQ for further details.

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I had this "'char' followed by 'bool' is illegal" problem in VS also. The problem for me was I did not end my class declaration with a semi-colon- which I was not expecting to be the issue as this was in the header file and the problem was coming up in the cpp file! eg:

class myClass
{

}; // <-- put the semi colon !!
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1  
How is that related to bool as the question? –  Yu Hao Oct 9 at 7:56
    
i was also getting the VS error that was posted in the question of" 'char' followed by 'bool' is illegal" in VS - the fix for me was just to add the semi colon at the end of the class declaration. –  Justin Hirsch Oct 23 at 1:43

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