Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am looking for a way to estimate which developer contributed the most code for each file in an SVN repository. The only way so far I could figure out is to get the svn log per file, parse the first line, and write all these entries. The problem is that fetching the full log separately for each file is very inefficient and takes a lot of time.

  1. Is there a way to get all the log entries for a folder, but also with the file name? The default svn operation does not seem to specify which log entry belongs to which file if you ask for a folder log.
  2. Alternatively, is there a way to perform this sort of batch queries on the repository?

Answers either using the svn command-line tools or programming language bindings are welcome.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you only want to know which user changed which files per revision (not caring for the amount of changes), you can use the command line option -v with svn log. This also works on the complete working directory - as well as on the remote repository.

You might also want to use the command line option --xml. This simplifies parsing for most programming environments.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the --xml; didn't know that. Makes parsing stuff an order of magnitude easier. – Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Jul 22 '13 at 19:08

You can try the opposite approach: svn log --xml -v run at the repository root will output the complete log in XML format including change paths. You then parse it and collect your statistics.

share|improve this answer

Oh boy, that's going to be an interesting statistic.

If you rank your developers using this method, you're going to encourage your developers to spew a lot of changes and code. Will this be used for bonuses? Dilbert's cow-orker Wally would love this. He'd write himself a Ferrari by 4PM. However, if you insist...

Instead of parsing each file, you can simply take the log from the root of the project you're interested in, and pass the range of revisions you want.

This will get you the names of the developers who committed each revision. Here's an example:

$ svn log -r1:HEAD http://server/svn/project 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r1 | david | 2011-07-12 15:18:33 -0400 (Tue, 12 Jul 2011) | 1 line

Adding directories
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r2 | bob | 2011-07-12 15:19:20 -0400 (Tue, 12 Jul 2011) | 1 line

Adding property
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r3 | mark | 2011-08-21 10:33:51 -0400 (Sun, 21 Aug 2011) | 1 line

If you want the names of the files too, you can use the --verbose parameter:

$ svn log -r1:HEAD --verbose http://server/svn/project
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r1 | david | 2011-07-12 15:18:33 -0400 (Tue, 12 Jul 2011) | 1 line
Changed paths:
   A /branches
   A /tags
   A /trunk

Adding directories
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r2 | bob | 2011-07-12 15:19:20 -0400 (Tue, 12 Jul 2011) | 1 line
Changed paths:
   M /trunk

Adding property
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r3 | mark | 2011-08-21 10:33:51 -0400 (Sun, 21 Aug 2011) | 1 line
Changed paths:
   A /trunk/subversion
   A /trunk/subversion/control.ini
   A /trunk/subversion/pre-commit-kitchen-sink-hook.html
   A /trunk/subversion/pre-commit-kitchen-sink-hook.pl
   A /trunk/subversion/svn-watch.html
   A /trunk/subversion/svn-watch.pl

Adding files
------------------------------------------------------------------------

However, if you really want to know who are the most productive programmers, don't look at the code. Productive developers are writing less code than their more inefficient colleagues. A good developer will organize the flow of the code in an efficient manner so there are few exceptions to watch for while a poor developer might take the wrong tack, and then have to handle all the exceptions to their basic rules.

An efficient developer fixes that one file that contained the bug rather than changing dozens of files trying to track down the bug. In fact, a really good developer might even recognize that the problem could be solved by modifying the environment setup rather than the code.

You want to figure out who's pulling their weight in the development arena, look at your issue tracking system. Who is working on the biggest issues and turning them around the quickest? Who adds a feature without causing a cascade of bugs?

A programmers job is to solve problems, not to sling code.

share|improve this answer
1  
I am really, by no means, intend to rank programmers using this method, or, for that matter, rank programmers at all. I am merely trying to establish which developer performed the most operations on a given source file, and therefore is likely to be intimately familiar with it. Thank you for your concern. – Little Bobby Tables May 20 '12 at 6:25
    
@LittleBobbyTables that is still a form of ranking. Better look into the bug tracking system which developer has solved most bugs in a certain area, or in the feature request system which one has developed most feature requests. – Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Jul 22 '13 at 19:04
    
@LittleBobbyTables You can try the svn blame command. This will list each line of the file and who's to blame for it. This will let you know who wrote what line and when. – David W. Jul 22 '13 at 19:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.