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My code sample:

import java.math.*; 

public class x
{
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    BigDecimal a = new BigDecimal("1");
    BigDecimal b = new BigDecimal("3");
    BigDecimal c = a.divide(b, BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_UP);
    System.out.println(a+"/"+b+" = "+c);
  }
}

The result is: 1/3 = 0

What am I doing wrong?

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1  
dolor sit amet:) –  Petar Minchev May 17 '12 at 14:05
    
Sorry about Lorem ipsum but it wouldn't allow me to post without it as "the question was too short". –  Jan Ajan May 17 '12 at 14:06
    
Your result is correct. One-third, rounded to the nearest integer, breaking ties by rounding up, is indeed a flat, round zero. –  Marko Topolnik May 17 '12 at 14:06
    
So if i need 0.33333333? How do I have to divide 1 by 3? –  Jan Ajan May 17 '12 at 14:08
1  
Jan, you specify the scale as 8 for your case. a.divide(b,8, BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_UP); –  Rohan Grover May 17 '12 at 14:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You havent specified a scale for the result. Please try this

import java.math.*; 

    public class x
    {
      public static void main(String[] args)
      {
        BigDecimal a = new BigDecimal("1");
        BigDecimal b = new BigDecimal("3");
        BigDecimal c = a.divide(b,2, BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_UP);
        System.out.println(a+"/"+b+" = "+c);
      }
    }

this will give the result as 0.33. Please read the API

Rohan

share|improve this answer
    
+1; better approach IMO. –  Dave Newton May 17 '12 at 14:13
    
I was looking at 1.5 API which lacks divite(Sigdecimal, int, int)... –  Jan Ajan May 17 '12 at 14:15
    
Jan the link in my post is for 1.5 API . divide(BigDecimal divisor, int scale,int roundingMode) has been around for sometime now, I believe. –  Rohan Grover May 17 '12 at 14:21

Create the BigDecimals using floats, like "1.0"; at least the numerator, if you want a decimal result.

share|improve this answer
    
Is BigDecimal c = a.setScale(5).divide(b, BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_UP); correct approach? Can it be done better? –  Jan Ajan May 17 '12 at 14:11
    
@JanAjan Yep, that's probably a better approach. –  Dave Newton May 17 '12 at 14:13

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