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I have the following code for a conversion program:

private void convertButtonActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) {

    int type, value;
    double conversion;
    String output;

    type = Integer.parseInt(conversionchoiceInput.getText());
    value = Integer.parseInt(valueInput.getText());

    if (type == 1)
    {
    conversion = inchesToCentimetres(value);
    output = value + " inches = " + Math.round(conversion) + " centimetres";
    }
    else if (type == 2)
    {

    }
    else if (type == 3)
    {

    }
    else if (type == 4)
    {

    }
    outputLabel.setText(output); 
}

It says "variable output might not have been initiaized" when I already have?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
When you write String output; you're declaring output. When you write String output = ""; (or any value. "" is just an example) you're initialising it. –  Tharwen May 17 '12 at 14:46
    
In general it is a bad idea to split declaration and initialization of variables (type, value). Declare them on initialization, if possible. Only split them if necessary (before a try/catch-block, for instance). –  user unknown May 21 '12 at 23:26

3 Answers 3

The problem is that output needs to be initialised no matter what execution path the program takes. It is only initialised in the if path. Therefore, you need to give it a default value at the start (of empty string or something) or set it in all branches.

String output = "";

or

if (type == 1)
{
    conversion = inchesToCentimetres(value);
    output = value + " inches = " + Math.round(conversion) + " centimetres";
}
else if (type == 2)
{
    output = "";
}
else if (type == 3)
{
    output = "";
}
else if (type == 4)
{
    output = "";
}

Naturally, the first option is the best.

share|improve this answer
    
you can also initialize it with the most common value, that way you don't have to check for the most common option in the if statement, just check the others. –  Euclides Mulémbwè May 17 '12 at 14:34

If type != 1, then output isn't initialized. And even if you give output a value in each of the if branches (1, 2, 3, 4) output might not have been initialized, as if type < 1 or > 4 it still has no value.

share|improve this answer

You have just declared the variable there which is different from initializing it.

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