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I have a custom class called CustomClass. It contains a variable called "Name" and a list of values (for the sake of simplicity let's make this an int - in reality it is another custom class, but the principle should be the same).

So :

public class CustomClass {
   string name;


} 

I have a List<CustomClass>.

When I attempt to add a value to this List, the logic I want, is for this List to check if it contains a CustomClass with the same name as the value I want to add.

If it does, then do x, otherwise, do y.

listOfCustomClass.Contains(customClassToAdd.name) will not work in this case, I assume, however this is the functionality I require.

What is best practice here ?

share|improve this question
    
Fixed. Thanks for pointing it out. – Simon Kiely May 17 '12 at 14:12
    
why are you putting .name? wouldn't it be listOfCustomClass.Contains(customClassToAdd) – joocer May 17 '12 at 14:12
    
No, that is the point. I want to check if it contains a Custom Class with the same name :) – Simon Kiely May 17 '12 at 14:14
    
Please correct it List<int> listOfIntegers = new List<int>(); you are missing (). – jams May 17 '12 at 14:14
    
I'll just remove it since it's completely irrelevant :) – Simon Kiely May 17 '12 at 14:19
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you can try something like var x = MyList.Where(C=> C.Name == InsertedName) and check the result (not tested)

share|improve this answer
1  
May as well use Any instead of Where since Simon is just looking to see if the collection contains a matching entry and doesn't care about retrieving all matching entries. – Chris Sinclair May 17 '12 at 14:24
    
When I attempt this I get the error Error 5 Cannot implicitly convert type 'CustomClass' to bool. My code is : var classExists = listOfCustomClass.Where(c => c.Name == classToAdd.Name); – Simon Kiely May 17 '12 at 14:28
    
Question answered before it was posted ! :) – Simon Kiely May 17 '12 at 14:29
    
Be carefull, classExists is not boolean, it's type is list<> which you should test if is null or no elements, if it has elements (count> 0) then the name already exists. – mslliviu May 18 '12 at 6:03

You'll have to create a new class,let's call it CustomList, that inherits from IList<> where you can override the add method, do your check, and then add it to the base. Something like this:

public class CustomList<T> : IList<T> where T : CustomClass
{
    private List<T> innerlist;
    public void Add(T item)
    {
        if(innerlist.Any(a => a.Name == item.Name)))
            innerlist.Add(item);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Whoops! I posted this before your edit. Let me re-edit. – Thinking Sites May 17 '12 at 14:17
    
You can ignore the IList wrapper and focus on the Any() statement. I wrote the IList wrapper before your edit that clarified your question. – Thinking Sites May 17 '12 at 14:20

you can do it using linq as follow but you have to make name field public.

        List<CustomClass> list = new List<CustomClass>();
        CustomClass toCheck = new CustomClass();

        if (list.Any(p => p.name.Equals(toCheck)))
        {
            //do x here
        }
        else
        {
            //do y here
        }

however if you don't want to use linq then Do some changes in CustomClass as follow

public class CustomClass
{
    string name;
    List<int> intLost = new List<int>();

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return this.Equals(obj as CustomClass);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return 0;
    }

    public bool Equals(CustomClass cc)
    {
        if (cc == null) return false;
        return this.name.Equals(cc.name);
    }
}

Then you can do this.

        List<CustomClass> list = new List<CustomClass>();

        CustomClass toCheck = new CustomClass();
        if (list.Contains(toCheck))
        {
            //do x here
        }
        else
        {
            //do y here
        }
share|improve this answer

It seems to me that you want to override the .Add() behavior of your List<CustomClass>. While you could use extension methods, I think a better solution would be to invent a class that extends List in some manner. I'd recommend implementing IList in your collection class if you need to have that level of control over add operations...

    public class CustomClassList : IList<CustomClass>
    {
        public void Add (CustomClass item)
        {
            if(this.Select(t => t.Name).Contains(item.Name))
                // Do whatever here...
            else
                // Do whatever else here...
        }

        // ... other IList implementations here ...
    }
share|improve this answer

try this:

IList<CustomClass> list = new List<CustomClass>();

CustomClass customClass = new CustomClass();
customClass.name = "Lucas";

if((list.Tolist().Find(x => x.name == customClass.name)) == null)
{
    list.Add(customClass);
}
else
{
    //do y;
}
share|improve this answer

You could override the Equals(object o) function in your CustomClass, so that two CustomClasses are considered equal if their names are the same. Then

listOfCustomClass.Contains(customClassToAdd);

should work.

share|improve this answer

Another way is to override Equals method on your CustomClass and then just call List.Contains()

share|improve this answer

If the name property uniquely identifies the CustomClass, then you should overload Equals and GetHashCode(). The reason List.Contains doesn't work is that underneath the HashCodes are compared. So you need to overload GetHashCode and Equals something like this:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return this.name.GetHashCode();
}

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    var other = obj as CustomClass;

    if (other != null)
    {
        if (other.Name == this.Name)
        {
             return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

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